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COHASSET 




TOWN REPORT 



2002 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
of the FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 

of the 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Reports of the School Committee 

and the 
Reports of Other Town Officers 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2002 



Town of Cohasset 

Incorporated 1770 
Population January 2002 — 7546 



President of the United States of America 
George W. Bush 



Massachusetts Senators 

Edward M. Kennedy 

John F. Kerry 



Tenth Congressional District 
Representative William D. Delahunt 



Norfolk and Plymouth Senatorial District 
Senator Robert L. Hedlund 



Third Plymouth Representational District 
Representative Garrett Bradley 



Annual Town Meeting 
Date Set by Board of Selectmen 



Election of Officers 
Within 35 days of the Annual Town Meeting 



IN MEMORIAM 



Sheldon Ripley - January 23, 2002 

School Facility Committee 

Bi-Centennial Committee 

Insurance Advisory Committee 



Elinor I. Kennedy - April 3, 2002 
School Teacher 

Robert M. Thompson - May 26, 2002 
School Teacher 

Arthur Somerville - July 3, 2002 
Water Commissioner 

Call Firefighter 
Advisory Committee 

Mildred Salyards - August 29, 2002 
School Employee - Cafeteria Manager 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. - August 26, 2002 

Special Police Officer 

Sealer Weights & Measures 

Water Department Superintendent 

Private Ways Committee 

Herbert Marsh - August 23, 2002 

Conservation Commission 

Committee on Town Land & Water Supply 

Call Firefighter 

Edward M. Guild - October 10, 2002 

Sewer Advisory Committee 

Sewer Commission 



ELECTED OFFICIALS - TOWN OF COHASSET 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN - 3 YEAR TERM TERM EXPIRES 

Michael H. Sullivan 2003 

Merle S. Brown 2004 

Thomas J. Callahan 2004 

Roseanne McMorrls 2005 

Frederick Koed 2005 

MODERATOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

George L. Marlette, ill 2005 

TOWN CLERK - 3 YEAR TERM 

Marion L. Douglas 2005 

ASSESSOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

Michael C. Patrolia 2003 

Elsa Miller 2004 

Mary Granville 2005 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 YEAR TERM 

Richard F. Flynn 2003 

Chartis L. Tebbetts 2003 

Mark DeGiacomo 2004 

Patricia Martin 2004 

F. Jane Pescatore 2005 

TRUSTEES PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY - 3 YEAR TERM 

Agnes McCann 2003 
Patience G. Towie ^ 2003 

Carol Riley 2003 

June S. Hubbard 2004 

Sarah R. Pease 2004 

Barbara Power 2004 

Sheila Evans 2005 

Roger L. Lowe 2005 

Roger S. Whitley 2005 



BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 YEAR TERM 

Margaret S. Chapman 2003 

Stephen N. Bobo 2004 

Robin M. Lawrence 2005 



COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 YEAR TERM 



Ann Barrett 


2004 


Joanne Young 

John Muncey 

Ralph Peroncello 

Helen Nothnagle (appointed by Governor) 


2005 
2006 
2005 
2006 


PLANNING BOARD - 5 YEAR TERM 




Robert H. Sturdy 
William Good 


2003 
2004 


C. Christopher Ford 
Peter J. Pratt 


2005 
2006 


Alfred S. Moore 


2007 



RECREATION COMMISSION - 5 YEAR TERM 

Richard Barrow 2003 

Anthony J. Carbone 2004 

Wallace B. St. John 2005 

Frederick H. Grassie, Jr. 2006 

Lillian Murray Curley 2007 

Mary K. Muncey 2007 

James Richardson 2007 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

R. Gary Vanderwell, Jr. 2003 

Sean Cunning 2004 

Raymond Kasperowicz 2005 

WATER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

John McNabb 2003 

Robert E. Kasameyer 2004 

Glenn A. Pratt 2005 



TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Manager/ Chief Procurement Officer Term Expires 

Mark W. Haddad 2005 

Town Counsel 

Paul R. DeRensis 2003 

TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY TOWN MANAGER 

ADA Co-coordinator 

Robert M. Egan 2005 

Animal Control Officer 

Paul W. Murphy 2003 

Assessor/ Appraiser 

Mary Quill 2005 

Board of Health Director 

Joseph Godzik 2003 

Building Inspector/Zoning Officer 

Robert M. Egan 2005 

Chief of Police 

Robert Jackson 2004 



Sergeants of Police Under Civil Service 

David C. Cogill 
John C. Conte 
David J. Pomarico 
William P. Quigley 
Gregory J. Lennon 



Patrolmen Under Civil Service Term Expires 

Lawrence D. Ainslie 
Brian Curran 
William English, Jr. 
Frederick H. Grassie 
Garrett A. Hunt 
Lisa M. Matos 
James P. McLean 
Shellee L. Peters 
John H. Small 
Christy J. Tarantino 
Jeffrey R. Treanor 
Paul M. Wilson 
Francis P. Yannizzi 

Civilian Dispatch 

Barbara DeWolfe 
Patricia Douglas 
Sasha Geddes 
Christopher Grant 
Kristen Green 
Thomas Wigmore 

Constable - 3 Year Term 

Maria A. Plante 2003 

Civil Defense and Emergency Preparedness 

Arthur H. Lehr, Jr. 2003 

Council of Elder Affairs 

Kathleen Bryanton 2003 

D.P.W. Superintendent 

Carl Sestlto 2005 



Director of Finance/ Town Accountant 


Term Expires 


J. Michael Buckley, Jr. 


2006 


Fence Viewers 




Kearin A. Dunn 
Glenn A. Pratt 


2003 
2003 



Fire Chief 



Roger W. Lincoln 



2003 



Fire Department Under Civil Service 



Randy Belanger 
Paul T. Bilodeau 
Richard Covino 
James F. Curley 
Hugh Devlin 
John J. Dockray 
Thomas P. Finegan 
James E. Fiori 
James Lee Gurry 
John M. Hernan 
Leigh Landry 
Sharon Leone 
Frances X, Mahoney, Jr. 
Matthew B. Marr 
Laura C. Morrison 
Robert F. Protulis 
William J. Protulis 
Randall W. Rosano 
James P. Runey 
Robert D. Silvia 
Daniel Smith 
Peter Starvaggi 
Mark H. Trask 
Eric Wenzlow 



Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter 

Captain/EMT 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/EMT 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Captain/EMT 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Firefighter/Paramedic 

Captain 

Firefighter/EMT 



Forest Warden 



Roger W. Lincoln 
Harbor Master 
John H. Winters II 



2004 



Assistant Harbor Masters Term Expires 

Robert D. Baggs 2003 

Clifford J. Dickson 2003 

Lorren S. Gibbons 2003 

Robert A. Johnson 2003 

William Kelly 2003 

John D. Muncey 2003 

Christy J. Tarantino 2003 

Keeper of the Town Clock 

Noel A. Ripley 2003 

Library Director 

Janet Husband 2003 

Lockup Keepers 

Robert W. Jackson 

Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

William Higgins 2003 

Recreation Director 

John Worley 2005 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Robert M. Egan 2003 

Shellfish Constables 

Clifford Dickson 2003 

John H. Winters, III 2004 

Shellfish Deputy 

Rocco R. Laugelle 2003 

Robert D. Baggs 2003 

John H. Winters, ill 2004 



Town Archivist Term Expires 

David H. Wadsworth 2003 

Town Planner 

Elizabeth B. Manning 2004 

Treasurer/Collector 

Joseph A. Divito, Jr. 2005 

Director of Veteran Services 

Noel A. Ripley 2003 

BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, COMMITTEES AND REPRESENTATIVES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Advisory Board on County Expenditures 

Merle 8. Brown 2003 

Cohasset Cultural Councel 

Suzanne S. Terry 2003 

David T. Lehr 2003 

Celine Eymer 2003 

Doug Eymer 2003 

Laurel Martinez 2003 

Mary A. Foley 2004 

Diane M. Kennedy 2004 

Shirley T. Tewksbury 2004 
Four (4) Vacancies 



Cemetery Study Committee 

Joseph M. Curley 
James H. Oilman 
Julianna D. Hassan 
Joseph L. Jerz 
Glenn A. Pratt 



10 



civilian Dispatch Committee Term Expires 

Robert Jackson - Police Chief 
Roger W. Lincoln - Fire Chief 
Mark W. Haddad - Town Manager 
Thomas Wigmore- Dispatch Supervisor 

Cohasset Common Historic District Commission 

Gail Parks (District Resident) 2003 

Mary Jane Larson (District Resident) 2003 

Janice Crowley (Licensed Realtor) 2003 

Marian Atkinson (District Resident) 2004 

D. Alex Adkins (Architect) 2004 

John Hovorka (Historical Society) 2004 
William Hurley (Resident Alternate) 
Charles Furtado (District Resident) 
Peter Wood (Non-Resident Alternate) 

Community Preservation Committee 

Al Moore, Planning Board 2003 

Vacancy, Housing Authority 2003 

Paula Kozol, Historical Commission 2003 

Jim Dedes, Conservation Committee 2004 

Deborah Cook, Open Space Committee 2004 

Thomas J. Callahan, Selectmen 2004 

Stuart Ivemey, Resident 2005 

Margy Charles, Resident 2005 

Jeff Wahl. Resident 2005 

Conservation Commission 

Susan G. Cope 2003 

James G. Dedes 2003 

Edward Graham 2004 

Veneta Roebuck 2004 

Virginia A. Brophy 2004 
Jeffrey Wahl 

Deborah S. Cook 2005 

Commission on Disabilities 

Lance Norris 2003 

Four (4) Vacancies 



11 



Elder Affairs, Council on Term Expires 

Joseph D. Buckley 2003 

Rev. Garry RItts 2003 

Katherlne B. Becker 2003 

Nancy Barrett 2003 

Anna A. Abbruzzese 2004 

John W. Coe 2005 

Barbara C. Elliott 2005 

Patricia Sargeant 
Mary H. Ahearn, SSES 
Jane H. Hamilton, Associate 
One Vacancy 

Government Island Advisory Committee 

Peter G. Whitman 2003 

Constance M. Afshar 2003 

Noel A. Ripley 2003 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury 2004 

Richard P. Barrow 2004 

Robert M. Davenport 2005 
John H. Winters, III, Harbor Master 

Growth and Development Task Force 

Clark H. Brewer 
Richard W. Swanborg 
Michael R. Westcott 



Harbor Committee 

Lorren S. Gibbons 2003 

Gail Parks 2003 

John Bertolami ^ 2003 

Matthew Steele 2004 

Peter Wood 2004 

Scott A. Herzog 2005 

Robert Cunningham 2005 

Mary K. Muncey 2005 
John H. Winters, III, Harbor Master 



12 



Historical Commission Term Expires 

Rebecca Bates-l\/lcArthur 2003 

David Wadsworth 2003 

JohnH. Connell 2003 

Mark St. Onge 2003 

Noel A. Ripley 2004 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury 2004 

Paula Kozol 2004 

MBTA Representative 

Louis E. Eaton 2003 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Mark W. Haddad 2003 

Open Space Committee 

Deborah Cook 
Jeffrey Donze 
Kathryn Dunn 
Ellen Freda 
Martha Hurtig 
James Shipsky 

Police/Fire Station Study Committee 

Robert Jackson, Police Chief 

Roger W. Lincoln, Fire Chief 

Virginia A. Brophy 

George L. McGoldrick 

Jean Najjar 

Roger Lowe ^ 

Bob Egan, Building Inspector 

Mark W. Haddad, Town Manager 

Roseanne M. McMorrls. Selectman 



13 



Recycling Committee Term Expires 

John K. McNabb, Jr. 
Merle S. Brown 
Arthur L. Lehr 
David Bigley 
F. Allen MacDonald 
Carol Martin 
Sharyn K. Studley 
Jean White 
One (1) Vacancy 

Registrar of Voters 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 

Margaret R. Charles 2003 

Judith Volungis 2004 

Edythe Ford 2005 

Senior Housing Committee 

Wayne Sawchuk 2003 

Freda A. Zotos 2003 

Edward T. Mulvey 2003 

Joseph R. Nedrow 2004 

Nancy Barrett 2005 

Margaret R. Charles 2005 

Roseanne M. McMorris 2005 
Two (2) Vacancies 

Co-operative 

John K. McNabb, Jr. 
Merle S. Brown 

South Shore Regional School District Rep. 

David M. Kneeland • 2004 



14 



Tree Advisory Committee Term Expires 

Phyllis Peck 
Ann Pompeo 
Vivian Bobo 
Barbara Dillon 
Polly Logan 
Margaret Moore 
Virginia Norman 
Fran OToole 
Annette Sechen 
Patricia Stewart 
Penny Place 

Town History Committee 

Julia Gleason 2003 

Louis Eaton, Jr. 2003 

James W. Hamilton 2003 

Louis S. Harvey 2003 

Harold E. Coughlin 2003 

Hubert P. van der Lugt 2004 

Jacqueline N. Dormitzer 2004 

Ann Pompeo 2004 

Margot Cheel 2004 

WIgmore A. Pierson, Chairman 2005 

Molly M. Pierson 2005 

Ernest J. Grassey 2005 



Village Revitalization Task Force 

Timothy O'Brien 

Noel Ripley 

Rebecca Bates-MacCarthur 

Joseph Coggins 

Merle S. Brown 

Josiah Stevenson 

Lucia Flibbot 

Richard Swanborg 

Elizabeth Harrington 

Water Resources Protection Committee 

John McNabb, Jr. 

James C. Kinch 

Stephen Bobo 

John Chapman 

Three (3) Vacancies 



15 



Youth Resources Committee Term Expires 

John M. Woriey 
Michael McMlllen 
Matthew Ogrodnik 
Rick Grassie 
Elizabeth Bates 
Anthony Carbone 
Steve Etkkind 
Jody Butman 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Benjamin H. Lacy 2003 

Lisa H. Dick 2003 

Barbara M. Power 2004 

Jane O. Goedecke 2004 

S. Wood worth Chittick 2005 

J. Anson Whealler 2005 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES, COMMISSIONS, REPRESENTATIVES 
APPOINTED BY AUTHORITIES OTHER THAN BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Advisory Committee Term Expires 

Debra A. Shadd 2003 

Alexander C. Koines 2003 

Gait Grant 2004 

Susan M. Turgiss 2004 

Maureen Jerz 2004 

Donna McGee 2004 

James Gilmartin 2005 

Bernadette Faulkner - 2005 

Susan Kent 2005 

Bylaw Committee 

Louis R. Eaton 2003 

Jacqueline M. Dormitzer 2005 
Marion L. Douglas 
Paul R. DeRensis 
One (1) Vacancy 



16 



Capital Budget Committee Term Expires 

Mark A. Baker 2003 

David Bergers 2003 

Samuel C. Pease 2004 

Steve Gaumer 2004 

Michael Fechter 2005 

Design Reviev\/ Board 

Kathleen Fox 2003 

Robert Stansell 2005 

Maxwell R. Pounder 2005 

Josiah Stevenson 2005 

Robert C. Hunter 2005 
Robert Egan, Building inspector 

Committee to Survey Structure and Functions of Town Government 

Paul A. Donovan 2003 

William Lean, Jr. 2003 
Seven (7) Vacancies 



School Building Committee 

Joanne Chittick (appointed by School Comm.) 2003 

Particia Chase(appointed by Selectmen) 2003 

Kathleen E. Guinee(appo/ntec/ by Moderator) 2004 

Robert Spofford(appo//7fed by School Comm.) 2004 

Scott Colllns(appo/ntec/ by School Comm.) 2005 

David Chase{appointed by Selectmen) 2005 

Denise K. Parker(appolnted by Selectmen) 2005 

Adrienne MacCarthy(appo/>7teof by Moderator) 2005 

Donna 0'DonnelI(appo/nfeGf by Moderator) 2005 



17 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

The following elections and town meetings were held: 



Annual Town Meeting, March 30, 2002 
Annual Town Election, April 6, 2002 
State Primary, September 17, 2002 
Recount, September 29, 2002 
State Election, November 5, 2002 
Special Town Meeting, November 18, 2002 

The Annual Listing of Persons seventeen years of age and older 
as per General Laws, Chapter 51, Section 4 was conducted by 
mail during January. Voter registration may be done at the Town 
Hall during regular business hours. Also, registration forms are 
available from the Post Office, Paul Pratt Memorial Library, 
Registry of Motor Vehicles, and various state agencies. To register 
to vote, you must be eighteen years of age on or before Election 
Day, born in the United States or become a naturalized citizen. 
Registration is closed for a brief period before each town meeting 
and election to allow election officials time to prepare the voting 
lists. If you register during a "closed" period, you will be eligible to 
vote only in later town meetings or elections. You must be 
registered twenty days before all primaries and elections, and ten 
days before a special town meeting. At this time there is a total of 
5225 active voters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Charles, Chairwoman 
Marion Douglas, Clerk 
Edythe Ford 
Judith P. Volungis 



18 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

January 

The MBTA announces that it has reached an agreement with Balfor Beatty to 

construct the Greenbush rail line. 

Groundbreaking for the new Paul Pratt Library takes place on January 1 7. 

40B became an actively debated issue with the arrival of the Avalon Proposal. 

February 

The new Paul Pratt Library receives commitment on funds from the Board of Library 

Commissioners. 

Town Bond rating is raised to A. 

Sergeant Robert Jackson Is appointed Police Chief. 

March 

Sewer Commission proposes article to engineer sewer expansion for Little Harbor 

and part of Atlantic Avenue. 

MBTA announces It will take land by eminent domain occupied by Graham Waste 

Services to clear room for the new T Station in Cohasset. 

April 

More than 450 residents attend Town Meeting. 

Proposed Ledge article falls to gamer 2/3 vote needed. 

Community Preservation Committee proposal to build new ball fields at the gravel pits 

passes as does proposal to repair the Historical Society's two museums and proposal 

to add land to the Town Open Space rolls. 

Harold Litchfield steps down as head of Department of Public Works after 42 years of 

service. 

Fred Koed and Ronnie McMorris are re-elected. 

May 

Growth and Development Committee begins discussion on the Town Master Plan. 

Red Lion Inn announces plans to add 36 rooms. 

Glenn Pratt works to mitigate Greenbush impact on Woodside Cemetery. 

June 

Tom Carroll of Cashman Construction becomes the MBTA's Community Liaison for 

the Greenbush project. 

The third volume of Town History written by Jackie Dormltzer covering 1950 to the 

present is published. 

Federal Aviation Administration decides to support a compromise plan to expand a 

new mnway at Logan Airport. 



19 



July . 

Cohasset Action is formed to curb tiie effect of 40B on the Town. 

New traffic light at Route 3A and Beachwood is installed to improve safety at 

the intersection. 

August 

Lightning storm creates problems for North Cohasset sewer system. 
Mark Haddad celebrates his five-year anniversary with the Town. 
Middle/High School and Deer Hill renovation projects continue to move 
forward on schedule and within budget. 

September 

A solemn September 11 memorial ceremony is held on the Common. Church 

bells ring from 8:45 am to 9:03 am. 

Town enters into purchase and sale agreement to buy the Barnes Property. 

Police/Fire Study Committee announc4es plan to create additional space at 

the current Police/Fire Station. 

October 

One-way traffic trial on Elm Street is quickly abandoned. 

Town picks Grand Gables Realty Group to market Paul Pratt Library building. 

Debate escalates over harbor revitalization and potential changes to the 

fence. 

November 

State Senator Robert Hedlund and State Rep Garrett Bradley are re-elected 

by large margins. . 

Purchase of Barnes Property Is approved at Special Town meeting, as is an 

$800,000 debt exclusion override to Proposition 2-1/2 to bury wires in 

conjunction with the downtown revitalization project. 

December 

Historical Society announces It intends to place a bid for the Paul Pratt 

Library building. 

Three bids are submitted for the Paul Pratt Library building and John Barry 

submits high bid. 

John Barry assigns his right to the Historical Society, paving the way for the 

Historical Society to buy the Paul Pratt Library building (six local citizens 

fronted the money for the purchase) 

Town begins debate on fiscal 2004 budget. Decrease in state funding will 

have a significant Impact. Fiscal pressures become major Issue. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Michael H. Sullivan, Chairman 

20 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

As the year 2002 comes to a close, I respectfully submit my eleventh report 
as Town Clerk. Along with conducting the annual census, issuing dog 
licenses, certificates, etc., we had three elections, two town meetings and a 
recount. Those results follow this report along with the vital records. For the 
past several years' town meetings have been well attended. At the annual 
town meeting we had 576 voters in attendance and at the special town 
meeting we had 530. However, compared to the number of active voters this 
is still a small percentage of the electorate voting. I encourage anyone who 
has not attended to do so as this is your opportunity to express your thoughts 
on how your town is run. 

Our office extends its appreciation to the citizens of Cohasset, town officials, 
department heads, town employees, election workers and committees for 
their support and assistance during the year. A sincere thanks goes to my 
assistant, Carol St. Pierre. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



21 



Index Annual Town Meeting - March 30, 2002 



Article # Description of Article 

1 Reports of Town Officers. Adopted. 

2 Reports of Committees. Adopted unanimously. 

3 Operating budget FY2003. Adopted. 

4 Community Preservation Committee Recommendations. Adopted. 

5 Additional department appropriations for Fiscal Year 2002. Adopted. 

6 Accept Section 4, Chapter 73, Acts of 1 986. Adopted unanimously. 

7 Sewer Plant Improvements. Adopted. 

8 Little Harbor Sewer District improvements. Adopted. 

9 Little Harbor Sewer District easements. Article withdrawn. 

1 Authorization of Water Commissioners to sell water. Article 
withdrawn. 

1 1 Act for Water Commissioners to provide water services to other 
towns. Article withdrawn. 

1 2 Amend Section 1 4 of Zoning Bylaw - Water Resource District. 
Article withdrawn. 

1 3 Water Department improvement project. Adopted unanimously. 

14 Amend Article II, General Bylaws, Town Meeting. Adopted 
unanimously. 

1 5 Amend Section 1 1 of Zoning Bylaw, Removal of Ledge. Defeated. 

1 6 Appropriate $200,000 to construct two Little League fields at Gravel 
Pits. Adopted. 

1 7 Amend Article VII, Safety and Public Order by adding new section 
Underground Utility Conversion. Article withdrawn. 

1 8 Amend Zoning Bylaw, new section 1 5 "Accessory Dwelling Unit 
Special Permit. Adopted. 

19 Amend Section 12.5 of Zoning Bylaw. Defeated. 

20 Amend Section 3.2 of the Zoning Bylaw, Zoning Map. Adopted 
unanimously. 

21 Citizen's petition to amend Section 3.3.2 of Zoning Bylaw. Article 
withdrawn. 

22 Citizen's petition, An Act to Establish a Special Election in the Town 
of 23 Cohasset Pertaining to certain financial matters. Defeated. 

23 Citizen's petition, An Act to establish a local binding initiative petition 
process in Cohasset. Defeated. 

24 Citizen's petition, Funding request to defray legal costs for a lawsuit 
against Massport's new runway. Adopted. 

25 Citizen's petition. Funding for engineering for a new sidewalk on 
Beechwood St. Adopted. 

26 Accept early retirement incentive. Article withdrawn. 

27 Stabilization fund. Article withdrawn. 



22 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 30, 2002 

At the Annual Town Meeting held on Saturday, March 30, 2002 at the 
Cohasset High School Sullivan Gymnasium the following articles were 
contained In the warrant and acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn In by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 9:30 a.m. were 
Carol St. Pierre, Janice Rosano, Kathleen Rhodes, Margaret Hernan and 
Carlo Getto. Tellers were appointed and sworn In by the Moderator, George 
L Marlette III. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 10:03 a.m. and a quorum of 
100 was present at that time. The registered voters checked In on the voting 
list totaled for Precinct 1 - 367; and Precinct 2 - 209 . 
Herbert Towie gave the invocation. 

Members of the Boy Scouts called the pledge of allegiance. 

Voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting 
and Return of Service having been examined by the Moderator and found to 
be in order. 

Moved the following rules of procedure be adopted for 2002, Annual Town 
Meeting: that at the beginning of the Annual Town Meeting, the Moderator 
shall call aloud each of the articles printed in the warrant by number, that 
those articles for which any seven (7) voters states a "hold" shall be held for 
further debate, that those articles upon which no hold has been placed shall 
all then and there all collectively, by one motion, be adopted in accordance 
with the proposed Town Manager's motions for each respective article and 
that the remaining articles that have been so held shall thereafter be called 
individually by the Moderator for separate debate and vote, unless at the time 
the article is called, the hold thereon is withdrawn, in which event the article 
shall then and there be voted upon without further debate. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

It was moved by Arne Gjesteby to put a hold on every article and seven 
voters also agreed to this. Therefore, each article will be called and voted 
upon individually. 



23 



Article 1 : 

To act upon the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual 
Town Report for 2001. 

Moved that the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual 
Town Report for 2001 be accepted, and filed with the permanent records of 
the Town. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 2: 

To hear the reports of any Committee heretofore chosen and act thereon. 

Moved that the reports of any committee heretofore chosen be heard and 
accepted and that committee continue in office. 

A report was given by Frederick Koed, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
and Merle Brown for the Recycling Committee. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

The Moderator recognized Representative Garrett Bradley and Senator 
Robert L. Hedlund. 

Article 3: 

To see If the Town will vote to fix salaries and compensation of Elected 
Officers, and to see what sums the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
from available funds or otherwise, for the payment of the salaries and 
compensation, expenses, equipment and outlays, capital and otherwise, of 
the several Town Departments, for the ensuing fiscal year. 
Moved that Twenty Six Million Seven Hundred Thirty One Thousand Nine 
Hundred Seventy Nine ($26,731,979.00) Dollars be appropriated for the 
Fiscal Year 2003 at Annual Town Budget to be allotted as follows: Sixty Two 
Thousand Four Hundred Fifty ($62,450.00) Dollars for salaries of elected 
Town Officials consisting of the Town Clerk $52,920.00; Clerk, Board of 
Registrars, $329.00; Moderator, $1.00; Selectmen, Chairman, $1,500.00, 
Members (4) at $1,000.00, $4,000.00; Board of Assessors, Chairman, 
$1,300.00, Members (2) at $1,200.00, $2,400.00; and the remaining Twenty 
Six Million Six Hundred Sixty Nine Thousand Five Hundred Twenty Nine 
($26,669,529.00) Dollars for Personal Services, Expenses and Capital 
Outlays, Interest on Maturing Debt and other charges for various 
departments as recommended for purposes in Appendix A and Appendix B 
of the Warrant for the 2002 Annual Town Warrant, a copy of which 
Appendices are incorporated here by reference, and to meet the 
appropriation, the following transfers are made: 



24 



$1 ,758,334.00 from Water Revenue 

$ 379,544.00 from Surplus Revenue 

$100,000.00 from Overlay Surplus 

$ 60,000.00 from Pension Reserve 

$ 50,000.00 from Sale of Lots 

$ 10,000.00 from Waterways Fund 

and the remaining balance of $24,374,101.00 is raised from taxation and 
other general revenues of the town; and further that the Salary Rate and 
Schedule as printed in the Warrant and shown in Appendix B be adopted. 
Motion adopted. 



25 



APPENUXA 

TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 30, 2002 



Appropriation Acoount 
GENERAL GOVERNMEtfT 



Appropriattd 



R0qu»st»cl 



Town 

Manager 

Raeommundad 



Peso nat Services 
Board of Saleetmsn 



$673.00 



Bected Officials 
General Expenses 



$5,468.64 
$52,403.72 



$5,496.64 
$67,746.73 



$6,600.00 
$84,41^00 



$5,500.00 
$66,012.00 



$5,500.00 
$66,01200 



Town Manager 



Personal Sen/ices 


$74,982.63 


$79,998.62 


$80,000.00 


$102,500.00 


$102,500.00 


Town Hall aerteal 


$323,835.11 


$361,800.16 


$367,000.00 


$401,689.00 


$401,969.00 


General Expenses 


$3,587.20 


$3,664.03 


$4,485.00 


$6,360.00 


$6,380.00 


Advisory Commlttea 












General Expenses 


$0.00 


$210.00 


$345.00 


$345.00 


$345.00 


Reserve Fund 












Reserve Fund 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$100,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$100,000.00 


Direetor of Finance/Town Accountant 












Personal Services 


$63,080.00 


$70,188.80 


$75,200.00 


$80,400.00 


$80,400.00 


Genertf Expenses 


$23,685.53 


$18,353.57 


$29,700.00 


$31,400.00 


$31,400.00 



Elected CWidals 
Personal Sen/ices 
Gerwral Expenses 



$3,666.66 
$58,759.51 
$8,625.70 



$3,699.96 
$58,572.60 
$9,760.00 



$3,700.00 
$61,376.00 
$17,255.00 



$3,700.00 
$61,176.00 
$17,255.00 



$3,700.00 
$61,176.00 
$9,755.00 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



$54,054.71 
$36,483.03 



$53,500.20 
$43,316,41 



$58,000.00 
$41,250.00 



$61,000.00 
$42,750.00 



$61,000.00 
$42,750.00 



Legal Budget 
General Expenses 
Miscellaneous 



Town Reports 
Parking aer1< 
Annual Audit 

South Shore Coalition - Refuse 
Water Purchase 
Plumbing & Gas Inspections 
Sealer Weights/Measures Salary 
Sealer Weights/Measures Expenses 
Emergency Management Salaries 
Social Service League • Services 
Veteran's Agent Salary 
Veteran's Agent Expenses 
Commission on Disabilities 
Historical Commission 
Historical Preservation Salary 
Historical Preservation Expenses 
Keeper of the Town ClocK 
Keeper of the Town Pump 
Town Celebrations 



$10,545.21 


$13,530.45 


$15,000.00 


$20,000.00 


$15,000.00 


$Z494.79 


$2,351.74 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$7,500.00 


$7,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


$4,000.00 


M,000,00 


$4,000.00 


$4,000,00 


$4,000.00 


$39,000.00 


$34,024.63 


$35,000.00 


$35,000,00 


$35,000.00 


$5,355.00 


$6,110.00 


$5,800.00 


$6,500.00 


$6,500.00 


$996.66 


$1.86262 


$2,600.00 


$2,600.00 


$2,600.00 


$130.34 


$156.60 


$450.00 


$450.00 


$450,00 


$360.00 


$350.00 


$450.00 


$450,00 


$450.00 


$45,786.86 


$46,754.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$1,466.63 


$1,599.96 


$1,600.00 


$1,600,00 


$1,600.00 


$387.42 


$365.96 


$1,000,00 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$100.00 


$100,00 


$10000 


$0,00 


$162.12 


$200.00 


$200.00 


S200.00 


$0.00 


$600.00 


$600.00 


$600.00 


$600.00 


$188.34 


$0.00 


$200.00 


$200.00 


$200.00 


$100,00 


$100,00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


S100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$1,700.00 


$1,700.00 


$1,700.00 


$1,700.00 


$1,700.00 



26 



D»p(. 



Appmprtallon Aeeount 



ExpMtM 



Appropilatod 



Town 
Doparimont Uanagar 

R^quastod Raeommandad 
FJaeel 2003 



Town CIsrk & Elections 



Beded Officials 
ParWrme Salaries 
General Expenses 



$44,909.16 $47,240.80 

$8,779.32 $10,076.50 

$e,56ZB3 $0,668.15 



$50,400.00 $52,020.00 $52,020.00 

$10,140.00 $15,721.00 $15,721.00 

$18,365.00 $11,435.00 $11,435.00 



171 Conrarvation Commission 

General Expenses 

175 Pianning Board 

Payroll & General Expenses 

176 Zoning Board of Appeals 
General Expenses 



$22,822.12 $22,076.66 $26,820.00 $27,800.00 $27,800.00 



S3,015.46 $24,405.85 $51,080.00 



00 $68,030.00 



S3.4S3.11 $2,124.63 $4,385.00 $4,385.00 $4,385.00 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMEhfT 



$1,094,205.47 $1,200,053.12 $1,340,286.00 $1,397,731.00 $1,385,231.00 



210 



PUBUC SAFETY 

Police Department 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Cruiser Purchase 

220 Fire Department 



$1,230,661.63 
$60,234.22 
$30,000.00 



$1,335,553.32 
$78,575.00 
$52,000.00 



$1,420,928.00 
$79,275.00 
$52,000.00 



$1,482,019.00 
$00225.00 
$52,000.00 



$1,482,019.00 
$90,225.00 
$25,000.00 



General Expenses 
Hydrant Rental 



$1,173,072.83 
$81,264.85 
$65,752.00 



$1.231 .58a 10 
$116,748.58 
$120,403.44 



$1,328,272.00 
$141,925.00 
$132,608.00 



$1,418,288.00 
$145,780.00 
$142,073.00 



$1,392,998.00 
$131,48000 
$132.e0&00 



Building Commissioner 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



$52,725.59 
$3,209.05 



$55,341.64 
$3,378.58 



$57,540.00 
$3,655.00 



$60,400.00 
$3,055.00 



$60,400.00 
$3,955.00 



245 Electrical Inspector 

General Expenses 
295 Harbor Master 



$12,304.09 



$1^413.71 



Personal Services 
General Expenses 



$49,279.34 
$5,610.43 



$49,805.00 
$5,550.01 



$51,374.00 
$7,400.00 



$50,603.00 
$7,400.00 



$59,803.00 
$7,400.00 



27 



Appropriation Aeoount 
Shellfish Constable 



Exp«nd«d Appreprl»fd 



Parsonal Services 
Gerwral Expenses 



$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 



TOTAL PUBUC SAFETY 



$2,773,614.03 $3,070,847.38 $3,290,067.00 $3,476,943.00 $3,401,978,00 



Cohassst Public Schools 

gsggpti Elemenlarv School 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Sallies 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 

Dger mi Etenwntary .School 



$1.281, 16Z 00 

$156,054.00 

$212,788.00 

$2,294.00 



$1,350,403.00 

$176,841.00 

$240,893.00 

$2,721.00 



$1,497,660.00 

$172,794.00 

$339,601.00 

$3,615.00 



$1,662,449.00 

$166,218.00 

$329,991.00 

$2,615.00 



$1,662,449.00 

$156,218.00 

$329,091.00 

$2,515.00 



$1,652,296.00 $1,770,858.00 $2,013,570.00 $2,151,173.00 $2,151,173.00 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 



$1,337,149.00 

$107,916.00 

$338,307.00 

$1,988.00 



$1,384,291.00 

$99,893.00 

$367,092.00 

$1,937.00 



$1,475,029.00 

$123,539.00 

$475,910.00 

$3,037.00 



$1,614,672.00 

$109,855.00 

$345,058.00 

$2,637.00 



$1,614,672.00 

$109,865.00 

$345,058.00 

$2,637.00 



Sub Total 

Middle/Senior High School 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Special Education Salaries 

Special Education Expenses 



$1,785,358.00 $1,853,213.00 $2,077,515.00 $2,072,222.00 $2,072,222.00 



$3,136,643.00 

$557,464.00 

$234,208.00 

$2,131.00 



$3,226,078.00 

$543,380.00 

$249,955,00 

$3,988.00 



$3,332,573.00 

$599,518.00 

$262,438.00 

$6,061.00 



$3,615,478.00 

$634,801.00 

$368,763.00 

$5,031.00 



$3,615,478.00 

$634,801.00 

$366,763.00 

$5,031.00 



SubTolal 



$3,930,466.00 $4,023,40100 $4,200,590.00 $4,624,073.00 $4,624,073.00 



Expenses 

Special Education Salaies 

Special Education Expenses 

Sub Total 

Total Cohasset Public Schools 

South Shore Vocational Technical 

Regional Assessment 



$382,125.00 
$130,474.00 
$132,692.00 
$032,319.00 



$383,997,00 
$357,144.00 
$135,804.00 
$857,281.30 



$464,268.00 
$165,935.00 
$398,100.00 
$023,577.00 



$538,852.00 
$46Z239.00 
$172,483.00 
$722,513.00 



$536,852.00 
$462,230.00 
$172,483.00 
$722,513.00 



1,510.00 $1,734,226.30 $1,951,880.00 $1,896,087.00 $1,896,087.00 

1,632.00 $9,381,698,30 $10,243,555.00 $10,743,555.00 $10,743,555.00 



$60,000.00 



TOTAL SCHOOLS 



$9,435,271.30 $10,298,680.00 $10,803,555.00 $10,803,555.00 



28 



D»pt 

tia. Appropriation Aeeeunt 



Expanded 



Appropritt9d 



D9partm*nt 
Raquostad 



Tom 

Manager 
Raeommertdod 



PUBUC WORKS 

422 Dapartment of Public Works 

Personal Senricos 
General Expenses 
Building Maintenance 
Snow & Ice Control 
Street Ughtlng 



$444,000.33 $503,700.50 $538,377.00 

$431,676.62 $544,814.76 $564.12000 

$120,827.02 $337,657.77 $317,854.00 

$66,633.08 $121,624.10 $50,000.00 

$46,073.56 $63,206.13 $50,000.00 



$e34.42Z00 $634,42ZO0 

$535,380.00 $535,360.00 

$330,856.00 $330,666.00 

$50,267.00 $50,287.00 

$55,800.00 $55,800.00 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 



630 Recreation Connmlsslon 



TOTAL PUBUC WORKS 



$1,561,002.38 $1,541,451.00 $1,606,635.00 $1,606,635.00 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



General Expenses 
Board of Health 



$170,836.23 



Personal Expenses 
General Expenses 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



HUMAN SERVICES 
541 Bdor Affair* Board 



$55,543.72 
$0,206.61 



$01,707.00 
$13,800.00 



$06,105.00 
$12,560.00 



$06,105.00 

$izseo.oo 



Personal Sen/ices 
General Expenses 



$75,572.66 $03,161.16 $88,460.00 

$20,565.00 $30,876.02 $33,516.00 



$103,053.00 $103,053.00 

$20,150.00 $20,150.00 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



$105,137.66 



$133,103.00 



Personal Sen^ices 
General Expenses 



$220,140.40 $247,166.40 $270,705.00 $311,666.00 $280,560.00 

$58,654.00 $67,410.83 $70,237.00 $84,001.00 $81,091.00 



Personal Expenses 
General Expenses 



$85,00831 
$3,860.62 



$01,063.26 $100,820.00 

$4,225.79 $4,500.00 



$120,567.00 $120,567.00 

$6,280.00 $6,280.00 



TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 



$377,572.62 



$410,766.28 $455,271.00 



29 



OspL 



Expendad 



D»panm«nt 
R»qu»sted 



Recommond^d 



OTHER BUDGETS 



Principal 
Intermt 
Exduded Debt 



$476,785.00 

$356,527.54 

$1,158,156.97 



$564,391.48 

$442,728.42 

$1,434,734.48 



$789,042.00 

$434,417.00 

$1,879,767.00 



$933,198.00 

$488,634.00 

$2,272,718.00 



$933,198.00 

$488,634.00 

$2,272,718.00 



Botwfits and Inauranca 



Pension - County AsaesamenI 
Penaion • Non Confrasutory Asseasment 
Workers Compensation Insurance 
Unempioymenl Insurance 
Health Insurance 
Life Insurance 

Medicare Tax - Employer Contribution 
Property & Liability Insurance 



$602,667.00 
$3,316.60 
$68,441.00 
$5,747.29 
$945,248.19 
$5,259.50 
$102,155.27 
$99,050.70 



$583,210,00 

$3,316.80 

$63,331.00 

$8,807.53 

$1,082,473.98 

$4,387.07 

$100,000.00 

$126,717.17 



$647,867.00 
$3,400.00 

$105,000.00 

$5,000.00 

$1,288,000.00 

$5,000.00 

$122,000.00 

$130,000.00 



$e93.2iaoo 

$3,400.00 
$105,000.00 

$6,000.00 
$1,476,160.00 

$5,000.00 
$140,000.00 
$155,000.00 



$eg3,2iaoo 

$3,400.00 
$105,000.00 

$5,000.00 
$1,476,160.00 

$5,000.00 
$140,000.00 
$155,000.00 



WATER DEPARTMBJT 
Water Department 



TOTAL OTHER BUDGETS 



$5,409,493.00 $6,277,328.00 



General Expenses 
Other Appropriations 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 



$600,923.77 $631,538.54 

$125,348.54 $155,768.91 

$392,150.00 $408,850.00 

$322,656.00 $340,063.82 



$641,872.00 $690,540.00 $690,540.00 

$129,806.00 $31,296.00 $31,296.00 

$667,91000 $866,910.00 $666,910.00 

$401,64000 $369,586.00 $369,588.00 



TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT 



$1,758,334.00 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



$20,010,042.94 $22,149,436.26 $25,002,418.00 $26,844,550.00 $26,731,979.00 



SUMMARY 

General Government 

Public Safety 

SciTOols 

Department of Public Works 

Heaim and Sanitation 

Human Services 

Culture and Recreation 

Ottier Budgets 

Water Department 



$1,094,205.47 

$2,773,614.03 

$9,039,788.00 

$1,109,102.40 

$241,189.19 

$105,137.66 

$377,572.62 

$3,828,355.26 

$1,441,078.31 



$1,200,053.12 

$3,070,947.36 

$9,435,271.30 

$1,561,092.38 

$306,088.52 

$124,036.08 

$410,766.28 

$4,414,097.93 

$1,626,221.27 



$1,349,286.00 

$3,290,067.00 

$10,298,680.00 

$1,541,451.00 

$684,958.00 

$131,984.00 

$455,271.00 

$5,409,493.00 

$1,841,228.00 



$1,397,731,00 

$3,476,043,00 

$10,603,555,00 

$1,605,635.00 

$867,417.00 

$133,103.00 

$523,504.00 

$6,277,328.00 

$1,758,334.00 



$1,385,231.00 

$3,401,978.00 

$10,803,555.00 

$1,606,636.00 

$867,417,00 

$133,103.00 

$498,398,00 

$6,277,328.00 

$1,758,334.00 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



$20,010,042.94 $22,149,456.26 $25,002,418.00 $26,844,550.00 $26,731,979.00 



30 



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32 



PAY GRADE 


1st 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


A 


9.2035 
322.12 
368.14 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


B 


9.9377 
347.82 
397.51 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


C 


10.7636 

376.73 

430.54 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


D 


11.6028 

406.10 

464.11 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hre. 


E 


12.5205 

438.22 

500.82 


Hourly 
35Hfs. 
40Hrs. 


F 


13.5169 

473.09 

540.68 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


G 


14.6181 
511.63 
584.72 


Hourly 
35 Mrs. 
40Hrs. 


H 


15.7719 

552.02 

630.88 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


1 


17.0436 

596.53 

681.74 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


J 


18.3939 

643.79 

735.76 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


K 


19.8754 

695.64 

795.02 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


L 


21.4749 

751.62 

859.00 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40 Mrs. 


M 


23.2055 

812.19 

928^ 


Hourly 
35Hrs. 
40Hrs. 


N 


25.0279 

875.98 

1001.12 


Hourly 
35 Mrs. 
40Hrs. 





27.0469 

946.64 

1081.88 



2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 



9.7280 10.2523 

340.48 358.83 



389.12 410.09 



10.5146 11.0783 
368.01 387.74 
420.58 443.13 



11.3405 11.9435 
396.92 418.03 
453.62 477.74 



12.2845 12.9137 
429.96 451.98 
491.38 516.55 



13J2546 13.9365 
463.91 487.78 
530.18 557.46 



14.3034 15.0508 
500.62 526.78 
572.14 602.03 



15.4180 16.2701 
539.63 569.45 
616.72 650.80 



16.6633 17.5681 
583.22 614.88 
666.53 702.72 



17.9876 18.9709 
629.57 663.98 
719.50 758.84 



19.4166 20.4654 
679.57 716.29 
776.66 818.62 



20.9767 22.1436 
734.18 775.03 
839.07 885.74 



22.7073 23.9266 
794.76 837.43 
908.29 957.06 



24.4771 25.8014 
856.70 903.05 
979.08 1032.06 



26.4438 27.8728 
925.53 975.55 
1057.75 1114.91 



28.5677 30.1279 
999.87 1054.48 
1142.71 1205.12 



10.7768 

377.19 

431.07 


11.3012 

395.54 

452.05 


11.8387 

414.35 

473.55 


12.3714 

433.00 

494.86 


11.6551 
407.93 
466.20 


12.1796 

426.29 

487.18 


12.7666 

446.48 

510.26 


13.3000 

466.57 

533.22 


12.5337 

438.69 

501.35 


13.1628 

460.70 

526.51 


13.8052 

483.18 

552.21 


14.4264 

504.92 

577.06 


13.5824 

475.38 

543.30 


14.2511 
498.79 
570.04 


14.9067 

521.73 

596.27 


15.5775 

545.21 

623.10 


14.6575 

513.01 

586.30 


15.3785 

538.25 

615.14 


16.0996 

563.49 

643.98 


16.8240 

588.84 

672.96 


15.7850 

552.48 

631.40 


16.5979 

580.93 

663.92 


17.3713 

608.00 

694.85 


18.1530 

635.36 

726.122 


17.0960 

598.36 

683.84 


17.9220 

627.27 

716.88 


18.7218 

655.26 

748.87 


19.5642 

684.75 

782.57 


18.4857 

647.00 

739.43 


19.3509 

677.28 

774.04 


20.2425 

708.49 

809.70 


21.1534 

740.37 

846.14 


19.9279 

697.48 

797.12 


20.8981 
731.43 
835.92 


21.8682 

765.39 

874.73 


22.8522 

799.83 

914.09 


21.4881 
752.08 
859.52 


22.5894 

790.63 

903.58 


23.6381 
827.33 
945.52 


24.7018 

864.56 

988.07 


23.2449 

813.57 

929.80 


24.3724 

853.03 

974.90 


25.5129 

892.95 

1020.52 


26.6609 

933.13 

1066.44 


25.1459 

880.11 

1005.84 


26.3520 

922.32 

1054.08 


27.5450 

964.08 

1101.80 


28.7845 
1007.46 
1151.38 


27.1255 

949.39 

1085.02 


28.4497 

995.74 

1137.99 


29.7738 
1042.08 
1190.95 


31.1136 
1088.98 
1244.54 


29.2624 
1024.18 
1170.50 


30.7047 
1074.66 
1228.19 


32.1336 
1124.68 
1285.34 


33.5796 
1175.29 
1343.18 


31.6749 
1108.62 
1267.00 


33.1956 
1161.85 
1327.82 


34.7166 
1215.08 
1388.66 


36.2788 
1269.76 
1451.15 



33 





Pay Positions 








Group Authorized 


Schedule 


H 


scheciulg 1 - Rpquigr Emp'pvgg? 




.. 




Board of Assessors . 








Deputy Assessor/Appraiser 


Contract ' 1 






Assistant Assessor 


H 1 


7 




Building Department 








Building Commissioner/Zoning Officer 


Contract 1 • 




4 


Clerk 


D 1 


7 




CivlJlan Dispatch 








Communications-Supennsor 


H 1 


1 


'A 


Communications Officer 


F 3 


1 


A 


Communications Officer 


F 1 


1 


1 


Eider Affairs 








Director 


Contract 1 




4 


BderAdvocate 


G 1 


1 


2 


Van Driver 


F 1 


1 


1 


Clerk 


G 1' 


1 


2 


Fire Department 








Fire Chief 


Contract 1 




4 


Captain 


FS - 12 4 


5 


4: 


Firefighter - Paramedic 


FS - 1 1 9 


5 


4: 


Firefighter -EMT 


FS-10 7 


5 


42 


Firefighter- Mechanic 


FS . 10 1 


5 


42 


Private 


FS-09 .3 


5 


42 


Harbor Department 








Harbormaster 


Contract 1 


1 


40 


Health, Board of 








Health Agent 


Contract 1 




40 


Health/Sewer Secretary 


H 1 


7 


40 


Library 








Chief Ubrarian 


Contract . 1 




40 


Staff Uhrarian 


L5 1 


6 


35 


StaffUbrapan 


L5 1 


.6 


32 


Library Assistant 


L4 1 


6 


32 


Library technician 


L3 1 


6 


35 


Library Technidan 


L3 1 


6 


19 


Senior Clerk 


L2 1 


6 


35 


Planning Board/Conservation Commission 




. 




Town Planner 


Contract 1 




. 40 


Secretary 


G 1 


7 


40 


Police Department 








Police Chief 


Contract 1 




40 


Sergeant 


PS - 11 4 


4 


37.5 


Patrolman 


PS -09 14 


4 


37.5 


Secretary 


F 1 


7 


35 


Public Works, Department of 


If 






Superintendent 


Contract 1 




40 


Woridng Foreman 


H 1 


1 


40 


Working Foreman 


1 3 


1 


40 


Master Mechanic/Heavy Equip Operator 


1 . 1 


t 


40 


Heavy Equipment Operator 


G 3 


I 


40 


Skilled Utility Worker 


F • 4 ■ 1 




40 



21 



34 



Public Works, Department of (Cont) 
Tree Climber 
Maintenance Worker 
Skilled UWity Worker- Cemetery 
Clerk 
Recreation 
Director 
Selectmen, Board.of 

Administrative Assistant/Human Resource's 
Secretary/Receptionist 
Director of Finance/Town Accountant 
Director of Finance/Town Accountant 
Assistant Town Accountant 
Administrative Assistant 
Town Cleric 

Assistant Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Tovm Manager 
Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer^Collector 
Assistant Treasurer/Collector 
Assistant to Treasurer 

Schedule 1a - Elected Employees 

Town Clerk 

Clerk, Board of Registrars 

Moderator' . 

Board of Selectmen: 

Chair 

Members (4) at $1,000 
_.oard of Assessors: 

Chair 

Members (2) at $1,200 



Schedule 2a - Part Time Positions Annual 

Veterans' Agent 

Member, Board of Registrars 

Sealer of Weights and Measurers 

Town Archivist 

Director of Emergency Management 

Assistant Director of Emergency Management 

Shellfish Constable 

Animal Control Officer 

Keeper of the Town Clock 

Keeper of the Town Pump 



r 


1 1 


40 


F 


3 1 


40 


E. 


1 1 


40 


G 


1 1 


30 


Contract 




40 


H 


1 1 


40 


F 


1 1 


35 


Contract 




40 


G 


1 7 


21 


G 1 


7 


35 


G 1 


7 


40 


Contract 1 




40 


Contract 1 




40 


H 1 


7 


- 40 


G 1 


7 


25 


552,290 






$329 






$1 






$1,500 






$4,000 






$1,300 






$2,400 






$1,600 






$326 






$2,600 






$600 


^ 




$350 






$100 






$500 






$16,582 






$100 






$100 







2J 



35 



.Schedule 2b - Part Time Positions Houriv ** 
Assistant Harbor Master 
Casuaf Labor 
lection Officers 
election Cterk 
Election Warden 
Summer Patrolman 
Pofice Matron 

Deputy Building Inspector (H-MIn) 
Library Pages 
Recording Secretary 



$10.00 

$6.75 

$6.51 

$8.75 

$9.00 

$14.00 

$13.00 

$14.88 

$8.00 

$10.96 



Schedule 3 - Part Time Positions 

Constable - Per Notice 

Schedule 4 - Infomnational Only 

Police Department 

Schedule 5 - Informational Only 

Fire Department 

Schedule 6 - Informational Only 

Library 

Schedule 7 - Informational Only 

Municipal Clerical and Custodial 

Exempt Posif ons - Per th e Fair Labor Standards Act 



$20.00 
(Collective Bargaining Unit) 
(Collective Bargaining Unit) 
(Collective Bargaining Unit) 
(Collective Bargaining Unit) 



Deputy Assessor Appraiser 
Building Commissioner 
•ector of Finance/Town Accountant 
.Jer Affairs Director 
Rre Chief 
; Harbormaster 
Health Agent 



Chief Ubrarian 

Police Chief 

Recreation Director 

Superintendent of Public Worics 

Town Manager 

Treasurer/Collector 

Town Planner 



2K 



36 



■ 




TOWNOrCQHASSET 






Ik ' 




CAPITAL BUDGET 






|- ' 




FY 2002 TQ FY 2006 






1 












» DEPARTMENT/ITEM 


20021 2003\ 2004 \ 2005 \ 2006 












1 -- 


fin»rdafSel»ctinm 








\ 1 












, 1 


Roconslrucftof) Fiipley RoadOepot Court lnteraec«on 




$20,000.00 1 




1 


Dredpe, James Bfoolc/Smitti Placs io Jacob's Meadow 








$200.000DO| i 


Dredge James BrooWSmtth Place to Bird Sanctuary Pond 






$7^,000.601 


1 .- 


Dredge Bound Brookn'urlle Island to Scjtuata Une 










$1,500,000^)0 


Constouct LHBe League Fields at Gravel Pit 


53aOfiO0J00\ 






1 


Private Ways Repair 


$35,000.00 1 $25,000,001 $25,000.00 1 $25,000.00 1 $25,000.00) 








> 


















Ponce D&}artment 












■ 












Cnitser Replacement Program 


$60,OOQJX) $60,000.00 ( $6O,O0O.OC 


$60,000.00 


$60.000i)0 


PoTtce/Fm Station Renovations 




$4,000,000.00 




















, 






















y?reZ>ej7adniffitf 












■ 












Front Apparatus Ramp 


$25,000.00 










Reftjrt)feh Engine Two 




$100,000.00 








Replace ChleTs Vehicle 








$35,000iX) 


Replace LadderOne vnlh Quint 


$600,000.00 








Replace Protective Gear 


. 


$21,000.00 




■ 




ReplaceHose 


$10,000i» 




$10,000.00 






Replace S.CBA. Units 








$55,000J» 




























\schoolDeoartmerrt 
























J Future Capital Plans at this TTme 
































1 


























Install Sprinkler System on Town Common 






$42,000.00 






GVW Diesel Dump Tmck 


• 


$80,000.00 








Mulii-F>urpose Ride On Machine 


$20,000.00 










One Ton Dump Taick 




$45,0C».00 








Replace 1988 Dump Tnjcic 








■ $45,000.00 




Replace 1 988 One Ton Tmdc 




$35,000.00 








Replace Sand Spreader 






$65,000.00 






Drfll. Blast & Asphalt Area at DPW 






$18,000.00 












1 









































Upgrade OCLN Tenninals 


$12,000.00 


$1Z000.OO 






















' 










GRAND TOTAL 


$542,000.00 $998,000,001 $4,970,000.00 1 $385,000.00 j $1,620,000.00 ( 



I 



2L 



37 



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38 



It was moved to reconsider Article 2 to hear reports of two committees. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

A report on the Master Plan was heard from Clark Bewer and a report on the 
Senior Housing Committee from Dr. Nedrow. 

Article 4: 

To see If the Town will vote to adopt and approve the recommendations of 
the Community Preservation Committee for Fiscal year 2003, and to see If 
the town will vote to implement such recommendations by appropriating a 
sum or sums of money from the Community Preservation Fund established 
pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General Laws, and by authorizing the Board 
of Selectmen, with the approval of the Community Preservation Committee to 
acquire, by purchase, gift or eminent domain such real property interests in 
the form of permanent affordable housing restrictions and historical 
preservation restrictions that will meet the requirements of Chapter 1 84 of the 
General Laws, as may be necessary or proper to carry out the foregoing. 

Moved to divide the question according to the recommendations. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation A: 

Moved that Two Hundred Twenty Eight Thousand One Hundred Sixty Five 
($228,165.00) Dollars be transferred from the Community Preservation Fund 
to the following sub accounts to be administered by the Community 
Preservation Committee in FY 2003: 

Historical Resources Sub Account: $ 65,190.00 

Open Space Sub Account: $ 65,190.00 

Community Housing Sub Account: $ 65,190.00 

Administrative Sub Account: $ 32,595.00 

Total Budget: $228,165.00 

Motion is adopted. 



Recommendation B: 

Moved that Sixty Five Thousand One Hundred Ninety ($65,190.00) Dollars 
be transferred from the Community Preservation Fund Historical 
Resources Sub Account and Eighty Four Thousand Eight Hundred Ten 
($84,810.00) Dollars be transferred from the Community Preservation 
Fund, for a total sum of One Hundred Fifty Thousand ($150,000.00) 
Dollars, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2002 and 
thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purposes of 

39 



investigation, design work, plans and construction work at the Gohasset 
Historical Society's Maritime Museum and Captain John Wilson House to 
address drainage and water Infiltration issues, handicap accessibility, 
restoration of the foundations and all other related work, provided, 
however, that the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to Town 
acquire in return for such sum a historic preservation restriction In 
compliance with Chapter 184 of the General Laws and the specific work 
items be performed with the prior approval of the Community Preservation 
Committee. 

A 2/3 vote is required. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation C: 

Moved that Six Hundred Thousand ($600,000.00) Dollars be appropriated, 
with the Intention that these funds be available in FY 2002 and thereafter, 
to be expended by the Town Manager, for the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire certain property interests in conjunction with private Interests to 
three lots, shown on Assessors Map 27 as Lots 102, 106, and 110, on 
Beach Street adjacent to Brewster Woods, and, that the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, borrow the sum of Six Hundred 
Thousand ($600,000.00) Dollars as general obligations of the Town with 
the intent that the principal and Interest payments are to be paid each year 
from the Community Preservation Fund Open Space Account, subject to 
he following conditions: 

1 . That the debt service period will be fifteen (15) years; 

2. That the property will be owned by the Town; 

3. That a purchase and sales agreement be signed no later than 
March 1,2003; 

4. That the abutting property owners who have offered to encumber a 
portion of their land by a conservation easement or restriction and to allow 
public access to that portion of their property in effect joining it to the new 
park to be created be implemented no later than March 1, 2003; 

That the balance of the purchase price negotiated, plus all fees for 
professional services, including but not limited to attorney's fees as 
deemed necessary by the Town, be paid for by private sources through a 
legal entity; and 

That the negotiations with the current owners of the lots be led by the Town 
Manager and the Community Preservation Committee. 

and further, that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire a 
conservation easement or restriction on the land of abutting property 

40 



owners who have offered to encumber a portion of their land to allow public 
access to that portion of their property. 

A 2/3's vote is required. 

Hand Count - Yes 315; No 119. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Recommendation D: 

Moved that One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars be transferred 
from the Community Preservation Fund, with the Intention that these funds 
be available in Fiscal Year 2002 and thereafter, to be expended by the Town 
Manager to supplement the amount requested under Article 16 of this Town 
Meeting Warrant, to improve, make extraordinary changes, pay for the 
engineering fees, and all other related costs, to construct two ball fields on 
the town owned property known as the "Gravel Pits" located on North Main 
Street. 

Motion adopted. 

Recommendation E: 

Moved that any remaining balance in the Community Preservation Fund in 
Fiscal Year 2003 be retained for future Community Preservation Committee 
recommendations and action by Town Meeting. 

Motion adopted. 

Proclamation offered by Frederick Koed, Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

PROCLAMATION 

RETIREMENT OF HAROLD W. LITCHFIELD 

WHEREAS: On a cold day in December 1934, Harold Litchfield was born 
in a house on Beechwood Street, and; 

WHEREAS: This man made his life with his family, including two 
daughters and two grandchildren, in the house and Town he was born and; 

WHEREAS: He began his career with the Town of Cohasset in the year 
1960 and after years of hard work was elected as Highway Surveyor in 1978 
before becoming DPW Superintendent in 1995 and; 

WHEREAS: During his tenure as head of DPW did he make many 
improvements, such as adding more manpower, taking over the landfill and 
helping to create a new DPW Facility on Cedar Street and; 



41 



WHEREAS: We come upon his retirement with much appreciation and 
sadness, remembering how much fun he made each and every day and; 

WHEREAS: In the words of a great citizen of Cohasset, do we say to 
Harold's request to retire In peace, "Whatever you birds want". 

NOW, THEREFORE; THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN OF THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET 

Acknowledge with great appreciation the dedication and 
contributions that Harold W. Litchfield gave to the Town and residents of 
Cohasset. 

GIVEN under our hands and the seal of the TOWN OF COHASSET this 
thirtieth day of March, in the year Two Thousand and Two. 

Proclamation voted unanimously. 



Resolution offered by Maureen Jerz, Chairwoman of the Advisory Board. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas, Richard Avery, having served on the Advisory Committee for six 
years, and 

Whereas, he has served as chairman of that committee for several years, 
and 

Whereas, he brought wisdom, knowledge and fair-mindedness to the 
Committees deliberations 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the Citizens of Cohasset in Town 
Meeting assembled on this thirtieth day of March 2002 hereby recognize and 
thank Richard Avery for the valuable service he has provided to the Town 
and wish him the best In the future. 

Resolution voted unanimously. 



Proclamation offered by Roseanne McMoms, Member of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

PROCLAMATION 

Retirement of Brian W. Noonan 



42 



WHEREAS: Brian Noonan proudly served his country as a Petty Officer 
Third Class on the U.S.S. Lake Ghamplain from 1964 to 1966 and; 

WHEREAS: His career in Law Enforcement began in 1974 as a 
Patrolman for the Cohasset Police Department and; 

WHEREAS: In 1986 was Sergeant and later was appointed Chief of 
Police in 1993 and; 

WHEREAS: Upon his tenure as Chief did bring forth much advancement 
to the Cohasset Police Department, such as computerizing the Police 
Department, implementing 911, establishing bike patrols, implementing the 
Alarm Bylaw, and Community Policing Programs and; 

WHEREAS: On his retirement not only leaves a long list of 
accomplishments, but also many friends and appreciative co-workers and; 

WHEREAS: Despite all this the one true thing that will be missed is his 
infectious smile and sense of humor. 

NOW, THEREFORE; THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN OF THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET 

Does congratulate Brian W. Noonan on his retirement and thank him 
for his many years of service not only to the Town of Cohasset, but to our 
Country as well 

GIVEN under our hands and the seal of the TOWN OF COHASSET this 
thirtieth day of March, in the year Two Thousand and Two. 

Proclamation voted unanimously. 



Resolution offered by Gary Vanderweil, Chairman of the Sewer Commission. 

RESOLUTION 

Resolved, Whereas Henry Rattenbury served as a citizen on the Sewer 
Advisory Committee assembled in 1982 to work on a cost effective sewer 
plan for the Town, and went on to become a sewer commissioner in 1989, 
and subsequently served as Clerk and Vice Chairman of the Board, and has 
contributed steadily and diligently to the Commission's work, including 
conceptualization and implementation of Cohasset's sewer expansion which 
provided for new sewers in North Cohasset, Central Cohasset, and Lilly 
Pond, and 

Whereas his career allowed him to know most people in town and be served 
as the Commissioner responsible for consumer interface and problem 
resolution during the $25 million sewer expansion project which affected 

43 



1100 consumers, and whereas after spending numerous hours of volunteer 
effort on the Town's behalf he has left the Sewer Commission, 

Now, therefore be It resolved, by the citizens of Cohasset in Town Meeting 
assembled, to express their gratitude and their continued best wishes to 
Henry Rattenbury for 12 years of service to the Commission and the Town. 

Resolution voted unanimously. 

Resolution offered by Richard Flynn, Member of the School Committee. 

RESOLUTION 

WHEREAS, Stephanie Noble has served the Cohasset community as an 
active School Committee member over the past three years, in the roles of 
parent, organizational liaison, lobbyist, contract negotiator, task force 
member, cheerleader, vice-chairman, and chairman and; 
WHEREAS, Stephanie Noble has endeavored to fulfill the needs of our 1370 
students by supporting small class sizes, advocating a grade reconfiguration 
that in time will create a true middle school, and standing up for budgets that 
provide each child with a quality and individual needs-based education and; 
WHEREAS, Stephanie Noble has worked to secure outstanding school 
personnel at both the faculty and administration level, and to hold the 
Cohasset public schools at a level of excellence that is esteemed throughout 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 

Therefore, let It be RESOLVED, that the citizens of the Town of Cohasset, 
assembled here at Annual Town Meeting, on March 30, 2002 do sincerely 
thank Stephanie Noble for her three years of service on the Cohasset School 
Committee; and wish her well as she turns her talents and love for children 
toward a career in education. 

Resolution voted unanimously. 

Article 5: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer from 
available funds, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, needed by various departmental budgets and appropriations to 
complete the fiscal year ending June 30, 2002. 



44 



Department Budget 



Amount Requested 



Pun^ose 



Police Department Salaries $ 35.000.00 

Health Insurance Expense $22,000.00 

Property & Liability Insurance $22,000.00 

Legal Expense $20,000.00 

Fire Department Expenses $3,000.00 

Town Accountant Expenses $20,000.00 

Treasurer/Collector Expenses $25,000.00 

Board of Selectmen Expenses $5,000.00 

Board of Selectmen Expenses $1 5,000.00 
Council on Elder Affairs Expenses $ 15.000.00 



S everance Package 

New E mployees 

B uilding Construction 

Unantic ipated Legal Expense 

A mbulance Supplies 

GA S 34 Implementation 

New Collector's Software 

Cons truct New Meeting Room 

Renov ate Various Memorials 

Replac e CEA Van 

Total $182,000.00 



Moved t hat Two Hundred Two Thousand ($202,000.00) Dollars, to be expended by 
the Town Manager, needed by various departmental budgets and appropriations to 
complete the fiscal year ended June 30, 2002, be transferred as follows: 

Transfer Funds From: 



Surplus Revenue 

School Department Expenses 

DPW Expenses 

Wori<ers' Compensation Insurance 

Pension County Assessment 

Total 



$123,203.00 
$ 10,000.00 
$ 10,000.00 
$ 35,797.00 
$ 23.000.00 
$202,000.00 



Transfer Funds To: 



Police Department Salaries 
Health Insurance Expense 
Property & Liability Insurance 
Legal Expense 
Fire Department Expenses 
Town Accountant Expenses 
Treasurer/Collector Expenses 
DPW Personal Sen/ices 
Board of Selectmen Expenses 
Council on Elder Affairs Expenses 
Total 



45,000.00 
22,000.00 
22,000.00 
20,000.00 
3,000.00 
20,000.00 
25,000.00 
10,000.00 
20,000.00 
$ 15.000.00 
$202,000.00 



Motion Adopted 



Article 6: 



To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 4 of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 
1986 to grant an additional real estate tax exemption of not more than fifty 
(50%) percent. Such additional exemption may be granted to persons who 
qualify for property tax exemption under clauses 17, 17C1/2, 170, 22, 22A, 
22B, 22C, 220. 22E, 37. 37A. 41, 41 B. 41 C, 42, and 43 of Section 5 of 



45 



Chapter 59 of the Massachusetts General Laws, a copy of which is on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

Moved that the Town accept Section 4 of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 to 
grant an additional real estate tax exemption of not more than fifty (50%) 
percent. Such additional exemption may be granted to persons who qualify 
for property tax exemption under clauses 17, 17C>2, 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 
22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 41, 41 B, 41 C, 42. and 43 of Section 5 of Chapter 59 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, a copy of which is on file with the Town 
Clerk. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 7: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow from the Massachusetts Water pollution Abatement 
Trust, or otherwise borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum of sums 
of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to make improvements and 
ail related costs, including architectural and engineering services, of the 
Sewer Treatment Plant located on Elm Street, such borrowing to be general 
obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from 
Sewer Department Revenues. This article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

Moved that One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, to construct 
improvements to the Sewer Treatment Plant located on Elm Street and all 
costs relating thereto, including architectural and engineering services; that 
to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of One Hundred 
Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars, under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town, therefore, such borrowing 
to be general obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be 
repaid from Sewer Department Revenues. This article is intended to take 
effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 



46 



Article 8: , 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2002 and 
thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purposes of 
developing and acquiring engineering design and construction documents, 
construction cost estimates, and permits as may be necessary for the 
provision of the sewer collection infrastructure in the Little Harbor Sewer 
District, and, because engineering investigations have revealed that 
additional capacity at the Cohasset Wastewater Treatment Plant could be 
obtained, to provide similar engineering design for a new District, the Atlantic 
Avenue District, which will complete the sewer servicing between the Little 
Harbor District and the existing Central District, this infrastructure specifically 
intended to serve single and multifamily dwelling units, as defined by current 
zoning regulations in the Districts, which exist as of the date of this vote, 
such properties being identified on lists entitled "Little Harbor Sewer District" 
and the "Atlantic Avenue Sewer District" on file at the office of the Town Clerk 
and at the office of the Sewer Commission, said list differing somewhat with 
respect to the list originally submitted with Article 12 of the March 31, 2001 
Annual Town Meeting when the funds for the study of the Little Harbor 
Sewerage District were originally appropriated; provided, however, that no 
money shall be borrowed under this vote unless the Town shall have voted at 
a regular or special election to exempt the amounts required to pay for the 
bonds issued for the project from the limitations of Proposition two and one- 
half, so called. 

Moved that One Hundred Eighty Thousand ($180,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, with the intention that these funds be available in FY 2002 and 
thereafter, to be expended by the Town Manager, in consultation with the 
Board of Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose of developing collection 
system preliminary engineering documents and corresponding cost 
estimates for the provision of the sewer collection Infrastructure in the Little 
Harbor Sewer District, and, because engineering investigations have 
revealed that additional capacity at the Cohasset Wastewater Treatment 
Plant could be obtained, to provide similar engineering design for a new 
District, the Atlantic Avenue District, which will complete the sewer servicing 
between the Little Harbor District and the existing Central District, this 
infrastructure specifically intended to serve single and multifamily dwelling 
units, as defined by current zoning regulations in the Districts, which exist as 
of the date of this vote, such properties being identified on lists entitled "Little 
Harbor Sewer District" and the "Atlantic Avenue Sewer District" on the file at 
the office of the Town Clerk and at the Office of the Sewer Commission, said 
list differing somewhat with respect to the list originally submitted with Article 
12 of the March 31, 2001 Annual Town Meeting when the funds of the study 
of the Little Harbor Sewerage District were originally appropriated; that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of One Hundred Eighty 

47 



Thousand ($180,000.00) Dollars, under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town, therefore. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 9: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise, temporary and permanent 
easements from all of the abutters and from all those entitled to passage 
rights over lands to be used for the proposed sewer infrastructure expansion 
known as the Little Harbor Sewer District and the Atlantic Avenue Sewer 
District as defined by Article 8 of this Town Meeting, by its related exhibits 
and as shown on a plan entitled, "Preliminary Little Harbor and Atlantic 
Avenue Sewer District Collection Systems" dated March 2002, prepared by 
Tutela Engineering Associates, Inc., a copy of which is on file with the Office 
of the Town Clerk and at the office of the Sewer Commission; said 
easements will be used for the purpose of laying, constructing, replacing, 
improving, or otherwise maintaining sewer collection pipes, pumps, 
appurtenant equipment and storage areas; the specific parcels, or portions 
thereof, over which the easements are to be obtained are all the parcels that 
abut or are serviced by proposed sewer facilities, and, further, to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any 
applicable statutes, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town 
Manager, to accomplish the foregoing. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 10: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners 
to enter into a contract, of no more than twenty years, for the sale of water to 
the Hingham Mass-American Water Company and to make related 
purchases and/or acquisitions of physical assets and related construction; 
and further to amend the water rates adopted at the 1997 Special Town 
Meeting to insert a new rate structure for the sale of water to the Hingham 
Mass-American Water Company and to make other changes in the water 
rates. This article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 
2002. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 



48 



Article 11: 

To see if the Town will vote to request its representatives in the General 
Court to Introduce legislation to authorize the Water Department to provide 
water services to other cities and towns or take any other action related 
thereto and to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to make 
constructive changes in perfecting the language of this legislation In order to 
secure its passage, It being the intent to authorize the General Court with the 
approval of the Board of Water Commissioners to modify the specific text of 
the requested legislation to secure the public policy objectives set forth 
herein, such legislation to read substantially as set forth below. 

AN ACT TO ALLOW THE WATER DEPARTMENT OF THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET TO PROVIDE WATER SERVICES TO OTHER CITIES AND 
TOWNS 

Section 1 . Section 2 of chapter 1 28 of the acts of 1 886, as amended by 

section 1 of chapter 489 of the acts of 1 946 and as further amended by 
chapter 436 of the acts of 1998 is hereby amended by striking the last 
paragraph of said Section 2 and inserting in place thereof the following: 

The Board of Water Commissioners may enter into contracts with or provide 
aid to any city, town, commission, district or company as defined in section 1 
of chapter 165 of the General Laws with regard to the operation, 
administration, repair and maintenance of the water supply system of such 
other city, town commission, district or company. Such contracts may be 
made to provide water to another city or town on an emergency basis, to 
provide water service on a long term basis to one or more residents of 
another city or town, or to provide long-term wholesale sale of water to any 
city, town, commission, district or water company. Any such contract 
authorized by this section shall be for a period of time not to exceed twenty 
(20) years, and shall not become effective unless first approved by a vote of 
the town meeting of the town of Cohasset and approved by a vote of the 
Board of Selectmen If a Town, or by the Mayor If a City, of the community 
where the contract is to be performed. 

Section 2. This Act shall take effect upon passage. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 



49 



Article 12: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 14, "Water Resource District" 
of the Zoning Bylaws by inserting a new Section 14.2A: 



14.2A Definitions 

For the purposes of this Section of the Bylaw, the following terms and words 
are given the meanings stated below. 

Bank . The portion of land surface which normally abuts and confines a water 
body and which lies between a water body and a bordering vegetated 
wetland and adjacent floodplain, or in the absence of these features, it lies 
between a water body and an upland; the upper boundary of a bank is the 
first observable break In the slope or the mean annual flood level; whichever 
is lower, the lower boundary of a bank is the mean annual low flow level. 

Department. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Zone A. Zone A means: 

the land area between the surface of Lily Pond, the Aaron River Reservoir, 
and the tributaries or associated surface water bodies to Lily Pond and the 
Aaron River Reservoir, which includes Bound Brook/Herring Brook, Aaron 
River, Peppermint Brook, and Brass Kettle Brook, and the upper boundary of 
the bank; and 

the land area within a 400 foot lateral distance from the upper boundary of 
the banks of Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir, and 
the land area within a 200 foot lateral distance from the upper boundary of 
the banks of a tributary or associated surface water body to Lily Pond and 
the Aaron River Reservoir, which includes Bound Brook/Herring Brook, 
Aaron River, Peppermint Brook, and Brass Kettle Brook. 
The area of land described In subparagraph (a), (b) and (c) Immediately 
above, is generally depicted on a map entitled "Zone A Delineation" prepared 
by the Norfolk Ram Group, LLC, dated March 2002 and which is on file with 
the Town Clerk. The Zone A areas shown on this map are provided to 
generally depict the above noted limits of the Zone A areas around the 
protected waters, in relation to known parcels of land of record at the 
Cohasset Assessors office. The specific Zone A limits as defined in (a), (b), 
and (c) immediately above (e.g. 200 foot or 400 foot lateral distances) shall 
control in all matters of interpretation of this map. 



And by inserting a new Section 14.3.1(A): 

14.3. 1A Prohibitions within Zone A of Public Drinking Water Supply 

In addition to the uses prohibited in the Water Resource District pursuant to 
Section 14.3.1 , the following uses are prohibited within Zone A: 

50 



All underground storage tanks. 

All above-ground storage of liquid hazardous material as defined in 

Massachusetts General Laws c. 21 E, or liquid propane of liquid petroleum 

products, except as follows: 

Storage is incidental to: 

Normal household use, outdoor maintenance, or the heating of a structure; 

Use of emergency generators; 

A response action conducted or performed in accordance with 

Massachusetts General Laws c. 21 E and 310 CMR 40:000 and which Is 

exempt from a ground water discharge permit pursuant to 315 CMR 5.05 

(14); and 

Storage is within a building, either in container(s) or above-ground tank(s), or 

outdoors in covered container(s) or above-ground tank(s) in an area that has 

a containment system designed and operated to hold either 1 0% of the total 

possible storage capacity of all containers, or 110% of the largest container's 

storage capacity, whichever is greater. However, these storage 

requirements do not apply to the replacement of existing tanks or systems for 

the keeping, dispensing or storing of gasoline provided the replacement is 

performed in accordance with applicable state and local requirements; 

Treatment or disposal works subject to 314 CMR 3.00 or 5.00, except the 

following: 

The replacement or repair of an existing treatment or disposal works that will 

not result in a design capacity greater than the design capacity of the existing 

treatment or disposal works; 

Treatment or disposal works for sanitary sewage if necessary to treat existing 

sanitary sewage discharges in non-compliance with Title 5, 310 CMR 15.00, 

provided the facility owner demonstrates to the Department's satisfaction that 

there are no feasible siting locations outside of Zone A. Any such facility 

shall be permitted in accordance with 314 CMR 5.00 and shall be required to 

disinfect the effluent. The Department may also require the facility to provide 

a higher level of treatment prior to discharge; 

Treatment works approved by the Department designed for the treatment of 

contaminated ground or surface waters and operated in compliance with 314 

CMR 5.05(3) or 5.05(1 3); 

Discharge by public water system or waters incidental to water treatment 

processes.. 

facilities that, through their acts or processes, generate, treat, store or 

dispose of hazardous waste that are subject to Massachusetts General Laws 

c. 21 C and 31 CMR 30.00, except for the following: 

very small quantity generators, as defined by 310 CMR 30.000; 

treatment works approved by the Department designed in accordance with 

314 CMR 5.00 for the treatment of contaminated ground or surface waters; 

sand and gravel excavation operations; 

uncovered or uncontalned storage of fertilizers; 



51 



uncovered or uncontained storage of road or parking lot de-icing and sanding 

materials; 

storage or disposal of snow or ice, removed from highways and streets 

outside the Zone A, that contains de-icing chemicals; 

uncovered or uncontained storage of manure; 

junk and salvage operations; 

motor vehicle repair operations; 

cemeteries (human and animal) and mausoleums; 

solid waste combustion facilities or handling facilities as defined at 310 CMR 

1 6.00; 

land uses that result in the rendering Impervious of more than 15%, or more 

than 20% with artificial recharge, or 2500 square feet of any lot, whichever is 

greater; and 

commercial outdoor washing of vehicles commercial car washes. 

And by amending Section 14.3.2 by striking the first sentence and Inserting in 
place thereof the following: 

The following uses and activities are permitted in the Water Resource 
District, exclusive of the Zone A area, only upon the issuance of a Special 
Permit by the Zoning Board of Appeals ("the Board") under such conditions 
as the Board may require. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 13: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, and to transfer a sum or sums from Article 5 of the November 5, 
2001 Special Town Meeting, for the Water Commissioners to complete 
various water system improvements to the Lily Pond Water Treatment Plant, 
cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital maintenance, 
and other improvements to wells, storage tanks and the water distribution 
system, and measures to protect the sources of public drinking water supply; 
and that to provide said funding the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow a sum of money and to issue 
bonds and notes of the town, therefore, such borrowing to be general 
obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from 
Water Department Revenues; and further that this article is intended to take 
effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

Moved that Three Hundred Ninety Six Thousand One Hundred Fifty Five 
($396,155.00) Dollars be transferred from Article 5 of the November 5, 2001 
Special Town Meeting and that Two Million ($2,000,000.00) Dollars be 
hereby appropriated for a total sum of Two Million Three Hundred Ninety Six 
Thousand One Hundred Fifty Five ($2,396,155.00) Dollars, with the intention 

52 



that these funds be available in FY 2002 and thereafter, for the Water 
Commission to complete various water system improvement projects 
including, but not limited to, improvements to the Lily Pond Water Treatment 
Plant, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital 
maintenance, and other improvements to wells, storage tanks and the water 
distribution system, and measures to protect the sources of public drinking 
water supply; that to fund the Two Million ($2,000,000.00) Dollars 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to borrow Two Million ($2,000,000.00) Dollars under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended, and any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds and notes of 
the Town, therefore, such borrowing to be general obligations of the Town 
with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from Water Department 
revenues. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



Article 14: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II, "Town Meeting, Section 1, 
paragraph (a) of the General Bylaws by deleting the first sentence of Section 
1, paragraph (a) In its entirety and replace it with the following new two 
sentences of Section 1 , paragraph (a): 

The Board of Selectmen shall set the date for the Annual Town Meeting on 
or before December 1^ of the preceding year. The Annual Town Meeting 
shall be held on a Saturday commencing at 10 a.m. in either March or April 
of any year." 

Moved that Article 11, "Town Meeting", Section 1, paragraph (a) of the 
General Bylaws of the Town of Cohasset be amended by deleting the first 
sentence of Section 1 , paragraph (a) in its entirety and replace it with the 
following new two sentences of Section 1 , paragraph (a): 

"The Board of Selectmen shall set the date for the Annual Town 
Meeting on or before December 1st of the preceding year. The Annual Town 
Meeting shall be held on a Saturday commencing at 10:00 a.m. in either 
March or April of any year." 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 15: 

To see If the Town will vote to add the following definition to Section 2.1 of 
the Zoning Bylaw: 



53 



Ledge: A mass of rock, bedrock or moraine projecting above or out of the 
ground which, as of the effective date of Section 1 1 ,3 of this bylaw, has a 
height of eight (8) feet or more as measured from the lowest level of ground 
on the perimeter of the rock, bedrock, or moraine lying within the property 
boundaries of the affected lot vertically to a point even with the highest point 
thereof. 

And further amend Section 11 by adding the following new Section 11.3 
entitled "Removal of Ledge": 

Purpose. The purpose of this Section 1 1 .3 is to protect and preserve natural 

ledge, which is of natural scenic beauty and is one of the unique defining 

characteristics of the Town. 

Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 11.1 and 11.2 immediately above, 

no ledge (as defined in Section 2.1) on a lot may be destroyed, removed or 

altered in any manner. 

The Board of Appeals may authorize by special permit pursuant to this 

Section and Section 12.4, destruction, removal or alteration of ledge provided 

that the board finds that such destruction, removal or alteration. 

Shall not be substantially detrimental to the character of the Town, locale, or 

the neighboring area; and 

Shall not be injurious to adjacent lots because of drainage; and 

Shall not be injurious or dangerous to public safety or neighboring properties. 

Exemptions: Provisions of this bylaw shall not apply to the following 

activities: 

Any municipal project approved at Town Meeting; or 

The construction, installation, or maintenance of public utilities within an 

approved layout, when no other viable option exists; or 

The repair of existing septic systems to the same capacity, for compliance 

with the requirements of the Board of Health. 

Any application for such special permit shall be submitted to the Board of 

Appeals. The application shall be accompanied by a plan of the premises in 

question showing: 

the boundaries and dimensions of the lot; 

the location, dimensions and elevations of existing and proposed structures, 

buildings, driveways, sewage disposal systems, and watercourses thereon; 

the existing contours of the land at one foot intervals referred to mean sea 

level datum certified by a registered professional engineer or registered 

professional land surveyor and any proposed changes therefrom; 

the number of cubic yards of ledge to be altered, removed or destroyed; and 

such other information as is deemed necessary by the Board of Appeals to 

indicate the complete physical characteristics of the proposed construction 

and/or grading. 

Any special permit granted by the Board of Appeals shall be subject to such 
conditions as the Board may impose. 

54 



Moved that the following definition be added to Section 2.1 of the Zoning 
Bylaw after the definition of "Impervious Surface" and before the definition of 
"Loading Space": 

Ledge: A mass of rock, bedrock or moraine projecting above or out of the 
ground which, as of the effective date of Section 11 .3 of this bylaw, has a 
height of eight (8) feet or more as measured from the lowest level of ground 
on the perimeter of the rock, bedrock, or moraine lying within the property 
boundaries of the affected lot vertically to a point even with the highest point 
thereof. 

And, further, that Section 1 1 of the Zoning Bylaw be amended by adding the 
following new Section 1 1 .3 entitled "Removal of Ledge": 

a. Purpose. The purpose of this Section 1 1 .3 is to protect and preserve 
natural ledge, which is of natural scenic beauty and is one of the unique 
defining characteristics of the Town. 

b. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 11.1 and 11.2 immediately 
above, no ledge (as defined in Section 2.1) on a lot may be destroyed, 
removed or altered in any manner. 

c. The board of appeals may authorize by special permit pursuant to 
this Section and Section 12.4, destruction, removal or alteration of ledge 
provided that the board finds that such destruction, removal or alteration: 

1 . Shall not be substantially detrimental to the character of the Town, 
locale, or the neighboring area; and 

2. Shall not be injurious to adjacent lots because of drainage; and 

3. Shall not be injurious or dangerous to public safety or neighboring 
properties. 

d. Exemptions: Provisions of this bylaw shall not apply to the 
following activities: 

1 . Any municipal project approved at Town Meeting; or 

2. The construction, installation, or maintenance of public utilities within 
an approved layout, when no other viable option exists; or 

3. The repair of existing septic systems to the same capacity, for 
compliance with the requirements of the Board of Health. 

e. Any application for such special permit shall be submitted to the 
board of appeals. The application shall be accompanied by a plan of the 
premises In question showing: (1) the boundaries and dimensions of the lot; 
(2) the location, dimensions and elevations of existing and proposed 
structures, buildings, driveways, sewage disposal systems, and 
watercourses thereon; (3) the existing contours of the land at one foot 
Intervals referred to mean sea level datum certified by a registered 
professional engineer or registered professional land surveyor and any 
proposed changes there from; (4) the number of cubic yards of ledge to be 
altered, removed or destroyed; and (5) such other information as is deemed 

55 



necessary by the board of appeals to indicate the complete physical 
characteristics of the proposed construction and/or grading. 
Any special permit granted by the board of appeals shall be subject to such 
conditions as the Board may impose. 



Amendment offered by the Planning Board. Add three words before the 
definition of Ledge. New definition would read as follows: Ledge: That 
segment of a mass of rock, bedrock or moraine projecting above or out of the 
ground which, as of the effective date of Section 1 1 .3 of this bylaw, has a 
height of eight (8) feet or more as measured from the lowest level of ground 
on the perimeter of the rock, bedrock, or moraine lying within the property 
boundaries of the affected lot vertically to a point even with the highest point 
thereof. 

Amendment is adopted. 

Hand count taken on main motion as amended. A 2/3's vote Is required. 

Yes 1 91 ; No 146. Motion is defeated. 

Article 16: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to improve, make 
extraordinary changes, pay for the engineering fees, and all other related 
costs, to construct two ball fields on the property known as the "Gravel Pits" 
located on North Main Street. This article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

Moved that Two Hundred Thousand ($200,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, to improve, make 
extraordinary changes, pay for the engineering fees, and all other related 
costs, to construct two ball fields on the property known as the "Gravel Pits" 
located on North Main Street; that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow 
the sum of Two Hundred Thousand ($200,000.00) Dollars, under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended, or any other enabling authority, and to Issue bonds or notes of the 
Town, therefore. This article is intended to take effect upon passage In 
Fiscal Year 2002. 

A 2/3's vote is required. 

Yes 192: No 61. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

At 5:15 p.m. on motion made and seconded, the Moderator adjourned the 
meeting to Monday, April 1, 2002 at 7 p.m. at the Cohasset High School 
Sullivan Gymnasium. 



56 



MONDAY EVENING APRIL 1, 2002 

Checkers were appointed by the Town Clerk and tellers were appointed by 
the Moderator. The Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:15 p.m. and a 
quorum of 100 was present at that time. The registered voters checked in on 
the voting list totaled Pre. 1 - 127; Pre. 2 - 80. 

Article 17: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII "Safety and Public Order" of 
the General Bylaws of the Town by adding a new section 40 entitled 
"Underground Utility Conversion" as follows: 

Underground Utility Conversion 

Any person, firm, corporation, partnership, their agents and employees, who 
have been granted, or may be granted, any license, permission, or authority 
to construct or maintain poles and overhead wires and associated overhead 
structures upon, along, under, or across any public way or ways, are 
forbidden from installing or constructing, and shall remove immediately, any 
poles, overhead wires and associated structures which are located on, along 
or across the following section of roadway described below. 

Roadway From To 

South Main Street Depot Court Brook Street 

Elm Street South Main Street Brook Street 

Brook street Elm Street South Main Street 

Depot Court Ripley Road South Main Street 

Ripley Road #100 Ripley (Post Office) Depot Court 

Rear Parking Lot James Way Pleasant Street 

Pleasant Street #2 Pleasant (Strawberry Parfeit) Ripley Road 

Violations and Penalties: Any person, firm, corporation, partnership, their 
agents and employees, who fall to remove immediately any poles and 
overhead wires and associated overhead structures in violation of this 
section shall be punished by a fine of not less than one thousand ($1,000) 
dollars and not more than five thousand ($5,000) dollars for each 
consecutive fifteen (15) day period during which this failure continues. 
Removal of Existing Structures; Failure to Comply 

Any utility presently owning poles and overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures along or across any public way or ways within the areas 
outlined In paragraph (a) of this Bylaw, or any part thereof, shall remove the 
same. Said removal shall occur in a sequence specified by the Planning 
Board of the Town of Cohasset after consultation with representatives of the 
utility. 

Any utility which fails to remove any poles, overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures as required by this chapter shall be punished by a fine of 
not less than one thousand dollars and not more than five thousand dollars 
for each consecutive fifteen day period during which this failure continues; 

57 



provided, however, that no utility shall be deemed to have violated this 
section, provided that: 



If replacement of facilities for poles and overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures required to be removed will be needed for the utility to 
continue its service, it shall, within sixty (60) days after the effective date of 
this section, petition the Board of Selectmen for permission to erect or 
construct under the public ways of the Town of Cohasset replacement 
facilities for said poles and overhead wires and associated overhead 
structures; 

It shall prepare and file with the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset 
a plan (which shall be consistent with any removal sequence specified In this 
section) for the removal of such poles and overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures and, If needed for the continuation of its service, for their 
replacement with underground facilities; and 

In each calendar year beginning within the calendar year next following the 
effective date of this section and until all such overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures shall have been removed, the utility shall, in carrying out 
such plan, allocate and expend for the direct cost of demolition and 
construction (over and above the reasonable value of any salvage) an 
amount which shall be not less than two percent (2%) of Its gross revenues 
derived during the preceding calendar year from its customers In said 
municipality; provided, however, it may can^ over as a credit, allocable to 
any one or more of the next nine subsequent years any amount expended in 
any year exceeding said two percent of its gross revenue; and 
It shall on or before the last day of March in each year, file with the Board of 
Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset a statement signed, under the penalties 
of perjury, by its treasurer setting forth in detail the amounts spent by it 
during the immediately preceding calendar year in carrying out said plan, the 
purposes for which such expenditures were made and the gross revenue 
derived from Its customers in said Town of Cohasset during the immediately 
preceding calendar year, provided, however that no utility which enters into a 
cooperation agreement under the provision of Massachusetts General Laws 
C. 166 S 22E, shall be deemed to have violated said ordinance or bylaw 
during the term such payments are to be made, so long as said utility shall 
not be in default of said cooperation agreement. 

Ill This section shall become effective on the first day of January next 

following a date nine months subsequent to the date of its enactment. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 



58 



Article 18: 

To see if the Town will amend the Town of Cohasset Zoning Bylaws as 
follows: 

Under Section 2.1, Insert a new paragraph between "Abandonment " and 
"Alteration" to read as follows: 

"Accessory Dwelling: A separate dwelling unit within a detached one 
family dwelling to be occupied independently of the Principal Dwelling Unit." 

And, under section 4.2 Permitted Uses, insert a new residential use after 
"Dwellings for more than one family including those in combination with 
stores or other permitted uses subject to Table 5.3.1 and 7.1" to read as 
follow: 

Accessory Dwelling Unit within a detached one family dwelling subject to 
Section 15. 

R-ASP; R-BSP; R-C SP; DBSP; WB No; HB SP; LI No; OS No 

And, Insert a new section entitled "Section 15 - Accessory Dwelling Unit 
Special Permit" as follows: 

Section 1 5 - Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit 



15.1 Purpose 

To provide a useful type of housing to meet the needs of residents. 

To protect the stability, property values and character of one family 

residential neighborhoods and help preserve ownership of one family 

dwellings. 

To facilitate the Town's monitoring of the creation of the maintenance of 

Accessory Dwelling Units. 

Special Permit Conditions 

An applicant for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit shall be an owner 
or owners of a detached one family dwelling (House) with at least a 50% 
ownership interest and shall have his/her/their primary residence either in the 
Accessory Dwelling Unit or in the Principal Dwelling Unit within the House. 
The net floor area of the Accessory Dwelling Unit shall not exceed the lesser 
of 25% of the net floor area of the house or 900 square feet. 
The House must have at least 1 200 square feet of net floor area. 
No Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit granted hereunder shall take 
effect sooner than ten years after final occupancy permits are issued for the 
House. 

59 



At least one off street parking space shall be provided for each bedroom in 
the Accessory Dwelling Unit in addition to parking required for the House. 
6. The exterior appearance of the House shall not be altered by the creation of 

the Accessory Dwelling Unit except for stairways and exits as required by law, which 
shall be in the side or rear of the House; and, restoration shall be consistent with the 
original architecture of the House. 

7. Outside storage areas shall be screened by fencing or landscaping. 

8. Only one House may be present on the lot where the accessory 
dwelling is to be located. 

9. Only one Accessory Dwelling Unit may be created within a House. 
10. The lot size must comply with the requirements for a one family 

dwelling as set forth under Section 5.3. This provision shall not apply to 
lawful, pre-existing, non-conforming structures. 

11. To qualify for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit, for a pre- 
existing, non-conforming structure, per Section 8.2, the Accessory Dwelling 
Unit shall be constructed within the living and/or sleeping area of the pre- 
existing structure, shall not be permitted to increase the total square footage 
of the pre-existing structure and shall not alter the footprint of the pre-existing 
structure. 

1 2. Adequate provision shall be made for the disposal of sewage, waste 
and drainage generated by the occupancy of such Accessory Dwelling Unit 
and the House and for an adequate water supply to such Accessory Dwelling 
Unit and the House in accordance with the requirements of the Board of 
Health. 

1 3. The Accessory Dwelling Unit and all other modifications to the House 
shall be designed so that appearance of the House remains that of a one 
family dwelling, and the construction and occupancy of the Accessory 
Dwelling Unit will not be more detrimental to the neighborhood in which the 
House is located or injurious to persons or property than the existing one 
family use. 

14. An Accessory Dwelling Unit shall not be occupied as such unless the 
owner or owners of the House have secured an Accessory Dwelling Unit 
Special Permit pursuant to this section. The special permit will be limited to 
the original applicant(s) and shall terminate upon transfer of ownership of the 
House. 

1 5. The owner shall notify the Building Commissioner in writing, within 6 
months of the lapse In use of the Accessory Dwelling Unit as such. 

16. No special permit shall be granted when more than 10% of the 
single-family dwellings, based on the number of single-family dwellings as 
per Town of Cohasset Assessor records, have an Accessory Dwelling Unit 
pursuant to this section. 

17. No more than ten (10) new Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permits 
shall be issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals in a single calendar year. 

1 5.3 Application Procedure 

1 . An application for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit shall 

include a site plan and floor plan. When the creation of an Accessory 
Dwelling Unit involves exterior alteration of the House, per Section 15.2.6, 

60 



elevation plans shall show the sides of the building affected by the creation of 
an Accessory Dwelling Unit, before and after the construction of the 
Accessory Dwelling Unit. These plans shall include, at a minimum, footprint 
of existing House, location and number of off-street parking spaces, square 
footage of existing House, square footage of proposed Accessory Dwelling 
Unit, and location/means of Ingress and egress from the Accessory Dwelling 
Unit. All plans must be prepared and stamped by a registered professional 
Architect or Engineer. 

2. An application for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit must 
include a notarized letter stating that the applicant will occupy one of the 
dwelling units in the House. Every Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit 
shall include a condition that the applicant will occupy one of the dwelling 
units in the House. 

3. The procedures and requirements stated in this Section 15 for the 
review and approval or denial of an application for an Accessory Dwelling 
Unit Special Permit shall be in addition to the provisions of Section 12.4 of 
this Zoning Bylaw, which provisions shall also apply to an application for an 
Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit." 

Moved that the Town of Cohasset Zoning Bylaws be amended as follows: 

Under Section 2.1, insert a new paragraph between "Abandonment " and 
"Alteration" to read as follows: 

"Accessory Dwelling: A separate dwelling unit within a detached one 
family dwelling to be occupied independently of the Principal Dwelling Unit." 

And, under section 4.2 Permitted Uses, insert a new residential use after 
"Dwellings for more than one family including those is combination with 
stores or other permitted uses subject to Table 5.3.1 and 7.1" to read as 
follow: 

Accessory Dwelling Unit within a detached one family dwelling subject to 
Section 15. 

R-ASP; R-BSP; R-CSP; DB SP; WB No; HB SP; LI No; OS No 

And, insert a new section entitled "Section 15 - Accessory Dwelling Unit 
Special Permit" as follows: 



Section 15 -Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit 

15.1 Purpose 

1 . To provide a useful type of housing to meet the needs of residents. 



61 



To protect the stability, property values and character of one family 

residential neighborhoods and help preserve ownership of one family 

dwellings. 

To facilitate the Town's monitoring of the creation of the maintenance of 

Accessory Dwelling Units. 



Special Permit Conditions 

An applicant for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit shall be an owner 
or owners of a detached one family dwelling (House) with at least a 50% 
ownership interest and shall have his/her/their primary residence either in the 
Accessory Dwelling Unit or in the Principal Dwelling Unit within the House. 
The net floor area of the Accessory Dwelling Unit shall not exceed the lesser 
of 25% of the net floor area of the house or 900 square feet. 
The House must have at least 1200 square feet of net floor area. 
No Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit granted hereunder shall take 
effect sooner than ten years after final occupancy permits are issued for the 
House. 

At least one off street parking space shall be provided for each bedroom in 
the Accessory Dwelling Unit in addition to parking required for the House. 
The exterior appearance of the House shall not be altered by the creation of 
the Accessory Dwelling Unit except for stairways and exits as required by 
law, which shall be in the side or rear of the House; and, restoration shall be 
consistent with the original architecture of the House. 
Outside storage areas shall be screened by fencing or landscaping. 
Only one House may be present on the lot where the accessory dwelling is to 
be located. 

Only one Accessory Dwelling Unit may be created within a House. 
The lot size must comply with the requirements for a one family dwelling as 
set forth under Section 5.3. This provision shall not apply to lav^ul, pre- 
existing, non-conforming structures. 

To qualify for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit, for a pre-existing, 
non-conforming structure, per Section 8.2, the Accessory Dwelling Unit shall 
be constructed within the living and/or sleeping area of the pre-existing 
structure, shall not be permitted to increase the total square footage of the 
pre-existing structure and shall not alter the footprint of the pre-existing 
structure. 

Adequate provision shall be made for the disposal of sewage, waste and 
drainage generated by the occupancy of such Accessory Dwelling Unit and 
the House and for an adequate water supply to such Accessory Dwelling Unit 
and the House in accordance with the requirements of the Board of Health. 
The Accessory Dwelling Unit and all other modifications to the House shall 
be designed so that appearance of the House remains that of a one family 
dwelling, and the construction and occupancy of the Accessory Dwelling Unit 
will not be more detrimental to the neighborhood in which the House is 
located or injurious to persons or property than the existing one family use. 



62 



An Accessory Dwelling Unit shall not be occupied as such unless the owner 

or owners of the House have secured an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special 

Permit pursuant to this section. The special permit will be limited to the 

original applicant(s) and shall terminate upon transfer of ownership of the 

House. 

The owner shall notify the Building Commissioner in writing, within 6 months 

of the lapse in use of the Accessory Dwelling Unit as such. 

No special permit shall be granted when more than 10% of the single-family 

dwellings, based on the number of single-family dwellings as per Town of 

Cohasset Assessor records, have an Accessory Dwelling Unit pursuant to 

this section. 

No more than ten (10) new Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permits shall be 

issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals in a single calendar year. 

15.3 Application Procedure 

An application for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit shall include a 
site plan and floor plan. When the creation of an Accessory Dwelling Unit 
involves exterior alteration of the House, per Section 15.2.6, elevation plans 
shall show the sides of the building affected by the creation of an Accessory 
Dwelling Unit, before and after the construction of the Accessory Dwelling 
Unit. These plans shall include, at a minimum, footprint of existing House, 
location and number of off-street parking spaces, square footage of existing 
House, square footage of proposed Accessory Dwelling Unit, and 
location/means of ingress and egress from the Accessory Dwelling Unit. All 
plans must be prepared and stamped by a registered professional Architect 
or Engineer. 

An application for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit must include a 
notarized letter stating that the applicant will occupy one of the dwelling units 
in the House. Every Accessory Dwelling Unit Special Permit shall include a 
condition that the applicant will occupy one of the dwelling units in the House. 
The procedures and requirements stated in this Section 15 for the review and 
approval or denial of an application for an Accessory Dwelling Unit Special 
Permit shall be in addition to the provisions of Section 12.4 of this Zoning 
Bylaw, which provisions shall also apply to an application for an Accessory 
Dwelling Unit Special Permit." 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 19: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1 2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws by 
striking the sentence: 

"A variance may not authorize a use not otherwise permitted in the district in 
which the land or structure Is located." 

And inserting in its place thereof the following sentence: 

63 



"A variance may authorize a use not otherwise permitted in the district in 
which the land or structure is located, provided that such use is specifically 
permitted in at least one other zoning district by this bylaw; and further 
provided no variance may be granted to allow a sanitary landfill use or other 
solid waste facility use in the Water Resources District established, pursuant 
to Section 14 of this bylaw." 

Moved that Section 12.5 of the Zoning Bylaws be amended by striking the 
sentence: 

"A variance may not authorize a use not otherwise permitted in the district in 
which the land or structure is located." 

And inserting in its place thereof the following sentence: 

"A variance may authorize a use not otherwise permitted In the district in 
which the land or structure is located, provided that such use is specifically 
permitted in at least one other zoning district by this bylaw; and further 
provided no variance may be granted to allow a sanitary landfill use or other 
solid waste facility use in the Water Resources District established, pursuant 
to Section 14 of this bylaw." 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion is defeated. 



Article 20: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3.2 of the Zoning Bylaws, 
"Zoning Map", by striking the following: 

"The Zoning Districts other than the Flood Plain and Watershed District and 
the Water Resource District are shown on a map entitled: "Zoning Map 
Cohasset, Massachusetts, dated October 1, 1969 as revised through March 
2001." The Flood Plain and Watershed Protection District is located as 
shown on a plan entitled "Cohasset and Flood Plain and Watershed 
Protection District", January, 1975, prepared by Richardson and Kalishes, 
Land Use Consultants, as revised by Gale Engineering Inc., November 1976 
with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments thereto. The location 
and boundaries of the Water Resource District, which Is an overlay district 
are shown on a map entitled "Water Resource District, Town of Cohasset, 
Massachusetts, dated March 1986, as revised through March 2001." 

And inserting in its place thereof the following: 

"The Zoning Districts other than the Flood Plain and Watershed District are 
shown on a map entitled: "Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts, Zoning District 

64 



Map dated March 2002," prepared by Amory Engineers, P.C., as revised 
through March 2002 with all explanatory matter thereon and amendmehts 
thereto. The Flood Plain and Watershed Protection District is located as 
shown on a plan entitled "Cohasset and Flood Plain and Watershed 
Protection District January 1975," prepared by Richardson and Kalishes, 
Land Use Consultants, as revised by Gale Engineering Inc., November 1976 
with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments thereto." 

And further to amend section 14.2 of the Zoning Bylaws, "Water Resource 
District: Establishment of District" by striking the following: 

"The water resource district is delineated on the map entitled, "Water 
Resource District, Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts" dated March 1986, as 
revised March 2001 , and on file with the Town Clerk." 

And inserting in its place thereof the following: 

"The water resource district is hereby established as an overlay district. The 
water resource district is delineated on the Zoning Map." 

Moved t hat Section 3.2 of the Zoning Bylaws, "Zoning Map", be amended by 
striking the following: 

"The Zoning Districts other than the Flood Plain and Watershed District and 
the Water Resource District are shown on a map entitled: "Zoning Map 
Cohasset, Massachusetts, dated October 1, 1969 as revised through March 
2001." The Flood Plain and Watershed Protection District Is located as 
shown on a plan entitled "Cohasset and Flood Plain and Watershed 
Protection District", January, 1975, prepared by Richardson and Kalishes, 
Land Use Consultants, as revised by Gale Engineering Inc., November 1976 
with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments thereto. The location 
and boundaries of the Water Resource District, which is an overlay district, 
are shown on a map entitled "Water Resource District, Town of Cohasset, 
Massachusetts, dated March 1986, as revised through March 2001." 

And inserting in Its place thereof the following: 

"The Zoning Districts other than the Flood Plain and Watershed District are 
shown on a map entitled: "Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts, Zoning District 
Map dated March 2002," prepared by Amory Engineers, P.C., as revised 
through March 2002 with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments 
thereto. The Flood Plain and Watershed Protection District is located as 
shown on a plan entitled "Cohasset and Flood Plain and Watershed 
Protection District January 1975," prepared by Richardson and Kalishes, 
Land Use Consultants, as revised by Gale Engineering Inc., November 1976 
with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments thereto." 



65 



And further to amend section 14.2 of the Zoning Bylaws, "Water Resource 
District: Establishment of Districf by striking the following: 

"The water resource district is delineated on the map entitled, "Water 
Resource District, Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts" dated March 1 986, as 
revised March 2001, and on file with the Town Clerk." 

And inserting in its place thereof the following: 

"The water resource district is hereby established as an overlay district. The 
water resource district is delineated on the Zoning Map." 

A 2/3's vote is required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 21: 

To see If the Town will vote to amend Section 3.3.2 of the Zoning Bylaws by 
striking the last sentence of said paragraph, which reads "This allowance 
does not apply to flood plain and watershed protection districts described in 
Section 9 or to the water resource district described in Section 14", so that 
Section 3.3.4 shall now read as follows: "When a district boundary line 
divides a lot that is in one ownership of record at the time such line is 
adopted, a use that is permitted on one portion of the lot may be extended 
fifty feet into the other portion; provided the first portion includes the required 
lot width and depth, and only If the lot has frontage on a street in the less 
restricted district. The Board, however, may authorize by special permit the 
increase of such district to not more than two hundred feet. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 22: 

To see if the Town will vote to approve a petition of the General Court, 
accompanied by the following bill for a Special Law relating to the Town of 
Cohasset under Clause (1 ) of Section 8 of Article 2, as amended, of the 
Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
the end that legislation be adopted precisely as follows, except for clerical or 
editorial changes in form only: 

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A SPECIAL ELECTION IN THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET PERTAINING TO CERTAIN FINANCIAL MATTERS 

Section 1 : Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the Board of 

Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset shall place on a special election ballot 
for approval by the voters of the Town of Cohasset, ail annual and special 

66 



town meeting articles (witli tlie exception of the Operating Budget) pertaining 
to transfers from surplus revenues known commonly as free cash and all 
borrowing articles within the levy limit In excess of $25,000.00. 

Section 2: The special election articles shall be inserted onto the official 

ballot for the next regular election following an Annual Town Meeting, or the 
official ballot for a special election following a Special Town Meeting. 

Section 3: This article shall take effect as to all town meeting warrants 

Issued by the Board of Selectmen after passage of this act. 



CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 

Leiand H. Jenkins 
Marsha L. Silvia 
Karen M. Quigiey 
F. Roy Fitzsimmons 
Richard J. Silvia 



ADDRESS 

98 Jeoisalem Rd. 
445 Beechwood St. 
27 Clay Spring Rd. 
116DoaneSt. 
445 Beechv\/ood St. 



NAME 

Alexander C. Koines 
Raymond Kasperowicz 
Pamela Hill 
M. Richard Hams 
Judith Fitzsimmons 



ADDRESS 

380 Atlantic Avenue 
172 So. Main Street 
380 Atlantic Avenue 
340 So. Main Street 
116 Doane Street 



Moved that the representatives of the Town of Cohasset be requested to 
introduce on behalf of the Town, legislation under Clause (1) of Section 8 of 
Article 2, as amended, of the Amendments to the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to the end that legislation be adopted 
precisely as follows, except for clerical or editorial changes in form only: 

Amendment offered to Insert the word approved after the word articles In 
Section 1 , third line. Section 1 would read as follows. 

Section 1 : Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the Board of 

Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset shall place on a special election ballot 
for approval by the voter of the Town of Cohasset, all annual and special 
town meeting articles approved (with the exception of the Operating Budget) 
pertaining to transfers from surplus revenues known commonly as free cash 
and all borrowing articles within the levy limit in excess of $25,000.00. 

Amendment adopted unanimously. 

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A SPECIAL ELECTION IN THE TOWN OF 
COHASSET PERTAINING TO CERTAIN FINANCIAL MATTERS 

Section 1 : Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the Board of 

Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset shall place on a special election ballot 
for approval by the voter of the Town of Cohasset, all annual and special 
town meeting articles approved (with the exception of the Operating Budget) 
pertaining to transfers from surplus revenues known commonly as free cash 
and all borrowing articles within the levy limit in excess of $25,000.00. 



67 



Section 2: The special election articles shall be inserted onto the official 

ballot for the next regular election following an Annual Town Meeting, or the 
official ballot for a special election following a Special Town Meeting. 

Section 3: This article shall take effect as to all town meeting warrants 

Issued by the Board of Selectmen after passage of this act. 

Main motion as amended is defeated. 



Article 23: 

To see If the Town will vote to approve a petition of the General Court, 
accompanied by the following bill for a Special Law relating to the Town of 
Cohasset under Clause (1) of Section 8 of Article 2, as amended, of the 
Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
the end that legislation be adopted precisely as follows, except for clerical or 
editorial changes In form only: 

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A LOCAL BINDING INITIATIVE PETITION 
PROCESS IN 

THE TOWN OF COHASSET 

Section 1 . The Board of Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset shall insert 

onto the official ballot for the next regular or special election which occurs at 
least thirty (30) days following the date on which the petition is filed with the 
Town Clerk any proposed bylaw, resolution, or order upon written request by 
petition by fifteen (1 5%) percent or more of the registered voters of the Town. 
A petition conforming to the requirements hereinafter provided shall be a 
binding initiative petition, and shall be acted upon as hereinafter provided. 
Section 2. Signatures to initiative petitions need not be all on one 

paper. The paper constituting a petition shall be filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk, with the endorsement thereon of the names and addressees of 
three persons designated as filing the same. With each signature to the 
petition shall be stated the place of residence of the signer, giving the street 
and number, if any. 

Section 3. Within five (5) days after filing of said petition, the registrar of 

voters shall ascertain by what number of registered voters the petition is 
signed, and what percentage that number Is of the total number of registered 
voters, and shall attach thereto their certificate showing the result of such 
examination. The Town Clerk shall forthwith transmit the said certificate with 
the said petition to the Board of Selectmen, and at the same time shall send 
a copy of said certificate to one or more of the persons designated on the 
petition as filing the same. When such certificate has been so transmitted, 
said petition shall be qualified for the ballot. 

Section 4. A proposed measure under this act shall become effective if 

it shall be approved by a majority of the registered voters of the Town of 

68 



Cohasset voting on such measure. Said measure sJiali become effective 
thirty (30) days following said approval, excepting changes to the bylavy/s, 
which shall take effect only upon approval by the Attorney General pursuant 
to Section 32 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

Section 5. The ballots used when voting upon a proposed measure 

under this act shall contain only a fair, concise summary of the measure, as 
determined by the Town Counsel, which shall follow the question, "Do you 
approve of the measure summarized above?" 

Section 6. If two or more proposed measures passed at the same 

election containing conflicting provisions, only the one receiving the greater 
number of affirmative votes shall take effect. 

Section 7. This act shall take effect upon passage. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 

NAME ADDRESS NAME ADDRESS 

Leiand H. Jenkins 1 98 Jerusalem Rd. Alexander C. Koines 380 Atiantic Avenue 

Marsha L. Silvia 445 Beeciiwood St. Raymond Kasperovwcz 172 So. Main Street 

Karen M. Quigley 27 Clay Spring Rd. Pamela Hill 380 Atlantic Avenue 

Roy Fitzsimmons 1 16 Doane St. M. Richard Harris 340 So. Main Street 

Richard J. Silvia 445 Beechwood St. Judith Fitzsimmons 1 16 Doane Street 

Moved that the representatives of the Town of Cohasset be requested to 
introduce on behalf of the Town, legislation under Clause (1) of Section 8 of 
Article 2, as amended, of the Amendments to the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to the end that legislation be adopted 
precisely as follows, except for clerical or editorial changes In form only: 

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A LOCAL BINDING INITIATIVE PETITION 

PROCESS IN 

THE TOWN OF COHASSET 

Section 1 . The Board of Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset shall insert 

onto the official ballot for the next regular or special election which occurs at 
least thirty (30) days following the date on which the petition Is filed with the 
Town Clerk any proposed bylaw, resolution, or order upon written request by 
petition by fifteen (15%) percent or more of the registered voters of the Town. 
A petition conforming to the requirements hereinafter provided shall be a 
binding initiative petition, and shall be acted upon as hereinafter provided. 
Section 2. Signatures to initiative petitions need not be all on one 

paper. The paper constituting a petition shall be filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk, with the endorsement thereon of the names and addressees of 
three persons designated as filing the same. With each signature to the 
petition shall be stated the place of residence of the signer, giving the street 
and number, if any. 

Section 3. Within five (5) days after filing of said petition, the registrar of 

voters shall ascertain by what number of registered voters the petition is 

69 



signed, and what percentage that number is of the total number of registered 

voters, and shall attach thereto their certificate showing the result of such 

examination. The Town Clerk shall forthwith transmit the said certificate with 

the said petition to the Board of Selectmen, and at the same time shall send 

a copy of said certificate to one or more of the persons designated on the 

petition as filing the same. When such certificate has been so transmitted, 

said petition shall be qualified for the ballot. 

Section 4. A proposed measure under this act shall become effective If 

It shall be approved by a majority of the registered voters of the Town of 

Cohasset voting on such measure. Said measure shall become effective 

thirty (30) days following said approval, excepting changes to the bylaws, 

which shall take effect only upon approval by the Attorney General pursuant 

to Section 32 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

Section 5. The ballots used when voting upon a proposed measure 

under this act shall contain only a fair, concise summary of the measure, as 

determined by the Town Counsel, which shall follow the question, "Do you 

approve of the measure summarized above?" 

Section 6. If two or more proposed measures passed at the same 

election containing conflicting provisions, only the one receiving the greater 

number of affirmative votes shall take effect. 

Section 7. This act shall take effect upon passage. 

Motion is defeated. 

Article 24: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to defray a portion of the legal 
costs being born by a coalition of towns including Hull, Hingham and Revere, 
which have filed a complaint against Massport, claiming Inaccuracies and 
misrepresentations in Its runway 14/32 Final Environmental Impact Review. 
This article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Eric Oddleifson 
Cornelia Wakeman 
Samuel Wakeman 
John McManus 
Michael Feit 



25 River Road 
255 Atlantic Avenue 
255 Atlantic Avenue 
19 Forest Notch 
4 Forest Notch 



S. Wiley Wakeman 
Linda Wakeman 
Donna McManus 
Jane Feit 
Peter Leiecas 



255 Atlantic Avenue 
255 Atlantic Avenue 
19 Forest Notch 
4 Forest Notch 
30 Forest Notch 



Moved that Thirty Thousand ($30,000.00) Dollars be transferred from 
Surplus Revenue, to be expended by the Town Manager, to defray a portion 
of the legal costs being born by a coalition of towns including Hull, Hingham 
and Revere, which have filed a complaint against Massport, claiming 
inaccuracies and misrepresentations in Its runway 14/32 Final Environmental 
Impact Review. This article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal 
Year 2002. 



70 



Motion adopted. 
Article 25: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of retaining 
engineers or other professional services to develop a cost estimate and 
construction drawings to reconstruct the sidewalk along Beechwood Street 
from South Main Street up Norman Todd Road and continuing with a new 
sidewalk to meet the existing sidewalk at #131 Beechwood Street. This 
article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 

NAME ADDRESS NAME ADDRESS 

James Madden 44 Beechwood Street Richard P. Kennedy 5 Norman Todd Road 

Lisa A. Swain 7 Nornian Todd Road John F. Elliot Jr. 12 Norman Todd Road 

Karen Biiot 1 2 Nonnan Todd Road BillHildreth 78 Beechwood Street 

William Fusco 8 Nomian Todd Road Maureen O'Brien 4 Norman Todd Road 

Benjamin Leong 1 2 Talarico Lane Linda I. O'Brien 8 Talarico Lane 

Moved that Fifteen Thousand ($15,000.00) Dollars be transferred from 
Surplus Revenue, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of 
retaining engineers or other professional services to develop a cost estimate 
and construction drawings to reconstruct the sidewalk along Beechwood 
Street from South Main Street up Norman Todd Road and continuing with a 
new sidewalk to meet the existing sidewalk at #1 31 Beechwood Street. This 
article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal Year 2002. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 26: 

To see if the Town will vote to accept a Chapter of the Acts of 2002 relating 
to an early retirement incentive for members of the Norfolk County 
Retirement System. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 27: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or transfer from available funds, a sum or sums of money to add 
to the Stabilization Fund in accordance with M.G.L. c. 40, Section 5B, as 
amended. 

Moved that this article be withdrawn from consideration. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

71 



Moved that this meeting stand adjourned only for the election to be held on 
Saturday, April 6, 2002. 

Motion voted unanimously at 9:40 p.m. 

A True Record. ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 



72 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
APRIL 6, 2002 



The polls opened at 8 a.m. and closed at 6 p.m. 
Total Voters— 1243 Per Cent — 24% 

Absentee Voters - - Pre. 1 - 34; Pre. 2 - 25 

Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion Douglas at 7:45 a.m. 
were as follows: 



Carol St. Pierre 


Janice Rosano 




Shirley Tewksbury 


Grace Tuckerman 


Kathleen Rhodes 


Margaret Hernan 


Deborah Protulis 


Ann Barrett 




Debra Krupczak 


Helen King 




Katherine Lincoln 


Louise Flint 




Caria Getto 






SELECTMEN FOR THREE YEARS - 


-VOTE FOR TWO 




Pet. 1 


PcL2 


TOTAL 


Frederick R. Koed 361 


355 


716 


Roseanne M. McMorris 369 


356 


725 


Roger Q. Hill 316 


291 


607 


Write-ins (scattering) 4 


4 


8 


Blanks 228 


201 


429 


Total 1278 


1207 


2185 


MODERATOR FOR THREE YEARS - 


- VOTE FOR ONE 




George L. Mariette; III 458 


418 


876 


Write-ins (scattering) 4 


7 


11 


Blanks 177 


179 


356 


Total 639 


604 


1243 


TOWN CLERK FOR THREE YEARS - 


-VOTE FOR ONE 




Marion L. Douglas 492 


469 


961 


Write-ins (scattering) 


2 


2 


Blanks 147 


133 


280 


Total 639 


604 


1243 



73 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE FOR THREE YEARS - VOTE FOR 1 



Pet. 1 


Pet. 2 


TOTAL 


Frances Jane Pescatore437 


393 


830 


Write-ins (scattering) 1 


13 


23 


Blanks 192 


198 


390 


TOTAL 639 


604 


1243 



TRUSTEE PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY FOR THREE YEARS 
VOTE FOR 3 



Sheila S. Evans 440 
Roger L. Lowe 434 
Roger S. Whitley 458 
Write-ins (scattering) 2 
Blanks 583 
TOTAL 1917 


393 
376 
402 

1 
649 
1821 


833 

810 

860 

3 

1232 

3738 


ASSESSOR FOR THREE YEARS - 


- VOTE FOR 1 




Mary E. Granville 430 
Write-ins (scattering) 
Blanks 209 
TOTAL 639 


366 

3 

235 

604 


796 
3 
444 
1243 


BOARD OF HEALTH - VOTE FOR 1 FOR THREE YEARS — VOTE FOR 1 


Robin M. Lawrence 438 
Write-ins (scattering) 
Blanks 201 
TOTAL 639 


392 
1 
211 
604 


830 
1 
412 
1243 


COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY FOR FIVE YEARS 


; — VOTE FOR 1 


Ralph Perroncello 445 
Write-ins (scattering) 
Blanks 194 
TOTAL 639 


424 

1 

179 

604 


869 

1 
373 
1243 



74 



PLANNING BOARD FOR FIVE YEARS — VOTE FOR 1 



Alfred S. Moore, Jr. 


417 375 


792 


Write-ins (scattering) 


1 3 


4 


Blanks 


221 226 


447 


TOTAL 


639 604 


1243 


RECREATION COMMISSION FOR FIVE YEARS - 


- VOTE FOR 3 


Lillian Murray Curley 


448 398 


846 


Mary k. Muncey 


422 386 


808 


James Richardson 


29 43 


72 


Write-ins (scattering) 


47 58 


105 


Blanks 


1000 969 


1969 


TOTAL 


1946 1854 


3800 


SEWER COMMISSION FOR THREE YEARS - 


- VOTE FOR 1 


Raymond KasperowIcz 


414 373 


787 


Write-ins (scattering) 


4 6 


10 


Blanks 


221 225 


446 


TOTAL 


639 604 


1243 


WATER COMMISSION 


1 FOR THREE YEARS 


-VOTE FOR 


Glenn A. Pratt 


459 436 


895 


Write-ins (scattering) 


3 


3 


Blanks 


180 165 


345 


TOTAL 


639 604 


1243 


QUESTION 







Shall the Town of Cohasset be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition two and one-half, so called, the amounts required to pay for the 
bonds issued in order to pay for the engineering design and construction 
documents, construction cost estimates, and permits as may be necessary 
for the collection infrastructure in the Little Harbor Sewer District and the 
Atlantic Avenue Sewer District? 



Pet. 1 



Pet. 2 



TOTAL 



Yes 


269 


150 


419 


No 


205 


287 


492 


Blanks 
TOTAL 


165 
639 


167 
604 


332 

1243 



75 



The polls closed at 6 p.m. and the results were declared at 7 p.m. 
A True Record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 17, 2002 



Polls opened at 7 a.m. and closed at 8 p.m. 
Total Voters - 1610. Democrats - 854, Republicans 
Thirty one percent voted which includes absentees. 
Absentees - Pre. 1 - 25; Pre. 2-50. 



752, Libertarians -4. 



Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marlon Douglas, at 6:45 a.m. 
were as follows: 



Carol St.Pierre 
Shirley Tewksbury 
Jean Thompson 
Grace Tuckerman 
Katherine Lincoln 
Debra Krupczak 
Helen King 

Democratic Party - 854 

Senator in Congress Pre. 1 



Janice Rosano 
Janet MacLure 
Kathleen Rhodes 
Margaret Hernan 
Caria Getto 
Nancy Barrett 



Pre. 2 



Total 



John F. Kerry 


354 


338 


692 


Scattering 


2 


3 


5 


Blanks 


m 


87 


157 


Total 


426 


428 


854 


Governor 








Thomas F. Birminghan- 


I 66 


78 


144 


Steven Grossman 





3 


3 


Shannon P. O'Brien 


143 


164 


307 


Robert B. Reich 


134 


91 


225 


Warren E. Tolman 


76 


85 


161 


Scattering 


1 


1 


2 


Blanks 


6 


6 


12 



76 



Total 426 428 854 

Lieutenant Governor Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 



Christopher F. Gabriell 

Lois G. Pines 

John P. Slattery 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


156 

128 

78 



64 

426 


183 

100 

97 

2 

46 
428 


339 
228 
175 
2 
110 
854 


Attorney General 








Thomas F. Reilly 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


325 
3 

98 
426 


309 

1 

118 

428 


634 

4 

216 

854 


Secretary of State 








William Francis Galvin 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


301 
2 

123 
426 


297 

131 
428 


598 

2 

254 

854 


Treasurer 








Michael P. Cahill 

Timothy P. Cahill 

Stephen J. Murphy 

James W. Segel 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


38 

197 

49 

76 

1 

65 

426 


36 
231 
39 
67 


55 
428 


74 
428 
88 
143 
1 
120 
854 


Auditor 








A. Joseph DeNucci 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


279 
2 

145 
426 


279 



149 

428 


558 

2 

294 

854 


Representative in Congress 
William D. Delahunt 325 
Scattering 1 
Blanks 100 


326 

1 

101 


651 

2 

201 



77 



Total 



426 



428 



854 



Councillor 



Christopher A. lannella, Jr.166 
Stephen F. Flynn 148 

Scattering 

Blanks 112 

Total 426 



150 
171 

107 
428 



316 
319 

219 
854 



Senator in General Court 



Ted LeClair 
Scattering 
Blanks 
Total 



283 


143 
426 



294 

1 

133 

428 



577 

1 

276 

854 



Representative in General Court 



Garrett J. Bradley 


345 


351 


696 


Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


1 

80 

426 




77 

428 


1 
157 
854 


District Attorney 








William R. Keating 


283 


283 


566 


Scattering 
Blanks 


1 
142 


1 

144 


2 

286 


Total 


426 


428 


854 


Register of Probate 








Patrick W. McDermott 


121 


123 


244 


Mark H. Tobin 


173 


182 


355 


Scattering 
Blanks 


1 
131 




123 


1 

254 


Total 


426 


428 


854 


County Treasurer 








Joseph A. Connolly 
Michael J. Joyce 


117 
117 


159 
110 


276 
227 


Thomas P. Koch 


54 


50 


104 


Scattering 
Blanks 



138 



109 



247 



78 



Total 426 428 854 



County Commissioner 

Peter H. Collins 263 270 533 

Scattering 

Blanks 163 158 321 

Total 426 428 854 



Republican Party 
Senator in Congress 



Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


25 

404 
429 


26 
297 
323 


51 
701 
752 


Governor 








Mitt Romney 
Scattering 
Blanks 
Total 


393 
3 

33 
429 


294 
2 
27 

323 


687 
5 
-60 
752 



Lieutenant Governor 



Kerry Murphy Healy 

Jim Rappaport 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


293 

133 



3 

429 


210 

108 



5 

323 


503 

241 



8 

752 


Attorney General 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


17 

412 

429 


19 
304 
323 


36 
716 
752 


Secretary of State 








Jack E. Robinson, III 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


179 
3 

247 
429 


160 

1 

162 

323 


339 

4 

409 

752 



79 



Treasurer 



Daniel A. Grabauskas 54 


46 


100 


Bruce A. Herzfelder 357 


250 


607 


Scattering 
Blanks 



18 



27 



45 


Total 


429 


323 


752 


Auditor 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


9 

420 

429 


11 
312 
323 


20 

732 
752 


Representative in 


Congress 






Luiz Gonzaga 

Scattering 

Blanks 


222 


207 


179 

1 

143 


401 
1 
350 


Total 


429 


323 


752 


Councillor 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


12 

417 
429 


13 
310 
323 


25 
727 
752 


Senator In General Court 






Robert L. Hedlund 


354 


273 


627 


Scattering 
Blanks 


1 
74 


1 
49 


2 

123 


Total 


429 


323 


752 



Representative in General Court 



Nathaniel G. Palmer 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


328 
1 

100 
429 


249 

2 

72 

323 


577 

3 

172 

752 


District Attorney 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


8 

421 

429 


12 
311 
323 


20 

732 
752 



80 



Register of Probate 








Richard P. Schmidt 

Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


256 


173 
429 


204 

1 

118 

323 


460 

1 

291 

752 


County Treasurer 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


9 

420 

429 


14 
309 
323 


23 
729 
752 



County Commissioner 



Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


7 

422 

429 


12 
311 
323 


19 
733 
752 


Libertarian Party - 4 








Senator in Congress 








Michael E. Cloud 


1 


3 


4 


Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 





1 




3 




4 


Governor 








Caria A. Howell 


1 


3 


4 


Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 





1 




JO 
. 3 




4 


Lieutenant Governor 








Richard P. Aucoin 


1 


3 


4 


Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 





1 




3 



4 



81 



Attorney General 



Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 



Secretary of State 



Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 



Treasurer 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 

















Auditor 








Kamal Jain 


1 


3 


4 


Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 





1 




3 





4 



Representative in Congress 



Scattering 
Blanks 












Total 











Councillor 








Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 









Q 







Senator in ( 


3eneral Court 






Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 




Q 














82 



Representative in General Court 



Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 




Q 














District Attorney 








Scattering 
Blanks 




Q 










Total 











Register of Probate 

Scattering 

Blanks 



Q 








Total 











County Treasurer 








Scattering 
Blanks 














Total 











County Commissioner 








Scattering 
Blanks 












Total 












Massachusetts Green Party - 
Senator In Congress 






Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 









_o 








Governor 








Jill E. Stein 











Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 

















83 



Lieutenant Governor 



Anthony F. Lorenzen 











Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











Attorney General 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











Secretary of State 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











Treasurer 








James O'Keefe 











Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











Auditor 








Scattering 











Blanks 





_Q 





Total 











Representative in Congress 






Scattering 











Blanks 


Q 


Ov 





Total 











Councillor 








Scattering 











Blanks 


Q 








Total 












84 



Senator in General Court 



Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 












Representative In General Court 



Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











District Attorney 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











Register of Probate 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











County Treasurer 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 











County Commissioner 








Scattering 











Blanks 











Total 












The polls closed at 8 p.m. and the results were declared at 9:45 p.m. 

A True Copy, Attest: 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 



85 



RECOUNT - SEPTEMBER 29. 2002 



The Board of Registrars scheduled a recount for the position of Norfolk 
County Treasurer (Democratic) at 9 am at the Cohasset Town Hall 
Auditorium on Sunday, September 29, 2002. Registrars present were: 
Margaret Charles, Chairwoman, Judith Volungis, Marion Douglas, Clerk, and 
Edythe Ford. 

The following election workers assisted In the recount were: Carol St. Pierre, 
Janice Rosano, Kathleen Rhodes, Margaret Hernan, Debra Krupczak, Nancy 
Barrett, and Caria Getto. 

Joseph Connolly Informed the Town Clerk that Michael Joyce had conceded 
to him on Saturday, September 28, 2002. After discussion, it was decided to 
proceed with the recount, as the Town Clerk had nothing in writing 
requesting that the recount be discontinued. No observers or counsels were 
present for the candidates. 

As determined by the recount, the votes cast for the office of Norfolk County 
Treasurer were as follows: 



Pre. 1 



Pre. 2 



TOTAL 



County Treasurer 








Joseph A. Connolly 


118 


161 


279 


Michael J. Joyce 


117 


111 


228 


Thomas P. Koch 


54 


51 


105 


Scattering 











Blanks 


137 


105 


242. 


Total 


426 


428 


854 



A True Record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 
Clerk for the Board of Registrars 



86 



November 5, 2002 - State Election 

Polls opened at 7 a.m. and closed at 8 p.m. 

Total voters - 3740. Per Cent - 71 . Total absentee voters - 232. . 

Election officers sworn in by Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 6:45 a.m. 
were as follows: 



Carol St. Pierre 


Janice Rosano 




Caria Getto 


Margaret Hernan 


Janet MacLure 


Kathleen Rhodes 


Shirley Tewksbury 


Jean Thompson 


race 


Tuckerman 


Nancy Barrett 




Debra Krupczak 


Helen King 




Senator in Congress 


Pre! 


Pre 2 


Total 


John F. Kerry 


1210 


1183 


2393 


Michael E. Cloud 


425 


373 


797 


Randall Forsberg 


27 


21 


48 


Write-ins/scattering 


6 


4 


10 


Blanks 


277 


214 


491 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Governor & Lt. Governor 






Howell & Aucoin 


11 


8 


19 


O'Brien & Gabriel! 


557 


549 


1106 


Romney & Healey 


1310 


1186 


2496 


Stein & Lorenzen 


55 


37 


92 


Johnson & Schebel 


4 


9 


13 


Write-ins/scattering 


2 


1 


3 


Blanks 


5 


5 


10 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Attorney General 








Thomas F. Reilly 


1261 


1182 


2443 


Write-ins/scattering 


13 


19 


32 


Blanks 


671 


594 


1264 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Secretary of State 


Prel 


Pre 2 


Total 



William Francis Galvin 1 1 36 
Jack E. Robinson, III 605 
Write-ins/scattering 



1066 
512 
3 



2202 

1116 

3 



87 



Blanks 


204 


214 


418 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Treasurer 








Timothy P. Cahlll 


752 


749 


1501 


Daniel A. Grabauskas 


1045 


884 


1929 


James O'Keefe 


51 


59 


110 


Write-ins/scattering 











Blanks 


96 


103 


199 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Auditor 








A Joseph DeNucci 


1185 


1124 


2309 


Kamal Jain 


139 


116 


255 


John James Xenakis 


225 


220 


445 


Write-ins/scattering 


4 


2 


6 


Blanks 


391 


333 


724 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Representative in Congress 






William D. Delahunt 


1140 


1099 


2239 


Luiz Gonzaga 


678 


581 


1259 


Write-ins/scattering 





2 


2 


Blanks 


126 


113 


239 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Councillor 








Christopher A. lanella, Jr. 1068 


1006 


2074 


Write-ins/scattering 


13 


12 


25 


Blanks 


864 


777 


1640 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 



Senator in General Court 

Robert L Hedlund 1282 1157 2438 

TedLeClair 585 584 1169 

Write-ins/scattering 

Blanks _78 _54 132 

Total 1945 1795 3740 

Representative in General Court 

Garrett J. Bradley 956 1000 1956 

Nathaniel G. Palmer 911 743 1 653 

Write-ins/scattering 

88 



Blanks 
Total 


78 

1945 


District Attorney 




William R. Keating 

Write-ins/scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


1150 
12 
783 
1945 


Register of Probate 




Patrick W. McDermott 

Richard P. Schmidt 

Write-ins/scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


722 
915 


857 
1945 


County Treasurer 




Joseph A. Connolly 

Write-ins/scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


1080 
8 

857 
1945 


County Commissioner 




Peter H. Collins 

Write-ins/scattering 

Blanks 

Total 


1070 
8 
867 
1945 


Question 1 





52 130 

1795 3740 



1076 2226 

13 25 

706 1488 

1795 3740 



684 1406 

822 1736 



754 1610 

1795 3740 



1028 2108 

13 21 

754 1610 



1795 3740 



1014 2084 

13 21 

768 1634 

1795 3740 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by 
the House of Representatives before May 1, 2002? 
Summary: This proposed law would provide that no income or other gain 
realized on or after July 1, 2003, would be subject to the state personal 
income tax. That tax applies to income received or gain realized by 
Individuals and married couples, by estates of deceased persons, by certain 
trustees and other fiduciaries, by persons who are partners in and receive 
income from partnerships, by corporate trusts, and iDy persons who receive 
income as shareholders of "S corporations" as defined under federal tax law. 
The proposed law would not affect the tax due on income or gain realized 
before July 1 , 2003. The proposed law states that if any of its parts were 
declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would eliminate any state personal income tax for income or 
other gain realized on or after July 1 , 2003. 

89 



A NO VOTE would make no change in state tax laws. 





Pre. 1 


Pre. 2 


Total 


Yes 


991 


862 


1853 


No 


778 


795 


1572 


Blanks 


867 


768 


1634 


Total 


1945 


1795 


3740 


Question 2 









Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by 
the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 1 , 2002? 
Summary: The proposed law would replace the current law providing for 
transitional bilingual education in public schools with a law requiring that, with 
limited exceptions, all public school children must be taught English by being 
taught all subjects In English and being placed in English language 
classrooms. 

The proposed law would require public schools to educate English learners 
(children who cannot do ordinary class work in English and who either do no 
speak English or whose native language is not English) through a sheltered 
English immersion program, normally not lasting more than one year. In the 
program, all books and nearly all teaching would be in English, with the 
curriculum designed for children learning English, although a teacher could 
use a minimal amount of a child's native language when necessary. Schools 
would be encouraged to place in the same classroom children who are from 
different native-language groups but who have the same level of English 
skills. Once a student is able to do regular schoolwork in English, the 
student would be transferred to an English language mainstream classroom. 
These requirements would not affect special education programs for 
physically or mentally impaired student or foreign language classes for 
children who already know English. 

Parents or guardians of certain children could apply each year to have the 
requirements waived, so as to place their child in bilingual education or other 
classes. If the parents or guardians visit the school to be informed, in a 
language they can understand, about all available options. To obtain a 
waiver, the child must either (1) already know English; or (2) be at least 10 
years old and the school principal and staff believe that another course of 
study would be better for the child's educational progress and rapid learning 
of English; or (3) have special physical or psychological needs (other than 
lack of English skills), have already spent 30 days in an English language 
classroom during that school year, the school principal and staff document 
their belief that the child's special needs make another course of study better 
for the child's educational progress and rapid learning of English, and the 
school superintendent approves the waiver. If 20 or more students in one 
grade level at a school receive waivers, the school would have to offer either 
bilingual education classes providing instruction in both the students native 
language and English or classes using other generally recognized 

90 



educational methodologies permitted by law. In other cases, a student 
receiving a waiver would have to be allowed to transfer to a school offering 
such classes. 

A parent or guardian could sue to enforce the proposed law and, if 
successful, would receive attorney's fees, costs and compensatory money 
damages. Any school employee, school committee member or other elected 
official or administrator who willfully and repeatedly refused to implement the 
proposed law could be personally ordered to pay such fees, costs, and 
damages, could not be reimbursed for that payment by any public or private 
party; and could not be elected to a school committee or employed in the 
public schools for 5 years. Parents or guardians of a child who received a 
waiver based on special needs could sue if, before the child reached age 18, 
they discover that the application for a waiver was induced by fraud or 
intentional misrepresentation and injured the child's education. 
All English learners in grades kindergarten and up would take annual 
standardized tests of English skills. All English learners in grades 2 and up 
would take annual written standardized tests, in English, of academic 
subjects. Severely learning disabled students could be exempted from the 
tests, Individual scores would be released only to parents, but aggregate 
scores, school and school district rankings, the number of English learners in 
each school and district, and related date would be made public. 
The proposed law would provide, subject to the state Legislature's 
appropriation, $5 million each year for 10 years for school committees to 
provide free or low-cost English language instruction to adults who pledged 
to tutor English learners. 

The proposed law would replace the current law, under which a school 
committee must establish a transitional bilingual education program for any 
20 or more enrolled children of the same language group who cannot do 
ordinary class work in English and whose native language is not English or 
whose parents do not speak English. In that program, schools must teach all 
required courses in both English and the child's native language; teach both 
the native language and English; and teach the history and culture of both 
the native land of the child's parents and the United States. Teaching of non- 
required subjects may be in a language other than English, and for subjects 
where verbalization is not essential (such as art or music), the child must 
participate in regular classes with English-speaking students. 
Under the current law, a child stays in the program for 3 years or until the 
child can perform successfully in English-only classes, whichever occurs first. 
A test of the child's English skills is given each year. A school committee 
may not transfer a child out of the program before the third year unless the 
parents approve and the child has received an English-skills test score 
appropriate to the child's grade level. A child may stay in the program longer 
than 3 years if the school committee and the parent or guardian approve. 
Parents must be informed of their child's enrollment in the program and have 
the right to withdraw their child from the program. 

The proposed law's testing requirements would take effect immediately, and 
its other requirements would govern all school years beginning after the 



91 



proposed law's effective date. The proposed law states that If any of its parts 

were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would require that, with limited exceptions, all public school 

children must be taught English by being taught all subjects in English and 

being place in English language classrooms. 

A NO VOTE would make no changes in English language education In public 

schools. 

Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 



Yes 


1307 


1225 


2531 


No 


411 


390 


801 


Blanks 


227 


180 


407 



Total 1945 1795 3740 



Question 3 

Do you support taxpayer money being used to fund political campaigns for 
public office In the Commonwealth of Massachusetts? 

Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 



Yes 


495 


410 


905 


No 


1194 


1181 


2375 


Blanks 


256 


204 


460 



Total 1945 1795 3740 

Results were declared at 9:30 p.m. 

Polls closed at 8 p.m. 
A True Record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



92 



INDEX SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 18, 2002 

Article Descriptions 

1 Unpaid bills. Adopted unanimously. 

2 Departmental transfers. Adopted unanimously. 

3 Citizens' petition - Affordable Housing. Adopted 
unanimously. 

4 Citizens' petition - 40B Moratorium. Adopted. 

5 Community Preservation Recommendation to repair gates at 
Beechwood Cemetery. Adopted unanimously. 

6 Purchase Bames Property. Adopted unanimously. 

7 Bames Property - Conservation Restriction. Adopted 
unanimously. 

8 Zoning Bylaw amendment - Senior Multi-Family District. 
Adopted. 

9 Police/Fire Station drawings & bid documents. Adopted. 

10 Stabilization Fund. Adopted unanimously. 

1 1 Forest Ave. sidewalk additional funding. Motion defeated . 

12 Private Way repair account. Adopted. 

13 Streetscape Improvements in downtown village area. 
Adopted. 

14 Contract for Wastewater Plant. Adopted unanimously. 

15 Expand senior tax exemptions. Adopted unanimously. 

16 Improve James Brook Flood Control. Adopted unanimously. 

17 Harbor Improvement proposed by Village 
Revitalization. Motion defeated. 

18 Repairs to Sea Wall. Adopted unanimously. 



93 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 18, 2002 

At the Special Town Meeting held on Monday, November 18 2002 at the 
Cohasset High School Gymnasium the following articles were contained in 
the warrant and acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 6:30 p.m. were 
Carol St. Pierre, Janice Rosano, Nancy Barrett, Margaret Hernan and Debra 
Krupczak. Tellers were appointed and sworn in by the Moderator, George L. 
Marlettelll. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:05 p.m. and a quorum of 100 
was present at that time. The registered voters checked in on the voting list 
totaled for Precinct 1 - 338; and Precinct 2 - 192 for a total of 530 voters. 

Voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting 
and Return of Service having been examined by the Moderator and found to 
be In order. 



Article 1 : 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay for unpaid bills from 
previous fiscal years. 

VENDOR AMOUNT REQUESTED 

Deutsch, Williams Brooks, DeRensis $37.782.00 

TOTAL $37,782.00 

Moved t hat Thirty Seven Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty Two ($37,782.00) 
Dollars be raised by taxation and other general revenues of the Town, to be 
expended by the Town Manager, to pay the following unpaid bills from 
previous fiscal years: 

Deutsch, Williams Brooks, DeRensis $37.782.00 

TOTAL $37,782.00 

A 9/10 vote is required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



94 



Article 2: 

To see what additional action the Town will vote to amend, modify, increase 
or decrease, or otherwise to balance the Fiscal Year 2003 Operating Budget 
as voted in Article 3 of the March 30, 2002 Annual Town Meeting and to see 
what additional sums the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from 
available funds or othenA^ise, for the payment of the salaries and 
compensation, expenses, equipment and outlays, capital and otherwise, of 
the several Town Departments, for the current fiscal year. 



Dept 

Original 
No. Appropriation Account Appropriation 


Revised 
Appropriation 


increase/ 
Decrease 


Director of Rnance/Town Accountant 






Personal Sen/ices 


$80,400.00 


$82,900.00 


$2,500.00 


Planning Board 








Payroll & General Expenses 


$68,930.00 


$83,930.00 


$15,000.00 


Legal Budget 








General Expenses 


$ 150,000.00 


$ 177,500.00 


$27,500.00 


Police Department 








Personal Sen/ices 


$1,482,019.00 


$1,552,019.00 


$70,000.00 


Cohasset Public Schools 








General Expenses 


$ 10,743,555.00 


$ 10,843.555.00 


$ 100,000.00 


South Shore VoTech School 








Regional Assessment 


$60,000.00 


$79,280.00 


$19,280.00 


Department of Public Wori<s 








General Expenses 


$ 535,380.00 


$ 570,380.00 


$35,000.00 


Sewers 








General Expenses 


$ 758.662.00 


$646,606.00 


($112,056.00) 


Benefits and Insurance 








Health Insurance 


$1,476,160.00 


$1,536,160.00, 


$60,000.00 


Total 


$15,355,106.00 


$15,572,330.00 


$217,224.00 



95 



jyioved that the Town vote to amend, modify, increase or decrease, or 
otherwise, to balance the Fiscal Year 2003 Operating Budget as voted in 
Article 3 of the March 30, 2002 Annual Town Meeting, by decreasing the 
amount appropriated from taxation and other general revenues of the Town 
by One Hundred Twelve Thousand Fifty Six ($112,056.00) Dollars from 
Twenty Six Million Seven Hundred Thirty One Thousand Nine Hundred 
Seventy Nine ($26,731,979.00) Dollars to Twenty Six Million Six Hundred 
Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Twenty Three ($26,619,923.00) Dollars 
and to transfer the sum of Three Hundred Twenty Nine Thousand Two 
Hundred Eighty ($329,280.00) Dollars from Surplus Revenue, for the 
additional payment of the salaries and compensation, expenses, equipment 
and outlays, capital and otherwise, of the several town departments, for the 
current fiscal year as follows: 



96 



Sewers 

General Expenses 
Benefits and Insurance 
Health Insurance 



$150,000.00 



DepL 

Original 
No. Appropriation Account Appropriation 

Director of Finance/Town Accountant 

Personal Services $80,400.00 $ 

Planning Board 

Payroll & General Expenses $68,930.00 $ 

Legal Budget 

General Expenses 

Police Department 

Personal Services 

Cohasset Public Schools 

General Expenses 

South Shore VoTech School 

Regional Assessment $60,000.00 

Department of Public Works 

General Expenses 



$535,380.00 



Revised Increase/ 

Appropriation Decrease 



82,900.00 



83,930.00 



$79,280.00 



$2,500.00 



$15,000.00 



$177,500.00 $27,500.00 



$1,482,019.00 $1,552,019.00 $70,000.00 



$10,743,555.00 $10,843,555.00 $100,000.00 



$19,280.00 



$570,380.00 $35,000.00 



$758,662.00 $646,606.00 ($112,056.00) 



$1,476,160.00 $1,536,160.00 $60,000.00 



Total 



$15,355,106.00 



$15,572,330.00 $217,224.00 



Motion adopted unanimously. 



97 



Article 3: 

To see if the Town will vote to direct appropriate Town boards to create and 
implement an affordable housing plan that is consistent with the needs of the 
Town and will meet state affordable housing obligations. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 



Name 

Michael Westcott 
Monique Smith 
Justine Vanderlugt 
Thomas Powers 
Leslie Bryan 



Address 

2 River Road 
255 Pond Street 
344 King Street 
25 Powers Lane 
20 Sanctuary Pond Rd 



Name 

Douglas Bryan 
Kathleen Anderson 
Lori Langenhagen 



Address 

20 Sanctuary Pond Rd 
25 Sanctuary Pond Rd 
24 Sanctuary Pond Rd 



Conrad Langenhagen 24 Sanctuary Pond Rd 
Diane J. Dutton 26 Sanctuary Pond Rd 



MOVED: that the Cohasset Housing Authority, the Cohasset Growth and 
Development Committee, and the Cohasset Planning Board be hereby 
requested to work towards creating and Implementing a Town of Cohasset 
Affordable Housing Plan by January 1, 2003, that Is consistent with the 
Town's need and meets State affordable housing requirements, if any, 
applicable to the Town of Cohasset. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 
Article 4: 

To see if the Town will vote adopt a moratorium on Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 40B development projects until the Town has adopted and 
implemented an affordable housing plan. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 



Name 

Michael Westcott 
Monique Smith 
Justine Vanderlugt 
Thomas Powers 
Leslie Bryan 



Address 

2 River Road 

255 Pond St 

344 King Street 

25 Powers Lane 

20 Sanctuary Pond Rd . 



Name 



Address 



Douglas Bryan 20 Sanctuary Pond Rd. 

Kathleen D. Anderson 25 Sanctuary Pond Rd. 
Lori Langenhagen 24 Sanctuary Pond Rd. 
Conrad Langenhagen 24 Sanctuary Pond Rd. 
Diane J. Dutton 26 Sanctuary Pond Rd. 



MOVED: that the Representatives of the Town in the Massachusetts 
General Court be hereby requested to submit special legislation on behalf of 
the Town seeking enactment of a special law providing as follows, it being 
our intent that the General Court may vary the text hereof with the approval 
of the Cohasset Board of Selectmen to accomplish the intended public policy 
goals hereof: 



98 



AN ACT TO ESTABLISH IN THE TOWN OF COHASSET A THREE YEAR 
MORATORIUM ON NEW PROJECTS UNDER CHAPTER 40B OF THE 
GENERAL LAWS 

Section 1 . Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 40B of the 

General Laws or any other law to the contrary, the operation and application 
of Chapter 40B of the General Laws shall be suspended within the Town of 
Cohasset for a period of three (3) years. 

Section 2. This Act shall take effect upon passage as to any new 

application for a comprehensive permit under Chapter 40B of the General 
Laws filed with the Town of Cohasset on or after the effective date hereof, 
but shall not apply to any application already acted upon or pending before 
the Town at that time, and shall expire three years after the effective date 
hereof. 

Motion is adopted. 



Article 5: 

To see if the Town will vote to adopt and approve the recommendations of 
the Community Preservation Committee for Fiscal Year 2003, and to see if 
the Town will vote to implement such recommendations by appropriating a 
sum or sums of money from the Community Preservation Fund established 
pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General Laws, and by authorizing the Board 
of Selectmen, with the approval of the Community Preservation Committee to 
acquire, by purchase, gift or eminent domain such real property interests in 
the same of the Town, or enforceable by the Town, including real property 
interests in the form of permanent affordable housing restrictions and 
historical preservation restrictions that will meet the requirements of Chapter 
184 of the General Laws, as may be necessary or proper to carry out the 
foregoing. 

Moved that the following recommendation of the Community Preservation 
Committee for Fiscal Year 2003 be adopted and approved as follows: 



Recommendation A: 

Moved that Twenty Thousand ($20,000.00) Dollars be transferred from the 
Community Preservation Fund, to be expended by the Town Manager, for 
the Cohasset Cemetery Department to repair the iron gates at the entrances 
to the Beechwood Cemetery and to fund the construction and placement of a 
historically accurate sign for the Cemetery, and all other costs, both related 
and incidental thereto. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

99 



Article 6: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, gift or eminent domain, a parcel of land located at the end of 
Heather Drive off Forest Avenue, identified on the Assessors' records as 
Map 13, Plot 1, totaling approximately 32.13 acres, more or less, known as 
the "Barnes Property", and more specifically described in a deed recorded in 
the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 3333, Page 445; said land to 
be used for conservation and passive outdoor recreation purposes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, to be 
managed and controlled by the Conservation Commission and, further, to 
raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, and/or borrow, pursuant 
to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the 
Town Manager, for this purpose, and, further, that the Conservation 
Commission shall file all necessary applications for grants, and/or 
reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under the 
provisions of the Self Help Act (Massachusetts General Laws, c. 132A, 
Section 1 1 ), and execute any and all contracts therefore. 

Moved that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire by 
purchase, gift or eminent domain, a parcel of land located at the end of 
Heather Drive off Forest Avenue, identified on the Assessors' records as 
Map 13, Plot 1, totaling approximately 32.13 acres, more or less, known as 
the "Barnes Property", and more specifically described in a deed recorded in 
the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 3333, Page 445; said land to 
be used for conservation and passive outdoor recreation purposes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, to be 
managed and controlled by the Conservation Commission, and further, that 
the sum of One Million One Thousand ($1,001,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager for this purpose, and, 
that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow One Million One Thousand 
($1,001,000.00) Dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of Massachusetts 
General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, and to Issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefore, and, that, further, that the 
Conservation Commission shall file ail necessary applications for grants, 
and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under 
the provisions of the Self Help Act (Massachusetts General Laws, c. 132A, 
Section 1 1 ), and execute any and all contracts therefore. 

A 2/3 vote is required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



100 



Article 7: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey a 
conservation restriction in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 184, Section 31 to the Cohasset Conservation Trust in consideration 
of a sum or sums of money to be used to acquire land located at the end of 
Heather Drive off Forest Avenue, identified on the Assessors' records as 
Map 13, Plot 1, totaling approximately 32.13 acres, more or less, known as 
the "Barnes Property", and more specifically described in a deed recorded in 
the Norfolk Registry of Deeds In Book 3333, page 445, and to request the 
Town's representatives In the General Court to Introduce legislation seeking 
a special act to accomplish the foregoing, if necessary. 

Moved to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey a conservation 
restriction in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 184, 
Section 31 to the Cohasset Conservation Trust in consideration of One 
Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars to be used to acquire land located 
at the end of Heather Drive off Forest Avenue, identified on the Assessors' 
records as Map 13, Plot 1, totaling approximately 32.13 acres, more or less, 
known as the "Barnes Property", and more specifically described in a deed 
recorded in the Norfolk Registry of Deeds In Book 3333, Page 445, and to 
request the Town's representatives In the General Court to introduce 
legislation seeking a special act to accomplish the foregoing, if necessary. 

A 2/3 vote required. Motion adopted unanimously. 



Article 8: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the Town by 
adding a new Section 16 entitled "Senior Multi-Family Residence Overlay 
District", as follows: 

Section 1 6: Senior Multi-Family Residence Overlay District 

The Senior Multi-family Residence Overlay District created herein shall be 
deemed to be an overlay district. The location and boundaries of the Senior 
Multi-family Residence Overlay District are established and shown as the 
Residence B and Residence C Zoning Districts on a map entitled "Town of 
Cohasset, Massachusetts, Zoning District Map, March 2002" prepared by 
Amory Engineers, P.C. The requirements set forth below shall constitute an 
alternative means of development of land of appropriate area within the 
District, provided that a Special Permit in accordance with this Section 16 is 
granted by the Planning Board. If such a Special Permit is not sought, is not 
granted or lapses, all requirements of the underlying district shall apply to the 
land. 

101 



Definitions 

"Senior Multi-family Residence Development" (SMRD) shall mean housing 

containing one (1) and (2) bedroom units and/or studio units for independent 

living for persons who have attained the age of 55 years including associated 

dining facilities, common rooms, activity rooms, offices, accessory structures, 

and recreation facilities, 

"Affordable to persons or families qualifying as low income" shall mean 

affordable to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of 

the Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning less than 50% of the area median household income. 

"Affordable to persons or families qualifying as moderate income" shall mean 

affordable to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of 

the Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning more than 50% but less than 80% of the area median household 

income. 

"Affordable to persons or families as median income" shall mean affordable 

to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of the 

Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning more than 80% but less than 1 20% of the area median household 

income. 

Purpose 

The following are the purposes of this SMRD bylaw: 

To provide alternative housing for a maturing population. 

To promote the development of housing affordable to low, moderate and 

median income elderly persons. 

To provide a type of housing which reduces residents burdens of property 

maintenance and which reduces demands on municipal services. 

To promote flexibility in land use planning in order to improve site layouts, 

protection of natural features and environmental values and utilization of land 

in harmony with neighboring properties. 

To create an incentive for the creation of appropriate housing for 

independent living for persons who have attained the of 55 years and the 

creation of appropriate housing which is affordable to persons or families 

qualifying as low, moderate or median income by allowing the development 

of housing of greater density than would otherwise be permitted in the 

underlying zoning district. 

Procedures 

Each application for a SMRD shall be filed with the planning board with a 
copy filed forthwith with the town clerk, and shall be accompanied by eight 

102 



copies of a preliminary plan of the entire tract under consideration, prepared 
by a professional architect, engineer and landscape architect. 
Said application and plan shall be prepared in accordance with requirements 
for a preliminary subdivision plan in the rules and regulations of the planning 
board, whether or not the development constitutes a subdivision, and shall 
include proposed location, bulk, and height of all proposed buildings. In 
addition, the applicant shall provide the following information: 
An analysis of the site, including wetlands, slopes, soil conditions, areas 
within the 100 year floodplain, trees over eight inches in diameter, and such 
natural features as the planning board may request. 
A summary of the environmental concerns related to the proposed plan. 
Sufficient Information, including soil evaluation and percolation test data, in 
accordance with the rules and regulations of the Cohasset Board of Health 
and applicable Department of Environmental Protection regulations, to make 
a determination that adequate provision Is made for the disposal of septic 
waste or written confirmation from the Town of Cohasset Sewer Commission 
detailing an agreement to accept the proposed wastewater flow. 
A description of the neighborhood in which the tract lies, including utilities 
and other public facilities, and the impact of the proposed plan upon them. 
Design characteristics shall be stated in the application and shall include, but 
not be limited to, building material, architectural design, streets, site and 
building landscaping. 

Before acting upon the application, the board shall submit it with the plan to 
the following boards and departments, which may review it jointly or 
separately: the board of health, sewer commission, water commission, 
conservation commission, design review board, police department, fire 
department and other boards and departments the planning board may deem 
appropriate. Any such board of agency to which petitions are referred for 
review shall submit such recommendations as it deems appropriate to the 
planning board. Failure to make recommendations within twenty days of 
receipt shall be deemed lack of opposition. 

After opportunity for the review by other boards has been provided pursuant 
to Section 16.3.3, the applicant shall submit to the Planning Board in 
accordance with the requirements for a definitive subdivision plan in the rules 
and regulations of the Planning Board, eight definitive plans and the other 
plans and materials stated above in Section 16.3.2 within ten days of the 
expiration of the twenty day review period provided pursuant to Section 
16.3.3 

The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing under this section, in 
conformity with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 40A, Sections 9 
and 11. 

A special permit issued under this Section 16 shall not be a substitute for 
compliance with the Subdivision Control Law, Massachusetts General Laws 
Ch. 41, Section 81K-81GG or the Planning Board's rules and regulations 
where such compliance is required pursuant to applicable law. The granting 
of a special permit pursuant to this Section 16 shall not constitute a waiver of 
any requirement of the Subdivision Control Law or the Planning Board's rules 
and regulations. However, in order to facilitate processing, the Planning 

103 



Board may accept a combined plan and application which shall satisfy the 
requirements of this Section 16, the Subdivision Control Law and the 
Planning Board's rules and regulations, where applicable. 

Uses 

The following uses are permitted in a SMRD by grant of the special permit 
described in this Section 16: any combination of single family, two-family and 
multi-family residential structures. Such structures may include associated 
dining facilities, common rooms, activity rooms, offices, accessory structures 
and recreation facilities that provide, for the benefit of their residents, 
services including, without limitation, meals served in a common dining room 
or delivered to rooms and apartments; housekeeping or laundry services; 
transportation services; emergency response services; assistance with 
eating, bathing, dressing, toileting and walking; security; exercise programs; 
medication reminders; and social and recreational activities. 

Minimum Dimensional Requirements 

The total area of the tract, or set of contiguous parcels held in common 

ownership, to be developed shall not be less than ten acres in a Residence B 

or Residence C district. 

The total number of dwelling units shall be limited to 10 units per acre. For 

purposes of total dwelling unit calculation, total area shall be exclusive of all 

wetland resource areas and floodplains. 

Every building shall be limited to thirty-five (35) feet in height. 

Design standards 

The housing shall provide for an effective and unified treatment of the 

development possibilities on the project site making appropriate provision for 

the preservation of natural features and amenities of the site and the 

surrounding areas. 

The housing shall be planned and developed to harmonize with any existing 

or proposed development in the area surrounding the project site. 

All buildings in the layout and design shall be an integral part of the 

development and have convenient access to and from adjacent uses and 

roadways. 

Walking and bicycle paths shall be provided within the site and as a means 

of connection to adjacent conservation lands and neighboring streets and 

sidewalks, when possible. 

Individual buildings shall be related but not identical to each other in design, 

mass, material, placement, and connection to provide a visually and 

physically integrated development. Rigidity in design shall be avoided by 

variation in building locations, landscaping structural coverage, building 

materials, floor area and cost. 



104 



Treatment of the sides and rears of all buildings within the development shall 

be comparable in amenities and appearance to the treatment given the street 

frontage of these same buildings. 

All buildings shall be arranged so as to preserve visual and audible privacy 

between adjacent buildings. 

No dwelling unit in any building shall be designed, constructed or altered to 

have more than two bedrooms. For the purposes of this provision, each 

room in excess of four rooms, exclusive of bathrooms, closets, or other small 

service rooms of less than forty-eight square feet, shall be considered a 

bedroom. 

Landscape Design Standards 

A maximum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the total area of the tract, or set 

of contiguous parcels held in common ownership, to be developed as a 

SMRD may be covered with impervious surface. 

Whenever appropriate, existing trees and vegetation shall be preserved and 

integrated into the landscape design plan. 

Whenever possible, the existing ten-ain shall be presented and earth moving 

shall be kept to a minimum. 

Suitable indigenous shrubs and other plant material may be used for 

screening. 

A 50 foot wide perimeter buffer between a SMRD and abutting properties is 

required around the entire SMRD perimeter. Access roads and pedestrian 

paths may cross the buffer at the discretion of the Planning Board. The 

perimeter buffer may be utilized as natural courses for disposal of storm 

drainage on the site. The Planning Board may reduce the width of the buffer 

to no less than 30 feet at appropriate locations, taking into account the 

character of open space use of abutting properties or the existence or 

requirement of buffer thereon. The perimeter buffer shall remain in a natural 

state to preserve the visual character of the parcel being developed. 

Parking and Circulation Design Standards 

There shall be an adequate safe and convenient arrangement of pedestrian 

circulation facilities, roadways, driveways and off-street parking. 

Two parking spaces shall be provided for each two bedroom unit and one 

parking space shall be provided for each one bedroom unit. Additional 

required parking, in proximity to any clubhouse or other facility serving 

residents in common, including guest and employee parking, shall be as 

determined by the Planning Board. 

Parking facilities shall be designed with careful regard to the arrangement, 

topography, landscaping, ease of access and shall be developed as an 

integral part of the overall design. 



105 



Affordabilitv and Density Bonus Component 

At least 25% of the dwelling units shall be affordable to persons who meet or 
qualify under this bylaw's definition of low or moderate income housing for a 
period not less than thirty (30) years. 

A density bonus of 2 units per acre shall be granted when at least 25% of the 
dwelling units, in addition to affordable units as per Sectioni 6.9.1 herein, are 
affordable to persons who meet or qualify under this bylaw's definition of 
median income housing for a period not less than thirty (30) years. 
Affordable units in a SMRD must qualify as low or moderate income housing 
units eligible to be included in the calculation of such units by the Department 
of Housing and Community Development ("the D.H.C.D.") when determining 
the percentage of the Town of Cohasset's total housing units which are low 
or moderate income housing units. To assure such qualification, affordable 
units in a SMRD shall meet the requirements of the D.H.C.D. for qualification 
as low or moderate income housing units, including without limitation the 
definition of low or moderate income housing stated In 760 C.M.R. 30.02 and 
the requirements for calculation of the statutory minimum stated in 760 
C.M.R. 31.04 as the same are currently in effect and as the same may be 
amended. 

Further Requirements 

No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this section may 
be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect shall be shown upon the 
plan. 

No certificate of occupancy shall be issued by the Building Inspector until he 
has certified to the Planning Board that the premises have been built in 
accordance with the plan approved hereunder. 

The total number of multi-family dwelling units of any kind erect in Cohasset 
shall not exceed 20% of the dwelling units in Town. Such percentage shall 
be computed without reference to accessory apartments constructed 
pursuant to Section 15 herein and shall be determined by the Town of 
Cohasset Assessor. 

The Planning Board shall approve the form or forms of ownership and 
management controls and/or restrictions which limit the occupancy of units in 
a SMRD to residents who have attained the age of fifty-five years and, where 
appropriate, to persons or families qualifying as low, moderate or median 
income, which controls and/or restrictions may be altered from time to time 
during the useful life of the development so long as the age-restricted and/or 
income limitation is not altered and so long as no temporary or permanent 
overnight occupancy for a period in excess of fourteen days by any person 
who has not attained the age of 55 years, related or not, is permitted. The 
spouse of a qualified resident who has attained the age of 55 years may be 
exempted from the age-restriction limitation hereby imposed. 
The Planning Board shall adopt, and from time to time amend, rules and 
regulations consistent with provisions of this Zoning Bylaw, Chapter 40A of 
the General Laws, and. other applicable provisions of the General Laws, and 

106 



shall file a copy of said rules and regulations with Town Clerk. Such rules 
and regulations shall, subject to provisions of Section 16 of this Bylaw, 
prescribe as minimum the size, form, contents, style and number of plans 
and specifications, the town Boards or Departments from which the Planning 
Board shall request written reports and the procedure for submission and 
approval of a Special Permit under the provisions of this section. The 
Planning Board shall also specify the fees to be paid in connection with 
application for a Special permit for a SMRD, bonding requirements to satisfy 
conditions of approval, and owner/occupancy reporting requirements to 
satisfy conditions of approval, and owner/occupancy reporting requirements 
to satisfy compliance with the age and affordability restrictions. Other 
specifications as deemed necessary by the Planning Board shall be included 
In the rules and regulations. Failure to adopt such rules and regulations shall 
not affect the validity of this Section 16. 

A SMRD shall constitute housing intended for persons of age fifty-five or over 
within the meaning of Massachusetts General Laws, ch. 151B, Section 4 
use, Section 3601 et seq. and in accordance therewith one hundred percent 
(100%) of the dwelling units in a SMRD shall be owned and occupied by at 
least one person fifty-five years of age or older per dwelling unit and such 
development shall be operated and maintained in all other respects in 
compliance with the requirements of such statutes and regulations 
promulgate pursuant thereto, and the same are currently in effect and as the 
same may be amended. 



Moved to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the Town by adding a new Section 16 
entitled "Senior Multi-Family Residence Overlay District", as follows: 

Section 16: Senior Multi-Family Residence Overlav District 

The Senior Multi-family Residence Overlay District created herein shall be 
deemed to be an overlay district. The location and boundaries of the Senior 
Multi-family Residence Overlay District are established and shown as the 
Residence B and Residence C Zoning Districts on a map entitled Town of 
Cohasset, Massachusetts, Zoning District Map, March 2002" prepared by 
Amory Engineers, P.C. The requirements set forth below shall constitute an 
alternative means of development of land of appropriate area within the 
District, provided that a Special Permit in accordance with this Section 1 6 is 
granted by the Planning Board. If such a Special Permit is not sought, is not 
granted or lapses, all requirements of the underlying district shall apply to the 
land. 

16.1 Definitions 

16.1.1 "Senior Multi-family Residence Development" (SMRD) shall mean 
housing containing one (1) and (2) bedroom units and/or studio units for 
independent living for persons who have attained the age of 55 years 



107 



including associated dining facilities, common rooms, activity rooms, offices, 

accessory structures, and recreation facilities. 

Affordable to persons or families qualifying as low income" shall mean 

affordable to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of 

the Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning less than 50% of the area median household Income. 

"Affordable to persons or families qualifying as moderate income" shall mean 

affordable to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of 

the Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning more than 50% but less than 80% of the area median household 

income. 

"Affordable to persons or families as median Income" shall mean affordable 

to persons in the Cohasset area under the applicable guidelines of the 

Commonwealth's Department of Housing and Community Development 

earning more than 80% but less than 120% of the area median household 

income. 

Purpose 

The following are the purposes of this SMRD bylaw: 

To provide alternative housing for a maturing population. 

To promote the development of housing affordable to low, moderate and 

median income elderly persons. 

To provide a type of housing which reduces residents burdens of property 

maintenance and which reduces demands on municipal services. 

To promote flexibility in land use planning in order to improve site layouts, 

protection of natural features and environmental values and utilization of land 

in harmony with neighboring properties. 

To create an incentive for the creation of appropriate housing for 

Independent living for persons who have attained the of 55 years and the 

creation of appropriate housing which is affordable to persons or families 

qualifying as low, moderate or median income by allowing the development 

of housing of greater density than would otherwise be permitted in the 

underlying zoning district. 

Procedures 

Each application for a SMRD shall be filed with the planning board with a 
copy filed forthwith with the town clerk, and shall be accompanied by eight 
copies of a preliminary plan of the entire tract under consideration, prepared 
by a professional architect, engineer and landscape architect. 
Said application and plan shall be prepared in accordance with requirements 
for a preliminary subdivision plan in the rules and regulations of the planning 
board, whether or not the development constitutes a subdivision, and shall 
include proposed location, bulk, and height of all proposed buildings. In 
addition, the applicant shall provide the following information: 



108 



An analysis of the site, Including wetlands, slopes, soil conditions, areas 
within the 100 year floodplain, trees over eight inches In diameter, and such 
natural features as the planning board may request. 
A summary of the environmental concerns related to the proposed plan. 
Sufficient information, including soil evaluation and percolation test data, In 
accordance with the rules and regulations of the Cohasset Board of Health 
and applicable Department of Environmental Protection regulations, to make 
a determination that adequate provision is made for the disposal of septic 
waste or written confirmation from the Town of Cohasset Sewer Commission 
detailing an agreement to accept the proposed wastewater flow. 
A description of the neighborhood in which the tract lies, including utilities 
and other public facilities, and the impact of the proposed plan upon them. 
Design characteristics shall be stated In the application and shall include, but 
not be limited to, building material, architectural design, streets, site and 
building landscaping. 

Before acting upon the application, the board shall submit it with the plan to 
the following boards and departments, which may review it jointly or 
separately: the board of health, sewer commission, water commission, 
conservation commission, design review board, police department, fire 
department and other boards and departments the planning board may deem 
appropriate. Any such board of agency to which petitions are referred for 
review shall submit such recommendations as it deems appropriate to the 
planning board. Failure to make recommendations within twenty days of 
receipt shall be deemed lack of opposition. 

After opportunity for the review by other boards has been provided pursuant 
to Section 16.3.3, the applicant shall submit to the Planning Board in 
accordance with the requirements for a definitive subdivision plan In the rules 
and regulations of the Planning Board, eight definitive plans and the other 
plans and materials stated above in Section 16.3.2 within ten days of the 
expiration of the twenty day review period provided pursuant to Section 
16.3.3 

The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing under this section, in 
conformity with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 40A, Sections 9 
and 11. 

A special permit Issued under this Section 16 shall not be a substitute for 
compliance with the Subdivision Control Law, Massachusetts General Laws 
Ch. 41, Section 81K-81GG or the Planning Board's rules and regulations 
where such compliance Is required pursuant to applicable law. The granting 
of a special permit pursuant to this Section 16 shall not constitute a waiver of 
any requirement of the Subdivision Control Law or the Planning Board's rules 
and regulations. However, In order to facilitate processing, the Planning 
Board may accept a combined plan and application which shall satisfy the 
requirements of this Section 16, the Subdivision Control Law and the 
Planning Board's rules and regulations, where applicable. 



109 



Uses 

The following uses are permitted in a SIVIRD by grant of the special permit 
described in this Section 16: any combination of single family, two-family and 
multi-family residential structures. Such structures may include associated 
dining facilities, common rooms, activity rooms, offices, accessory stnjctures 
and recreation facilities that provide, for the benefit of their residents, 
services including, without limitation, meals served in a common dining room 
or delivered to rooms and apartments; housekeeping or laundry services; 
transportation services; emergency response services; assistance with 
eating, bathing, dressing, toileting and walking; security; exercise programs; 
medication reminders; and social and recreational activities. 

Minimum Dimensional Requirements 

The total area of the tract, or set of contiguous parcels held in common 

ownership, to be developed shall not be less than ten acres in a Residence B 

or Residence C district. 

The total number of dwelling units shall be limited to 10 units per acre. For 

purposes of total dwelling unit calculation, total area shall be exclusive of all 

wetland resource areas and floodplalns. 

Every building shall be limited to thirty-five (35) feet in height. 



Design standards 

The housing shall provide for an effective and unified treatment of the 

development possibilities on the project site making appropriate provision for 

the preservation of natural features and amenities of the site and the 

surrounding areas. 

The housing shall be planned and developed to harmonize with any existing 

or proposed development in the area surrounding the project site. 

All buildings in the layout and design shall be an integral part of the 

development and have convenient access to and from adjacent uses and 

roadways. 

Walking and bicycle paths shall be provided within the site and as a means 

of connection to adjacent conservation lands and neighboring streets and 

sidewalks, when possible. 

Individual buildings shall be related but not identical to each other In design, 

mass, material, placement, and connection to provide a visually and 

physically integrated development. Rigidity in design shall be avoided by 

variation In building locations, landscaping structural coverage, building 

materials, floor area and cost. 

Treatment of the sides and rears of all buildings within the development shall 

be comparable in amenities and appearance to the treatment given the street 

frontage of these same buildings. 

All buildings shall be arranged so as to preserve visual and audible privacy 

between adjacent buildings. 

110 



No dwelling unit in any building shall be designed, constructed or altered to 
have more than two bedrooms. For the purposes of this provision, each 
room in excess of four rooms, exclusive of bathrooms, closets, or other small 
service rooms of less than forty-eight square feet, shall be considered a 
bedroom. 

Landscape Design Standards 

A maximum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the total area of the tract, or set 

of contiguous parcels held in common ownership, to be developed as a 

SMRD may be covered with impervious surface. 

Whenever appropriate, existing trees and vegetation shall be preserved and 

integrated into the landscape design plan. 

Whenever possible, the existing terrain shall be presented and earth moving 

shall be kept to a minimum. 

Suitable indigenous shrubs and other plant material may be used for 

screening. 

A 50 foot wide perimeter buffer between a SMRD and abutting properties is 

required around the entire SMRD perimeter. Access roads and pedestrian 

paths may cross the buffer at the discretion of the Planning Board. The 

perimeter buffer may be utilized as natural courses for disposal of storm 

drainage on the site. The Planning Board may reduce the width of the buffer 

to no less than 30 feet at appropriate locations, taking into account the 

character of open space use of abutting properties or the existence or 

requirement of buffer thereon. The perimeter buffer shall remain in a natural 

state to preserve the visual character of the parcel being developed. 

Parking and Circulation Design Standards 

There shall be an adequate safe and convenient arrangement of pedestrian 

circulation facilities, roadways, driveways and off-street parking. 

Two parking spaces shall be provided for each two bedroom unit and one 

parking space shall be provided for each one bedroom unit. Additional 

required parking, in proximity to any clubhouse or other facility serving 

residents in common, including guest and employee parking, shall be as 

determined by the Planning Board. 

Parking facilities shall be designed with careful regard to the arrangement, 

topography, landscaping, ease of access and shall be developed as an 

integral part of the overall design. 

Affordabilitv and Density Bonus Component 

At least 25% of the dwelling units shall be affordable to persons who meet or 
qualify under this bylaw's definition of low or moderate income housing for a 
period not less than thirty (30) years. 

A density bonus of 2 units per acre shall be granted when at least 25% of the 
dwelling units, in addition to affordable units as per Section16.9.1 herein, are 



111 



affordable to persons who meet or qualify under this bylaw's definition of 
median income housing for a period not less than thirty (30) years. 
Affordable units in a SMRD must qualify as low or moderate income housing 
units eligible to be included in the calculation of such units by the Department 
of Housing and Community Development ("the D.H.C.D.") when determining 
the percentage of the Town of Cohasset's total housing units which are low 
or moderate income housing units. To assure such qualification, affordable 
units in a SMRD shall meet the requirements of the D.H.C.D. for qualification 
as low or moderate income housing units, including without limitation the 
definition of low or moderate income housing stated in 760 C.M.R. 30.02 and 
the requirements for calculation of the statutory minimum stated in 760 
C.M.R. 31.04 as the same are currently in effect and as the same may be 
amended. 

Further Requirements 

No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this section may 
be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect shall be shown upon the 
plan. 

No certificate of occupancy shall be issued by the Building Inspector until he 
has certified to the Planning Board that the premises have been built in 
accordance with the plan approved hereunder. 

The total number of multi-family dwelling units of any kind erect in Cohasset 
shall not exceed 20% of the dwelling units in Town. Such percentage shall 
be computed without reference to accessory apartments constructed 
pursuant to Section 15 herein and shall be determined by the Town of 
Cohasset Assessor. 

The Planning Board shall approve the form or forms of ownership and 
management controls and/or restrictions which limit the occupancy of units in 
a SMRD to residents who have attained the age of fifty-five years and, where 
appropriate, to persons or families qualifying as low, moderate or median 
Income, which controls and/or restrictions may be altered from time to time 
during the useful life of the development so long as the age-restricted and/or 
income limitation is not altered and so long as no temporary or permanent 
overnight occupancy for a period in excess of fourteen days by any person 
who has not attained the age of 55 years, related or not, is permitted. The 
spouse of a qualified resident who has attained the age of 55 years may be 
exempted from the age-restriction limitation hereby Imposed. 
The Planning Board shall adopt, and from time to time amend, rules and 
regulations consistent with provisions of this Zoning Bylaw, Chapter 40A of 
the General Laws, and other applicable provisions of the General Laws, and 
shall file a copy of said rules and regulations with Town Clerk. Such rules 
and regulations shall, subject to provisions of Section 16 of this Bylaw, 
prescribe as minimum the size, form, contents, style and number of plans 
and specifications, the town Boards or Departments from which the Planning 
Board shall request written reports and the procedure for submission and 
approval of a Special Permit under the provisions of this section. The 
Planning Board shall also specify the fees to be paid in connection with 

112 



application for a special permit for a SMRD, bonding requirements to satisfy 
conditions of approval, and owner/occupancy reporting requirements to 
satisfy conditions of approval, and owner/occupancy reporting requirements 
to satisfy compliance with the age and affordabillty restrictions. Other 
specifications as deemed necessary by the Planning Board shall be included 
in the rules and regulations. Failure to adopt such rules and regulations shall 
not affect the validity of this Section 16. 

A SMRD shall constitute housing intended for persons of age fifty-five or over 
within the meaning of Massachusetts General Laws, ch. 151B, Section 4 
use, Section 3601 et seq. and In accordance therewith one hundred percent 
(100%) of the dwelling units in a SMRD shall be owned and occupied by at 
least one person fifty-five years of age or older per dwelling unit and such 
development shall be operated and maintained in all other respects in 
compliance with the requirements of such statutes and regulations 
promulgate pursuant thereto, and the same are currently in effect and as the 
same may be amended. 

A 2/3 vote required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 9: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of retaining 
architects, engineers or other professional services to develop construction 
drawings and bid documents to renovate, reconstruct, and make 
extraordinary changes to the Police/Fire Station located on Elm Street, and 
to return to the 2003 Annual Town Meeting, or other subsequent Town 
Meeting, for the actual construction funds. 

Moved that Sixty Thousand ($60,000.00) Dollars be hereby appropriated, to 
be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of retaining architects, 
engineers or other professional services to develop construction drawings 
and bid documents to renovate, reconstruct, and make extraordinary repairs 
to the Police/Fire Station located on Elm Street, and to return to the 2003 
Annual Town Meeting, or other subsequent Town Meeting, for the actual 
construction funds, and, that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow Sixty 
Thousand ($60,000.00) Dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, 
and to Issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

A 2/3 vote is required. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 



113 



Article 10: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer from 
available funds, a sum or sums of money to add to the Stabilization Fund in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Laws c. 40 Section SB, as 
amended. 

Moved that One Million Six Hundred Thousand ($1,600,000.00) Dollars be 
transferred from the proceeds of the sale of the Rail Road Right-of-Way to 
the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, and, that the further sum of 
Three Hundred Fifty Thousand ($350,000.00) Dollars be transferred from 
Surplus Revenue, for a total sum of One Million Nine Hundred Fifty 
Thousand ($1,950,000.00), be added to the Stabilization Fund in accordance 
with Massachusetts General Laws c. 40, Section 5B, as amended. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 11: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to supplement the amount 
originally voted under Article 20 of the November 5, 2001 Special Town 
Meeting, for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk on Forest Avenue, and 
all related costs, both incidental and related thereto, including drainage. 

Moved that Two Hundred Fifty Thousand ($250,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, to supplement the 
amount originally voted under Article 20 of the November 5, 2002 Special 
Town Meeting, for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk on Forest Avenue, 
and all related costs, both incidental and related thereto, Including drainage, 
and, that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow Two Hundred Fifty 
Thousand ($250,000.00) Dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issued bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

A 2/3 vote required. Motion failed by required 2/3's. 

Article 12: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to add to the Private Way 
Repair Capital Account, as originally voted In Article 15 of the October 26, 
1 998, Special Town Meeting, to make temporary repairs to private ways in 
Town to the extent permitted by c. 41 , s. 6n of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth. 

114 



Moved that Twenty Five Thousand ($25,000.00) Dollars be transferred from 
Surplus Revenue, to be expended by the Town Manager, to add to the 
Private Way Repair Capital Account, as originally voted in Article 15 of the 
October 26, 1998, Special Town Meeting, to make temporary repairs to 
private ways in Town to the extent permitted by c. 40, s. 6N of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth. 

Motion adopted. 
Article 13: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay for additional 
infrastructure and streetscape improvements to the Downtown Village Area 
in conjunction with funds provided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
through its Public Works Economic Development Grant Program, provided, 
however, that no money shall be appropriated or borrowed under this vote 
unless the Town shall have voted at a regular or special election to exempt 
this appropriation or the amounts required to pay for the bonds issued for this 
project from the limitations of proposition two and one half, so called. 

Moved that Eight Hundred Thousand ($800,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, to pay for additional 
infrastructure and streetscape improvements to the Downtown Village Area 
in conjunction with funds provided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
through its Public Works Economic Development Grant Program, and, that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow Eight Hundred Thousand 
($800,000.00) Dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore; provided, however, that 
no money shall be appropriated or borrowed under this vote unless the Town 
shall have voted at a regular or special election to exempt the amounts 
required to pay for the bonds issued for this project from the limitations of 
proposition two and one half, so called. 

A 2/3 vote is required. Hand count taken. Yes 162; No 78^ Motion adopted 
by the required 2/3's. 

Article 14: 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager, in consultation 
with the Board of Sewer Commissioners, to enter into a contract for the 
operation and maintenance of the Town's Wastewater Treatment Plant and 
Wastewater Collection System for an initial term of five years, with up to two 
additional extension terms of three years each, such extension terms to be at 
the sole option of the Town. 

115 



Moved that the Town Manager, in consultation with the Board of Sewer 
Commissioners, be authorized to enter into a contract for the operation and 
maintenance of the Town's Wastewater Treatment Plant and Wastewater 
Collection System for an initial term of five years, with up to two additional 
extension terms of three years each, such extension terms to be at the sole 
option of the Town. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 15: 

To see if the Town will vote to request its representatives in the 
Massachusetts General Court to submit special legislation on behalf of the 
town seeking enactment of a special law providing as follows, it being our 
intent that the General Court may vary the text hereof with the approval of 
the Cohasset Board of Selectmen to accomplish the intended public policy 
goals hereof: 

AN ACT TO PROVIDE EXPANDED SENIOR TAX EXEMPTIONS IN THE 
TOWN OF COHASSET 

Section 1 . Notwithstanding chapter 59, section 5, clause forty first A of 

the general laws, the Town of Cohasset may, by vote of town meeting prior 
to the start of any fiscal year of the town after the effective date of this Act as 
specified in section 3 hereof, adopt for such fiscal year a higher maximum 
qualifying gross receipts amount for purposes of qualifying seniors for the 
exemption contained In said chapter 59, section 5, clause forty first A, 
provided however such maximum gross qualifying receipts amount shall not 
exceed fifty thousand dollars in the first fiscal year to which this Act applies 
as set forth In section three hereof. An amount equal to fifty thousand dollars 
plus the cumulative increase in the consumer price index as Issued by the 
United States Department of Labor, Boston Metropolitan Area, All Urban 
Consumers, calculated using calendar year 2004 as the base year, may be 
adopted by the town in accordance with this section, for the town's fiscal year 
2006 beginning July 1, 2005 and ending June 30, 2006 and similarly in 
subsequent fiscal years. 

Section 2. Notwithstanding chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one A of 

the general laws, the rate of interest to be charged persons with unpaid taxes 
by reason of the use of the provisions of chapter 59, section 5, clause forty 
one A shall be a variable Interest rate set once a year annually, not later than 
August 1 of each year, by majority vote of the Board of Selectmen of the 
Town of Cohasset, provided however, such rate shall not be lower than the 
average prime rate charged by the three leading banks doing business in the 
Boston metropolitan area nor higher than the eight percent (8%) rate set forth 
in chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one A. 



116 



Section 3. Section 1 of this act shall take effect upon passage and shall 

apply first on July 1 of the fiscal year of the Town of Cohasset first occurring 
after the effective date of this Act; section 2 of this Act shall take effect upon 
passage as to Interest calculations from the effective date going forward until 
the taxes are paid in accordance with chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one 
A, but interest accumulated as to any taxpayer applicable to the period of 
time prior to the effective date of this Act shall not be reduced or altered in 
any way by section 2 of this Act. 

Moved to request the Town's representatives in the Massachusetts General 
Court to submit special legislation on behalf of the town seeking enactment 
of a special law providing as follows, it being the Town's intent that the 
General Court may vary the text hereof with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen to accomplish the intended public policy goals hereof: 

AN ACT TO PROVIDE EXPANDED SENIOR TAX EXEMPTIONS IN THE 
TOWN OF COHASSET 

Section 1 . Notwithstanding chapter 59, section 5, clause forty first A of 

the general laws, the Town of Cohasset may, by vote of town meeting prior 
to the start of any fiscal year of the town after the effective date of this Act as 
specified in section 3 hereof, adopt for such fiscal year a higher maximum 
qualifying gross receipts amount for purposes of qualifying seniors for the 
exemption contained in said chapter 59, section 5, clause forty first A, 
provided however such maximum gross qualifying receipts amount shall not 
exceed fifty thousand dollars in the first fiscal year to which this Act applies 
as set forth in section three hereof. An amount equal to fifty thousand dollars 
plus the cumulative increase in the consumer price index as issued by the 
United States Department of Labor, Boston Metropolitan Area, All Urban 
Consumers, calculated using calendar year 2004 as the base year, may be 
adopted by the town in accordance with this section, for the town's fiscal year 
2006 beginning July 1, 2005 and ending June 30, 2006 and similarly in 
subsequent fiscal years. 

Section 2. Notwithstanding chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one A of 

the general laws, the rate of interest to be charged persons with unpaid taxes 
by reason of the use of the provisions of chapter 59, section 5, clause forty 
one A shall be a variable interest rate set once a year annually, not later than 
August 1 of each year, by majority vote of the Board of Selectmen of the 
Town of Cohasset, provided however, such rate shall not be lower than the 
average prime rate charged by the three leading banks doing business in the 
Boston metropolitan area nor higher than the eight percent (8%) rate set forth 
in chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one A. 

Section 3. Section 1 of this act shall take effect upon passage and shall 

apply first on July 1 of the fiscal year of the Town of Cohasset first occurring 
after the effective date of this Act; section 2 of this Act shall take effect upon 
passage as to interest calculations from the effective date going forward until 

117 



the taxes are paid in accordance with chapter 59, section 5, clause forty one 
A, but interest accumulated as to any taxpayer applicable to the period of 
time prior to the effective date of this Act shall not be reduced or altered in 
any way by section 2 of this Act. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 16: 

To see if the Town will vote to further improve the Jacob's Meadow/James 
Brook drainage and flood control mechanisms, and to raise and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable 
statute, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to 
carry out the foregoing, including acceptance of any state or federal grants 
applicable. 

Moved that One Hundred Fifty Thousand ($150,000.00) Dollars be hereby 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager, to further improve the 
Jacob's Meadow/James Brook drainage and flood control mechanisms, 
including acceptance of any state or federal grants applicable, and, that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, Is hereby authorized to borrow One Hundred Fifty Thousand 
($150,000.00) Dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issued bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

A 2/3 vote is required. Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 17: 

To see if the Town will vote to approve a concept for safety improvements to 
the sidewalk, railings and seawall along Cohasset Harbor as proposed by the 
Cohasset Revitalization Corporation, more or less as shown on plans on file 
in the Office of the Town Clerk. 

Moved that the concept for safety improvements to the sidewalk, railings and 
seawall along Cohasset Harbor as proposed by the Cohasset Revitalization 
Corporation as shown on plans on file in the Office of the Town Clerk be 
hereby approved. 

Motion is defeated. 

Article 18: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of 
money, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of retaining 
engineers or other professional services to investigate the condition, propose 

118 



necessary repairs and prepare any necessary engineering drawings to tlie 
seawall around Cohasset Harbor, and all related costs. 

Moved that Fifteen Thousand ($15,000.00) Dollars be transfen^ed from 
Surplus Revenue, to be expended by the Town Manager, for the purpose of 
retaining engineers or other professional services to investigate the 
condition, propose necessary repairs and prepare any necessary 
engineering drawings for reconstruction and extraordinary repairs to the 
seawall around Cohasset Harbor. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

It was moved and seconded that this Special Town Meeting be dissolved at 
11:40 p.m. Motion adopted unanimously. 

A True Record, ATTEST: 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 



119 



VITAL STATISTICS 



BIRTHS FOR THE YEAR 2002 



DATE 
JANUARY 



NAME OF CHILD 



Benjamin Hamilton Smith 
Natalie Mars Devin 
Michael Otto Sanderson 



PARENTS (MOTHER'S MAIDEN NAME) 



Matthew & Anna Smith (Sandell) 
William & Renate Devin (Mars) 
Stuart & Donna Sanderson (Fletcher) 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



Abigaie Elizabeth Oliver 
James Patrick Vinluan 
Gordon Pow^ell Hildek 
Taylor Garey Herndon 
Lauren Nicole Koenig Fein 
Charlotte Elizabeth Rauscher 



Lilly Grace Hoehn 
Samuel Roswell Franklin 
Elizabeth Lara Johnson 
Adeline Bradham Curatola 



William & Kathleen Oliver (Walsh) 
Roberto & Amelia Vinluan (Lopez) 
Brian & Rebecca Hildek (Stevenson) 
Matthew & Helen Herndon (Garey) 
Michael & Margaret Fein (Koenig) 
Hugh & Nancy Rauscher (Williams) 



Colin & Marcela Hoehn (Peralta) 
Andrew & Susan Franklin (Salvadore) 
Robert & Lara Johnson (Sweeney) 
Robert & Julia Curatola (Coulon) 



APRIL 



MAY 



Sarah Escher Rice 
Keegan Michael Antico 
Brooke Amanda Conroy 
Natasha Simonian Arnold 
Lauren Renee Bellefontaine 



Joseph Henry Klier 
Margaret Adelaide Curtey 





14 


Katherine Elizabeth Pyne 




18 


Conor Joseph Kenealy 




26 


Elizabeth Tagert Steele 


JUNE 








14 


Alexander Raphael Grossman 




19 


Sarah Shea Glinski 




21 


Samuel Alexander Farber 




22 


Connor Dominic McGovem 




24 


John C. Ford Centeio 




28 


Chariotte W. Hunnewell 




28 


Scott Daniel Witkos 




29 


Colm Leighton McDonald 


JULY 








1 


Molly Jackson Greer 




20 


Jeffrey Alexander Rosen 




24 


Ava Jeanne Fusco 


AUGUST 








2 


Annabel Courtenay Doherty 




4 


Brannick James Hodgdon 




5 


Matthew James Maccini 




6 


Simon Hutchinson Sandrew 




15 


Reid Hall Hosp 




21 


Ethan Stefan Bartucca 




29 


Sarah May Dimodica 


SEPTEMBER 






6 


Chloe White Rafferty 




7 


Piper Bianchard Finn 




18 


Gunner Anthony Nee 



Daniel & Sophia Rice (Kimball) 
Paul & Michelle Antico (Althoff) 
Douglas & Heather Conroy (Lyons) 
Jonathan & Franchesca Arnold (Martitsch) 
John & Alice Bellefontaine (Marsh) 



Peter & Linda Klier (Nistico) 
Joseph & Lauren Curiey (Bradley) 
Christopher & Rebecca Pyne (Palmer) 
Sean & Debra Kenealy (Janacek) 
Daniel & Stacey Steele (Rodgers) 



Jeffrey & Christina Grossman (Rint) 
Michael & Deborah Glinski (Duffy) 
Adam & Amy Farber (Russell) 
Daniel & Bridget McGovem (Farren) 
Jose & Sharada Centeio (Ford) 
Hollis & Mary Hunnewell (Welling) 
Matthew & Catherine Witkos (Cunningham) 
Edward & Christine McDonald (Crowley) 



Kenneth & Abigail Greer (Adams) 
Michael & Lisa Rosen (Henke) 
William & Serine Fusco (Sheehy) 



Sean & Suzanne Doherty (Ziegler) 
James & Melissa Hodgdon (Walsh) 
David & Elizabeth Maccini (Lazcano) 
David & Amanda Sandrew (Matiak) 
Richard & Joan Hosp (McConmick) 
Michael & Mara Bartucca (Stefan) 
Jeffrey & Christine Dimodica (O'Halloran) 



Robert & Julie Rafferty (Landman) 
Edward & Courtney Finn (Craft) 
Martin & Helena Nee (Bryntesson) 



120 



OCTOBER 



3 Lindsay Rose Ferreira 

8 William John Puzella 

9 James Peter Fox 

10 Emma Tower Campbell 

14 Ian James McCarron 

16 Michael Drevins Powers 

18 Morgan Barbara Jones 

18 Caroline Charlotte Williams 

19 Ainsley Anne O'Brien 

20 Dylan Gregory Moran 

21 Caitlin Sue Durlcin 
28 Anna Carol Grech 

28 James Matthew Grech 

29 Samuel Peter Laugelte 

30 Antonia Nottingham Gomez 
30 Olivia Devlin Peracchi 

30 Regis Alexander Schaffer 



Gregory & Laurie Ferreira (Hurd) 
Mark & Karen Puzella (Fanton) 
John & Sara Fox (Tague) 
William & Karin Campbell (Hoyle) 
Daniel & Christine McCarron (l-agrotteria) 

Thomas & Christine Powers (Drevins) 
Michael & Heather Jones (Ludlow) 
Keith & Christine Williams (Coyne) 
Timothy & Linda O'Brien (Labun) 
Christopher & Jane Moran (Drury) 
Thomas & Suellen Durkin (MacDonald) 
Matthew & Kelly Grech (Tiemey) 
Matthew & Kelly Grech (Tiemey) 
Peter & Julie Laugelle (Williams) 
Gabriel & Sarah Gomez (Hall) 
Christopher & Heather Peracchi (Sheedy) 
Regis & Shannon Schaffer (Surgent) 



NOVEMBER 



1 John Joseph Wipf 

8 Brock Gino Biestek 

17 Bernard Roland Mulcahy 

20 Cameron Richard Wallace 

22 Megan Vanderhoven Bowen 

22 Isabel Anne Dinardo 

27 Alexander Liam Mclnemey 

27 Connor Leif Mclnerney 

29 Grace Elizabeth Albright 

29 Katherine Grace Cunning 



Gregory & Barijara Wipf (Kelly) 
James & Christina Biestek (Cappelletti) 
Craig & Kimberiy Mulcahy (Williams) 
Craig & Heather Wallace (Pool) 
Paul & Debra Bowen (Vanderhoven) 
James & Denee Dinardo (Hammonds) 
Timothy & Zoe-Maja Mclnerney (Engvall) 
Timothy & Zoe-Maja Mclnerney (Engvall) 
Aaron & Elizabeth Albright (Stack) 
Sean & Christine Cunning (Sullivan) 



DECEMBER 



Andrew Frazier Collins 
Cassandra Carole Milton 
Julia Diane Norton 
Mia Claire Verrochi 
Leigh Katherine Spicer 
Drew Edward Coveney 
Piper Curtin Norton 
Kyle Spencer Brieriey 



Scott & Paula Collins (Grosse) 
Robert & Annette Milton (Figueiredo) 
James & Lisa Norton (McKenna) 
Paul & Kelley Verrochi (Bowen) 
Thomas & Kimberiy Spicer (Hillenberg) 
Edward & Melissa Coveney (stamer) 
Michael & Bleen Norton (Curtin) 
Robert & Susan Brieriey (Barrett) 



121 



MARRIAGES — 2002 

January 5, in Cohasset, Barry P. Carragher and Candyce McCarthy of Cohasset, manned by 
Joan M. Cellini, Justice of tiie Peace. 

January 19, in Cohasset, Frank J. Santoro, III and Mary L. Carlson of Cohasset, married by John 
R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

February 16, in Cohasset, James H. Lunt of Greenfield and Laurel J. Tinory of Cohasset, 
married by E. Clifford Cutler, Priest. 

May 11, in Cohasset, Marvin R. Harris and Joanne F. Young of Cohasset, married by Charies A. 
Gaines, Clergy. 

May 11, in Cohasset, Christopher T. Renyi and Katharine H. Eden of San Francisco, CA, 
married by Donald H. Remick, Clergy. 

May 12, in Cohasset, George P.S. Cooney and Lindsay J. Guild of Cohasset, married by Gary 
A. RItts, Clergy. 

May 18, in Cohasset, Steven D. Brady and Jacqueline A. Leavitt of Cohasset, married by E. 
Clifford Cutler, Priest. 

May 18, in Cohasset, Jason D. Whitman and Sherry N. Reseigne of Vero Beach, FL, manied by 
E. Gardner Jones, Justice of the Peace. 

June 15, in Cohasset, James M. Donohue and Kim A. Sczepanik of Cohasset, married by John 
R. Mulvehill, Priest 

June 22, in Cohasset, Shane D. Rice of Boston and Erica M. Ford of Cohasset, married by John 
R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

June 29, in Cohasset, Bruce C. Peck and Joann Owens of Cohasset, married Dr. C. Maxwell 
Olmstead, Clergy. 

July 13, in Cohasset, Anthony J. Vella and Keny L. Gruber of Cohasset, manied by Adelard P. 
Everton, Minister. 

July 27, in Hingham, David M. L. Ricci of Scltuate and Stephani A. Rogers of Hull, married by 
John M. Saxton, Pastor. 

August 3, in Cohasset, Troy Chatterton and Jennifer E. McAuliffe of Cohasset, married by Dr. C. 
Maxwell Olmstead, Clergy. 

August 3, in Cohasset, Christopher M. Kondrat and Lizahne M. Buckley of Cohasset, married by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

August 4, in Cohasset, Christopher K. Stern and Kristin K. MacQuarrie of Brooklyn, NY, married 
by Steven Emmet, Clergyman. 

August 10, in Cohasset, Scott A. Brash and Amy M. Weidenbach of Cohasset, married by 
Maureen B . Kiely , J ustice of the P eace. 

August 11, in Nantucket, Kevin M. Henry and Nicole D. Sheets of Baltimore, MD, married by Tim 
W. Jensen, Clergy. 

August 17, in Braintree, Allen Beaune and Elizabeth M. Bestick of Cohasset, manied by Robert 
W. Roper, Justice of the Peace. 



122 



August 24, in HIngham, Richard A. Whiting and Heather G. Terrio of Cohasset, married by 
Marilyn L. Costello, Justice of the Peace. 

September 1 , in Cohasset, Eugene S. Sweeney of Quincy and Erin C. McAllister of Cohasset, 
married by John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

September 2, in Aquinnah, Clark H. Brewer and Dana L. Hills of Cohasset, manied by Merrily B. 
Fenner, Justice of the Peace. 

September 7, in Cohasset, Eric A. Davis and Emily R. Collins of Wilmington, NC, married by 
Gary A. Ritts . UCC Clergy . 

September 14, in Cohasset, Adam J. Jonath and Elaine J. Urban of Waikoloa, HI married by 
GaryA. Ritts, UCC Clery. 

September 21, in Cohasset, Michael S. Bleakie of Scituate and Mairi L. Fuller of Duxbury, 
mamed by David S. Heald, Episcopal Priest. 

October 5, in Hingham, Donald L. Bookstein of Hingham and Helen E. Garber of Cohasset, 
mamed by Elias J. Lieberman, Rabbi. 

October 5, In Nantucket, Samuel K. Kelley and Maria A. Infantine of Nantucket, married by 
Edmund M. Reggie, Judge. 

October 6, In Cohasset, Timothy J. Libby and Patricia A. Kane of Scituate, married by Gary A. 
Ritts, Clergy. 

October 12, in Cohasset Freeman C. Chase and Lucretia M. Davie of Cohasset, married by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

October 19, in Cohasset, David W. Chapman and Linda E. Rosatone of Cohasset, married by 
GaryA. Ritts, Clergy. 

October 19, In Falmouth, Kevin L. Taylor and Anne E. Eshelman of Cohasset, married by 
Jeanette A. Jones, Justice of the Peace. 

October 19, in Cohasset, Ryan T. Kane and Kimberiy S. Farwell of Cohasset, married by 
Richard Black, Clergy. 

October 19, in Cohasset, James P. Kane of Bolton and Jennifer Lagrotteria of Cohasset, married 
by John A. Oliver, Priest. 

October 27, in Cohasset Coleman R. Mannion and Elizabeth C. Muncey of Quincy, married by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

November 16, 2002, in Cohasset Jody F. Kehoe and Stacey M. Olsen of Cohasset, manied by 
John R. Mulvehill, Priest. 

December 31 , 2002, in Cohasset Matthew R. Beggan & Caltlyn Murray of Brooklyn, NY, manied 
by James Erving, Priest. 



123 



DATE 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 2002 

NAME AGE 



3 


William M. Fletcher 


70 


3 


Lloyd M. Huskins Sr 


80 


5 


Marie C. Ingemi 


77 


16 


Richard S. McLaughlin 


65 


FEBRUARY 






7 


Mary M. Daley 


98 


14 


John T. Wilson Jr 


84 


MARCH 






1 


Elizabeth C. Brister 


89 


2 


Virginia M. Barnes 


74 


9 


Maureen A. O'Connell 


79 


11 


Ruth M. Coblentz 


74 


14 


Josephine Irwin 


80 


15 


Jesse E. Sargent 


16 


28 


Francis Infusino 


85 


30 


Harry S. Jason 


87 


APRIL 






3 


Elinor 1. Kennedy 


99 


8 


John H. Fraser 


64 


21 


Priscilla C. Dresser 


85 


21 


John Redfeam 


90 


27 


Alma C. Welch 


95 


MAY 






11 


Romayne E. Diab 


73 


13 


Kevin L. Bailey 


49 


15 


Barbara G. Eaton 


95 


22 


Enna L, Reid 


93 


23 


Michael F. Donovan 


52 


26 


Robert M.Thompson 


74 


JUNE 






1 


John Nicolson 


59 


1 


Nicholas Spencer 


74 


4 


Jeanne M. Sullivan 


75 


9 


Paul N. Thoresen 


76 


14 


Winifred K. Kuhn 


62 


14 


Andrew L. Foster 


76 


15 


Lucy T. West 


82 


17 


James A. Mullen 


82 


29 


Samuel K. Greenberg 


77 


29 


Ruth L. Tyler 


95 


JULY 






1 


Jane B. Cook 


90 


3 


William F. Kllroy 


69 


3 


Arthur Somerville 


96 


3 


James H. Watson, Sr. 


99 


13 


Joseph D. Ledoux 


80 


19 


Rosemary A. Raccio 


79 


20 


William Nast 


100 


30 


Eleanor E. Humphreys 


88 



124 



AUGUST 






1 


Anna Hussar 


90 


2 


Harry A.Trask 


74 


5 


Miriam Poole 


93 


6 


John P. McCarthy 


73 


10 


Jane A. Greene 


82 


13 


Paul J. Trendowicz 


18 


23 


Herbert B. Marsh 


85 


26 


Mary A. Campbell 


89 


29 


Mildred Salyards 


79 


SEPTEMBER 






1 


Morris S. Levine 


85 


10 


Arnold A. Brandt 


85 


13 


Dorothy M. Flynn 


80 


19 


Joan M. Lan-abee 


64 


25 


Mary G. Reardon 


90 


29 


Hazel L. Smith 


80 


30 


Elizabeth A. Jacobs 


93 


OCTOBER 






2 


Charies F. Pape 


86 


6 


James E. Davies 


82 


7 


Lyie E. Branagan 


77 


10 


Edward M. Guild 


80 


10 


James R. Paterson 


85 


11 


Susan S. DeMichele 


56 


17 


Gladys M. Harkins 


82 


28 


Dominic R. Emanuello 


81 


NOVEMBER 






4 


Josephine E. Vangel 


88 


6 


Forrest C. Miner 


80 


7 


Roberts. Gramarossa, Sr. 


73 


12 


Violet V.Kelley 


99 


19 


Margaret McNamara 


90 


20 


Ruth A. Beauregard 


94 


20 


Lucille M. Purcell 


94 


21 


Herbert L. Winn 


76 


23 


Eleanor R. Quirk 


89 


25 


Anna B. Campbell 


99 


25 


Dorothy J. Lincoln 


89 


25 


Mary D. MIgliaccio 


92 


28 


Caroline Harris 


95 


30 


Elizabeth L. Greene 


88 


DECEMBER 






9 


John J. White 


79 


19 


Ralph Sutheriand 


84 


22 


Peter C.Eddy 


60 


25 


Elizabeth Silvia 


82 


29 


Barbara J. Cunningham 


79 



125 



ELECTION OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 2002 



The following persons were appointed Election Workers for the year 2002 by 
the Board of Selectmen. 



REPUBLICANS 

Ira Stoughton 
Margaret H. Stoughton 
Grace R. Tuckerman 
Terese D'Urso 
Margaret O'Donnell 
Donna O'Donnell 
Katherine M. Lincoln 
Louise Flint 
Avis Sweeney 
Arthur Lehr 
Janet MacLure 
Jeanne Quigley 



DEMOCRATS 



Janice M. Rosano 
Carol Barrett 
Robert Davenport 
Anthony Finegan 
Ronald Goodwin 
Peggy Hassan 
Lisa Hewitt 
Susan Kent 
Patricia Laugelle 
Donna McGee 
Linda Nash 



PROSPECTIVE JUROR LIST 

Pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 234A, Section 15, the 
Prospective Juror List is available in the Town Clerk's office with the names 
of those residents who may be summoned for juror service. 

This information is available for public inspection during normal office hours. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Marlon L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



126 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Submitted herewith is my annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
2002. This report includes the following: 

GENERAL FUND 

1 . Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 

4. Statement of Revenues, Budget vs. Actual 

5. Statement of State and County Assessments 
SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 
Town Special Revenue Funds 

3. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 
School Special Revenue Funds 

SEWER FUNDS - NORTH AND CENTRAL COHASSET 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
WATER FUND 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Retained Eamings 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 

1 . Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
TRUST FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
LONG TERM DEBT GROUP OF ACCOUNTS 

1 . Statement of Long Term Debt 

2. Statement of Debt Authorized and Unissued 
OTHER REPORTS 

1 . Reconciliation of Cash Accounts 

2. Free Cash Calculation 

3. Schedule of Reserve Fund Transfers 

4. Community Preservation Fund 

5. Schedule of Wages and Salaries Paid 

Respectfully Submitted, 
J. Michael Buckley 



127 



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STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES 
AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
GENERAL FUND 
FISCAL YEAR 2002 

Revenue: 

Property Taxes 17,794,559 

State Aid 2,680.998 

Excise Taxes 1,082,985 

Other Local Receipts 2,389, 1 32 



Total Revenue 23,947,674 

Less: 

Expenditures: 

General Government 1,474,036 

Public Safety 3,304,437 

Schools 10,378,287 

Public Works 1,724.546 

Public Health 107,119 

Human Services 151,421 

Culture & Recreation 449.951 

Debt Service 2,892,640 

Employee Benefits & Insurance 2,287,920 

State and County Assessments 680, 110 



Total Expenditures 




23,450.467 


Encumbrances: 






Encumbrances 


646,979 




Reserve For Expenditure (FY03) 


479,544 




Reserve For Expenditure (FY02) 


(230,072) 




Encumbrances-Prior Year 


(626,674) 




Total Encumbrances 




269,777 


Other Financing Sources(Uses) 






Operating Transfers In 


102.968 




Operating Transfers Out 


(699,281) 




Snow Deficit Adjustment (net) 


(71,624) 




Miscellaneous Adjustments 


(7.361) 





Total Financing Sources(Uses) (675,298) 

Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures (447,868) 

UnreservedFundBalance July 1,2001 1,789.129 



Unreserved Fund Balance June 30, 2002 $1 ,341 .261 



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137 



GENERAL FUND REVENUE 
BUDGET VS. ACTUAL 



BUDGET 



ACTUAL UNCOLLECTED COLLECTED 



TAX LEVY 



Real Estate 


17,726,049 


17,534,040 


(192,009) 


98.9% 


Personal Property 


145,543 


143.678 


(1.865) 


98.7% 


Tax Liens 





92,339 


92,339 


- 


Tax Possessions 











. 


Deferred Tax 





24,501 


24,601 


- 


Total Tax Levy 


17,871,592 


17,794,559 


(77,033) 


99.6% 


STATE AID 


1,434,097 


1,434,091 


(6) 




School Chapter 70 


100.0% 


Additional Assistance 


209,013 


209,013 





100.0% 


School Transportation 


66,219 


54,725 


(11,494) 


82.6% 


School Construction 


503,700 


503,700 





100.0% 


Highway Fund 


34,765 


8,691 


(26,074) 


25.0% 


Lottery 


435,175 


429,536 


(5,639) 


98.7% 


Veterans* Exemptions 


10,625 


7.363 


(3,262) 


69.3% 


Elderly Exemptions 


5,522 


12.947 


7,425 


234.5% 


Veterans' Benefits 





487 


487 


- 


Charter School Reimb. 





17,566 


17,566 


- 


Miscellaneous 





2,879 


2.879 


- 


Total State Aid 


2,699,116 


2.680,998 


(18,118) 


99.3% 


LOCAL RECEIPTS 











Motor Vehicle Excise 892,993 1,075.043 182,050 

Boat Excise 7,000 7,942 942 

Betterments - Sewer 509,942 571,039 61,097 

Committed Interest 83,845 83,845 

Betterments - Septic 4,742 4,742 
Penalty & Interest on Taxes 

Property Taxes 31,500 35,774 4,274 

Liens 40.000 59,381 19,381 

Excise 5,000 6,859 1,859 

Betterments 569 569 

R.T.F. Sticl<ers 50,000 107,707 &7,707 

Trash Bags 92,000 129,263 37,263 



120.4% 
113.5% 
112.0% 



113.6% 
148.5% 
137.2% 

215.4% 



Fees 

Board Of Selectmen 
Town Clerk 



3,000 
7,500 



2,631 
7,206 



(369) 
(294) 



87.7% 
96.1% 



138 



GENERAL FUND REVENUE 
BUDGET VS. ACTUAL 





BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


UNCOLLECTED 


-/o 

COLLECTED 


Treasurer/Collector 


22,000 


27.092 


5.092 


123.1% 


Assessors 


1,000 


3.300 


2,300 


330.0% 


ZBA 


2.500 


3,456 


956 




Planning Board 


2,000 


1,250 


(750) 


62.5% 


Conservation Commission 


4,000 


6,507 


2,507 


162.7% 


Police Dept 


11.000 


11,880 


880 


108.0% 


Ambulance 


150,000 


236,494 


86,494 


157.7% 


Fire Department Other 


4,000 


3,962 


(38) 


99.1% 


Weights & Measures 


800 


1,116 


316 


139.5% 


Dog Officer 


100 


30 


(70) 


30.0% 


Recycling 


10,000 


13,441 


3.441 


134.4% 


Pi ibllr^ Works 


100 


1,104 


1,004 




Transfer Station Fees 


2,000 




(2.000) 


0.0% 


Rentals 












School 





12,680 


12.680 


. 


Library Fees 


3,000 


6.069 


3.069 


202.3% 


Cemetery Fees 


10,000 


23,350 


13.350 


233.5% 


Recreation Fees 


45,000 


61.436 


16,436 


136.5% 


in Lieu of Tax 





1.269 


1,269 


. 


Licenses & Permits 










Board Of Health 


30,000 


34.098 


4,098 


113.7% 


Building 


90.000 


133.007 


43.007 


147.8% 


Plumbing 


7,000 


10.628 


3,628 


151.8% 


Gas 


4,000 


4,396 


396 


109.9% 


Electrical 


12.000 


15.315 


3.315 


127.6% 


Dog 


7,000 


7,576 


576 


108.2% 


Alcoholic Beverage 


16.700 


17.070 


370 


102.2% 


Selectmen Other 


3,000 


6.515 


3.515 


217.2% 


Selectmen Road Openings 


300 


100 


(200) 


33.3% 


Unclassified 





1,479 


1,479 


. 


Insurance Refunds 





610 


610 


- 


Fines & Forfeits 










Panning 


21.000 


29,395 


8.395 


140.0% 


Court Fines 


7,000 


6,018 


(983) 


86.0% 


Registry Fines 


22,000 


28,250 


6,250 


128.4% 


Unclaimed Checl<s 





9.264 


9.264 


- 


Investment Income 


250.000 


603.128 


353.128 


241.3% 


Harbor Fees 


50.000 


58.833 


8.833 


117.7% 



Total Local Receipts 2,426,435 3,472,117 1,045,682 143.1% 

General Fund Totals 22,997,143 23.947,673 950,530 104.1% 



139 



STATE AND COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
BUDGET VS. ACTUAL 



Account 

County Tax 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

Registry Non Renewals 

Retired Teachers Health Insurance 

Mosquito Control PnDject 

Air Pollution Control 

Metro Area Planning Council 

Mass Bay Transit Authority 

Charter Schools 

Totals 





Estimated 


Actual 




Charges 


Charges 




$78,404 


$78,404 







2,932 




5,140 


1,468 




328,615 


328,615 




24,711 


24,697 




2.720 


2.720 




1.722 


1,822 




156,754 


156,754 







82.698 




$598,066 


$680,110 



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147 



CENTRAL COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES. AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 

Revenue: 



User Charges 
Sewer Liens 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
State Rate Relief Assistance 


261,975 

895 

1,725 






Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Depreciation Expense 
Encumbrances 
Transfer to General Fund 


326.093 



8.938 




264,595 


Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 




(335,031) 


Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 
Undesignated Fund Balance July 1 . 2001 
Add: Transfer From General Fund 




(70,436) 
15,966 
54,470 



Undesignated Fund Balance June 30, 2002 



148 



NORTH COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 

Revenue: 



User Charges 
Sewer Liens 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
State Rate Relief Assistance 


128,425 



344 






Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Depreciation Expense 
Encumbrances 
Transfer to General Fund 


101,642 

34,476 

525 

18,051 


128.769 


Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 




(154.694) 


Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Undesignated Fund Balance July 1 , 2001 

Add: Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 




(25.925) 

38.582 






Undesignated Fund Balance June 30, 2002 1 2,657 



149 



WATER SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 



Revenue:' 



User Charges 
Water Liens 
Water Fees 
Penalties & Interest 
State Reimbursements 
Hydrants Charges 

Total Revenue 
Expenditures 
Encumbrances 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 
Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 
Retained Eamlngs July 1 , 2001 
Add: Prior year Encumbrances Closed 



Retained Eamings June 30, 2002 15,716 

*Cash Basis 



1,609,594 

45,743 

13,944 

11,995 






117,375 






1,798,651 


1,833,665 

111,345 








(1,945,010) 




(146,359) 









162,075 



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152 



TRUST FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
FISCAL YEAR 2002 



Balance Donations & lnv««tmsn( Wlthdrawala Capttal 
Julyl Rscalpts Income Oam/Lou 



PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 


















Billings Park Fund 


001 


1.428.72 




B5.12 




65.06 


8.41 


1.570J1 


Billings Common Fund 


002 


1,259.48 




75.04 




57.37 


7.41 


1.384.46 


H.W. Wadleigh Pari* Fund 


003 


7.046.13 




419.79 


384J22 


305 J21 


41.47 


7.346*4 


Wheelwright Park Fund 


004 


18.5B9.12 




1.108.05 




847.16 


10947 


20.444 86 


Edith M. Bates Fund 


005 


8.127.76 




484.20 




370.21 


47.84 


8.934 J3 


CEMETERIES 




















006 


163.542.93 




0,743.14 


30.285.27 


6.209.73 


962.46 


148.248.07 


Perpetual Care-Woodslde Ce[net8ry(Van) 


006 


5.914.34 


30,000.00 


283.68 




(4,442.91) 


2.50 


31.752.81 


Perpetual Care-Beechwood Cemetery 


007 


9.835.57 




585.96 


813.83 


414.69 


57 A8 


9.964.51 


Beechwood Cemetery Association 


OOB 


4.592.28 




273.59 




209.17 


27.03 


5,048.01 


Estate of Harry E. Wilbur 


009 


7.873.54 




469.08 




356.62 


46.33 


8.654.91 


Charlotte Uncoln Bell Memorial Fund 


010 


34.703.65 




2.067.48 




1.580.70 


204.23 


36,147 61 


Isadora B. Newey Fund 


Oil 


27.855.36 




1.658.48 




1.268.76 


163.93 


30.619M 


Cedar Street Cemetery 


012 


4.466.79 




286.11 




203.46 


26.30 


4.910.06 


SCHOOLS 


















Ripley Fund 


020 


6.666.32 




397.15 




303.65 


39.22 


7.327.90 


James W. Nichols Scholarship Fund 


022 


2,909.83 




173.38 




132.55 


17.13 


3,196.73 


Major WUKam Arthur Scholarship Fund 


024 


6.585.84 




511.50 


1.000.00 


350.14 


50.53 


8.396.95 


Alice and Walter Shuebruk Scholarship Fund 


023 


121.163.98 




7,188.62 


3.500.00 


5,373.28 


710.11 


129.515.77 


William Ripley Jr.. Athletic Fund 


025 


16.948.68 




1.009.73 




771.89 


99.75 


18.SX65 


John F. Creamer Scholarship Fund 


027 


1,151.06 




68.57 




62.42 


6.77 


1.265.26 


Margaret M. Hardy Scholarship Fund 


021 


233.713.26 




13.804.42 


13.000.00 


10.104.01 


1.363.64 


243.258.05 


Helen & Malcom Stevens Scholarship Fund 


026 


186.834.34 




11.130.74 


9.500.00 


8.121.23 


1.099.54 


195.486.77 


Noel Ripley Scholarship 


042 


26.216.09 


575.00 


1.561.84 


1.500.00 


1,156JK 


15477 


27,854.91 


Bourke Corcoran Scholarship 


028 


19.417.75 


1.195.00 


1.156.82 


3.000.00 


810.56 


114.28 


19.465.87 


Mary Beth Barnes Scholarship 


029 


100.47 


1.394.00 


5.97 


1,500.00 


0.15 


0J9 


0.00 


VOLUNTARY CHECKOFF FUNDS 


















Scholarship Fund 


102 


558.39 


614.67 


33.27 




50.67 


3.29 


1.253.71 


Education Fund 


104 


1,055.66 


496.67 


62.90 




68.41 


6.21 


1.677,43 


Disabled Seniors Fund 


106 


1.535.35 


729.06 


91.46 




99.77 


9.04 


2,*46,«0 


OTHER 


















Stabilization Fund 


031 


438.198.52 


667.281.00 


29.691.06 






25.00 


1.035.145,56 


Consen/atton Fund 


030 


30.277.38 




1.547.28 




480.57 


62.08 


32.243,15 


Beechwood Improvement Association 


032 


7.281.73 




330.14 








7.620,87 


Beechvraod Ball Parit Fund 


040 


321.38 




19.14 




14.64 


1.89 


353.27 




038 


775.136.66 




31,294.04 


60.000.00 


3.968.60 


1.09^19 


749.307,11 


Town Pump Maintenance 


033 


1.999.54 




93.13 








2.092.67 


Reed Comer Trust Fund 


034 


139.07 




6.48 








14555 


Alts Lottery Fund 


043 


14.430.15 


6,600.00 


718.24 


7.738.13 






14.010^ 


Captains' Walk Fund 


044 


11.635.86 


001.00 


541.91 


546.82 






12.532.95 


HagertyTniSt 


046 


57,093.72 




1.448.60 


9.92434 






48.617.96 


PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL UBRARY 


















Vanguard Star Fimd 


037 


762.856.16 




24.698.19 


29.016.00 


(50,810.96) 




707.727,39 


TRUST FUND TOTALS 


3.021.472.94 ' 


609.786.40 


145.114.32 


171.707.61 


(11.504.80) 


6,660.79 


3.566.600.46 






1 . ., — ^. — , 


:=3=SC3S 


BKaasc=3B : 


— --. — - , 


mmmmwKmmm m 







'Cash Basis 



153 



Toviin HKI Prefect (Reftnanemg) 
Trwrtw Station (RelntneinB) 
Fire Pumper 
Schoo<Bo«*rs- Osgood 
Hs^vty PfDp6ily 
FuelTania&f 



PutMe Works Garage Supplanient 
Cemetety Design 



8e«werll.lM\NPATB&-37 

Setnol Plmning 



Ubrwy Planning 
Flood Control 
Harlxyr Moortngs 
F*eTweKs 



School Technology 
Se««rl«l 
HtoQoty Pfop6fty 



C«m0ienr Conttnjction 



Debt 
UnH_ 


Amount 


Data Of 




Macest 


07/01/01 

OulttandinG 


Fy02 

Pitnetpai 


FY02 nr02 06a«J2 

Principal SRF Ouutanding 




1J06O41O0 


WOilBS 


13 yn. 


*X)0 


68.938 




66.936 







sso.ooo 


0«D1ffi9 


13yn. 


4.00 


38,062 




384)62 







zoafloo 


oamm 


10 yn. 


SJO 


60.000 




20Mb 


40.000 




65,000 


03«1/94 


9yis.' 


6.30 


16.000 




tOMO 


5,000 




456«0 


02/1 B96 


16yf». 


4.00-6.05 


321,000 




27JIHI0 


284.000 




299,416 


02n6« 


lOyiv 


4.00-4.95 


136,415 




32M0 


103.815 




99.700 


oz/isne 


15yi. 


4.00-4.95 


66.200 




6.T00 


59.600 




TTiOOO 


02nS96 


15yt« 


4.0O-4J5 


406,000 




65/400 


442.600 




762.000 


021 S«6 


16yr». 


4.00-S.OS 


538.385 




41300 


4K.085 




70,000 


oensm 


20 yn. 


4.65^10 


58,700 




6JBB0 


52.650 





1J16.000 


08/1 B96 


20yi». 


4.65-6.10 






64.490 


1,033.710 




9J90.000 


lonsss 


19yr». 


3.90-5.76 


9,335.000 






8.976.000 




260.000 


10nS98 


19yi». 


3.90-5.76 


235.000 




20MO 


21SM0 





«).000 


10«5«S 


10 yw. 


3.80-5J6 


48.000 




ftOOO 


42.000 


1 


230,000 


lonsrae 


18yt«. 


3.90-5.75 






13M0 


189.000 


1 


28,000 


io/i5«e 


4ym. 


3.90-6.75 


10.000 




6j000 


5.000 


1 


75.000 


10M6«8 


12yit 


.3.90-6.76 


eaooo 




6M0 


54.000 


1 


100.000 


10/1 Ene 


9yi». 


3.90-6.76 


70,000 




toooo 


eo.ocx) 




188.649 


lonern 


20yti. 




180*64 




6J5B 


.430 173,106 




2saooo 


12m/99 


4yi». 


3.76*25 


185,000 




66M0 


120«0 




244.600 


12A01/9B 


16y«. 


3.75-&26 


220.000 




lOOOO 


210.000 




leaooo 


12mi/99 


4y«. 


3.76*25 


120.000 




40A00 


80.000 




120,C»0 


12«)1/09 


4y™. 


3.75^.26 


oaooo 




30AOO 


60.000 




260.000 


12Rn/99 


16yi». 


3.76-SJ6 


240.000 




20A» 


220,000 




90.000 


12A>1/99 


9y™. 


3.76-5.26 


80,000 




IftOOO 


704)00 




360X100 


12A)t/D0 


8yi». 


4JO*00 


aeoMO 




4UMD 


316,000 




109A» 


12«1A» 


9ym. 


4J30^M 


109.500 




14^00 


954100 




160.000 


12«1«0 


4yn. 


4J04.00 


150,000 




.40000 


1104X10 






Ol/ISfttt 


Wytr 


2.2M.60 




80.000 




60,000 




266.000 


01/1 6«)2 


10 yw. 


226-4.10 




285.000 




26S4IO0 




196.000 


01/1S02 


4yt». 


225-3.40 




196,000 




196.000 




750.000 


01/1602 


Syn. 


225^.10 




760,000 




7604)00 




1004X10 


01/16«2 


6y«. 


225-3.60 




100X100 




1004)00 



TOTALS -TAX LEW FUNDED 



BaBemientandTa^UvyOtiltqalloia- 
SlratePond Sewer 
Snto Pond Sewer 
SWb Pond Sewer MWPAT 98-33 
Sntti Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-34 
Downtown Sewer MWPAT 97-36 
Downtown Sewer MWPAT 96-45 
Downtown Sewgr MWPAT 9845 
Downtown Sewer MWPAT 96-105 



1 


3654)00 


08/16W6 


20 yt.. 


4.65*.10 


311J0O 


1 


3264)00 


10/1 ene 


16yr.. 


3J0*75 


265.000 





1.830.900 


i209ne 


20yf». 


4.0*15 


i.nosoo 





1,660,400 


i2nwge 


20yrr 


4.04.15 


1.954.600 





840.600 


12ra»98 


20 yn. 


4.0-5.16 


770300 





187,400 


12mf98 


20 im. 


44»-5.15 


171,900 





261.700 


12W9S8 


20yr». 


4.0-5.16 


240.000 





1.6304X)0 


vxixm 


20,i». 


44W.16 


1.663,969 



30.7S0 

20,000 

32326 49.774 

60,923 11.477 1,462.200 

16.600 19300 734300 

6,660 1340 163300 

4,466 8,744 228300 

634)28 12352 1,498/411 



154 



n«t.l R«Dert ■ Fteeil Y«ir 2002 



I S«werMWPAT 96-106 
Snn Pood Sewer MWPAT 96-33A 
SirMs Pood Sewer MWPAT 96-34A 
Smnt Pond Sewer MWPAT B6-34A 
Downkmn Sewer MWPAT 99-10 
DowdtMvo Sewer MWPAT 99-11 
OownlDwn Sewer MWPAT 00-03 



OowMxwn Sewer 
SB*ts Pood Sewer 



TOTALS - 6ETTBWIENTS & TAX LEVY FUN0H5 






1.626.000 


1Qm/99 


20»T» 


4.0-615 


^M»xaA 





1.866^27 


ii/oino 


20y™. 


4.0^.16 







2.072«1 


iioino 


20y™. 


4.M.15 


2.07Z0ei 





606.247 


unino 


20 yn. 


4.0«.15 


606247 





2.291,772 


11W1/00 


20yf». 


4XX.18 


2291.772 





2.301 .SS3 


uimioo 


20 yn. 


4i«.16 


2J01M3 





237*43 


11/01/00 


20 yn. 


4.0-616 


237i>43 





4379.346 


11/01AOO 


20 yn. 


4X«.16 


4J79J45 


1 


1.1O4.S00 


lam/DO 


20yre. 


4JMJX) 


1.104 JOO 


1 


saajooo 


12/01/00 


20 yn. 


43MSJ0 


538.000 


• 


eooMO 


oinauB 


15 yn. 


225-4.60 







23-524,391 



isjn 


4tj012 


1/««1438 


21JM 


ta-na 


i.Tvuoa 


•i.7ri 


ie.7oo 


i.t7xan 


ejOQo 


J22« 


4MA1 


73J08 


18813 




272*7 


•2^7 


2211.788 


7«7 


1J83 


227 J81 


81.704 


119.120 


4208JM 


n-ars 




^XMJSU 


3052S 






8W.478 

8aoino 


e06J17 


416.731 


n.ioij43 



LaodAcquMiofifRet) 
Water M«ln Prefect I &n 
SyMun Retwm 1996-6 



W0«PB 

TOTALS - WATER REVENUE FUNDED 
GRAND TOTAL 



o 


2.500.000 


oi/oir7e 


34 yn. 


6.00 


803M0 




Tiupgo 




T»«i 





1.900.000 


11/01/90 


15 yn. 


4.00 


799X)00 




lesjBOO 






o 


195.000 


oansse 


eyn. 


4£MI.10 


KMO 




2&a» 




8a«i 





2.450000 


oensiK 


20 yn. 


4.e5«.10 


^.w^JKO 




121*10 




1*37 J80 





900.000 


lonsM 


19yn. 


3J0^.75 


eoaooo 




aooob 




rsoaoe 





1.430.500 


12A)1/99 


15 yn. 


3.76-528 






lOftOOO 









2,410.000 


12rt)1«l 


20 yn. 


4.30-6.00 


2.4ia000 




12&iX» 




2286.000 


o 


150.000 


oinaro 


15yn 


225-4.60 





180.000 







IStUW 






8.i84jet 


IfOMO 


••1J10 


t 


rjtnjm 












46^1376 


M31JO0 


l-33f,4H 


418.181 


*%jrtAjm 



ftMwwTS AVTHWga AND wgweo 



UUleHeftwr Sewer 



Jamet Oroi*. Fkx>d ConWJl 
Water System hnpfovemenls 
Beech Street Property 
Sewer TreMmem Plent 
LttM Hanwr Sewer 
Water System Improvements 
Water Syetero (mprovementt • 
Gravel PK BaO Fields 





03Q7/99 


200.000 






12/01/99 


390.000 


390«0 




03/25/00 


41.600.000 


24.610.000 




03a6m) 


2.9oaooo 


IJSOOOO 




11/06W 


Looaooo 






03niA)1 


200,000 


200.000 




03/31/01 


700,000 


700J00 




ii/D6roi 


1200.000 







ii/osm 


6SO.00O 


660,000 




03««I2 


600.000 






03O0TO 


100.000 


100.000 




03/3OD2 


160.000 


160.000 





03«V02 


i.8iaooo 


180.000 





osrxm 


190.000 


190.000 




mrxm 


200.000 


200.000 



155 



RECONCILIATION OF TOWN CASH ACCOUNTS 
JUNE 30, 2002 



Fund 



Balance 



General Fund 


$5,226,269.67 


School Lunch 


(3,230.31) 


Highway Fund 


1,780.54 


School Special Revenue 


111,607.94 


Tovm Special Revenue 


580,699.85 


Commxinity Preservation 


112,945.44 


Sewer Ftind 


(13,455.00) 


N. Cohasset Sewer Fund 


26,251.42 


Sewer Capital Fund 


573,030.50 


Capital Projects Fund 


1,063,069.88 


Capital Projects - School 


4,287,955.65 


Capital Projects - Library 


577,243.56 


Water Fund 


220,073.57 


Water Capital Projects 


318,419.53 


Trust Funds 


3,586,600.46 


Payroll Withholdings 


50,669.63 


Agency Fvmd 


9,421.97 



ACCOUNTANT TOTAL 



$16,729,354.30 



Cash on Hand 


$150.00 


Abington Savings 


104,041.56 


Ka stern Bank 


1,255,023.13 


Hingham Institute For Savings 


3,061,845.40 


Boston Safe 


2,374,091.45 


Fleet Bank 


275,538.58 


Mass. Mxmicipal Dep. Trust 


2,595,431.98 


Pilgrim Cooperative 


1,011,228.82 


Rockland Trust 


2,462,119.67 


State Street Bank &. Trust 


3,283.25 


Trust Fimds 


3,586,600.46 



TREASURER TOTAL 



$16,729,354.30 



156 



FREE CASH CALCULATION 
JUNE 30, 2002 



Unexpended Balance Fiscal 2001: 
Decrease in Uncollected Property Taxes: 





19.404 


Surplus Local Receipts: 






Motor Vehicle Excise 


182,050 




Penalties & Interest 


26,400 




R.T.F. Stickers 


94.970 




Ambulance 


86,494 




Building Pemiits 


50,346 




Sewer Bettemients 


61,097 




Investment Income 


57,049 




Investment Income-School Construction 


296,079 




Central Sewer Deficit 


-51,394 




Other Local Receipts 


155,608 


958,699 


Returned Appropriations 




136,998 


D.O.R. Adjustments 




-8,628 



June 30, 2002 Free Cash 1,106,473 



157 



SCHEDULE OF RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 
FISCAL YEAR 2002 



Appropriation 






100,000.00 


Public Works 


9/27/2001 


Glass Cnjsher 


5,300.00 


Harbormaster 


2/13/2002 


Salary 


3,398.00 


Public Works 


2/13/2002 


Tree Work 


2,600.00 


Selectmen 


3/12/2002 


Central Sewer 


10,000.00 


Selectmen 


5/21/2002 


Veteran's Park 


15,000.00 


Selectmen 


5/21/2002 


Town Hall Elevator 


1,200.00 


Assessors 


5/21/2002 


Map Maintenance 


1,917.00 


Health 


5/21/2002 


Assistant Nurse 


1,389.00 


Public Works 


5/21/2002 


Overtime 


5.200.00 


Harbormaster 


5/21/2002 


Part Time Help 


6,386.00 


Fire 


7/18/2002 


Collection Agency 


2,389.00 


Plumbing & Gas 


7/18/2002 


inspector 


1,230.00 


Water 


7/18/2002 


Water Purchase 


4,127.00 


Street Lights 


7/18/2002 


Electricity 


3,473.00 


Life Insurance 


7/18/2002 


Town Share 


87.00 


Medicare Tax 


7/18/2002 


Town Share 


12,674.00 


Property Insurarice 


7/18/2002 


Police Coverage 


2,604.00 


Legal 


7/18/2002 


Town Counsel 


21,026.00 






Total = 


100,000.00 



158 



COMMUNITY PRESERVATION FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES, AND 
CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
Revenue: 



User Charges 
Interest & Penalties 
Miscellaneous Revenue 
State Matching Funds 


212,683 



262 






Total Revenue 

Expenditures 

Reserved For Expenditure 

Transfer to Capital Fund (Ball Fields) 




84,810 
100,000 


212.945 


Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 


=: 


(184,810) 


Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Undesignated Fund Balance July 1, 2001 

Add: Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 


28,135 







Undesignated Fund Balance June 30, 2002 


28.135 



159 



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165 



Report of the Town Treasurer 
July 1,2001 -June 30. 2002 

In Fiscal Year 2002, the Town of Cohasset's bond rating was upgraded by 
both Moody's and Standard & Poor's. This was the third time in six years 
that the rating agencies upgraded the Town's bond rating. 

Moody's upgraded the Town of Cohasset's rating from Aa3 to Aa2 and 
Standard & Poor's upgraded the Town from AA to AA+. As a result of the 
upgrades from the rating agencies, the Town sold its bonds and notes in 
Fiscal 2002 at extremely favorable rates saving the residents of Cohasset 
thousands of dollars in interest premiums. 

In Fiscal Year 2002, the Town continued to implement the provisions of both 
MGL Chapter 60, Section 3C and 3D which allows the Town to include a 
check-off insert with tax bills. As of June 30, 2002, the following funds have 
been collected: 

Town Scholarship Fund: $1,255.71 

Local Education Fund: $1,677.43 

Elderly & Disabled Taxation Fund: $ 2,446.60 

The Scholarship Fund will provide secondary school tuition assistance to 
deserving Town residents. These funds will be in addition to scholarships 
currently available to Town residents. 

The Educational Fund will provide supplemental educational funding for 
Cohasset Public Schools. Additionally, funds may be used for existing adult 
literacy programs. 

The Elderly / Disabled Fund will provide property tax relief for elderly and 
disabled Cohasset taxpayers who meet specific criteria established by the 
Elderly / Disabled Fund Committee. 

Awards for the above funds will be made in future years once there are 
sufficient sums available. 

The Treasurer/Collectors office continued its comprehensive Tax Title 
Collection Program. The following amounts were collected through Tax Title 
collection in Fiscal Year 2002: 

Tax Title Liens: $101 ,795.95 

Interest: $ 48.635.20 

Total: $150,431.15 

In Fiscal 2002, the Treasurer / Collector's office continued an investment 
strategy that balances the safety, liquidity and yield of the Town's funds. 
Even though interest rates in the market dropped significantly this year, 

166 



investment income received for Fiscal Year 2002 in the General Fund was 
$603,128, a slight increase of $8,977 over Fiscal Year 2001 . 

The following is a listing of the Town's Fiscal Year 2002 General Fund Cash 
balance: 



BALANCE IN TREASURY JULY 1 , 2001 
Total Receipts for Fiscal Year 2002 
Paid Warrants 
BALANCE IN TREASURY JUNE 30. 2002 



$11,165,746.80 
$65,981,920.96 
$64,004,913.92 
$13,142,753.84 



DEPOSITORIES 
Abington Savings 
Eastern Bank 
Hingham Institution 
Boston Safe Deposit 
Fleet Bank 
MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 
Rockland Trust 
State Street Bank 
Cash in Drawer 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 



$ 104,041.56 

$ 1,255,023.13 

$ 3,061.845.40 

$ 2,374.091.45 

$ 275,538.58 

$ 2,595.431.98 

$ 1,011,228.82 

$ 2,462,119.67 

$ 3.283.25 

$ 150.00 

$ 13.142.753.84 



The following is a listing of the Town's Fiscal Year 2002 Trust Funds 
balance: 



DEPOSITORIES 

Hingham Institution 

MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 

Rockland Trust 

Vanguard 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 

Respectfully Submitted 

Joseph A. DIVito, Jr. 
Treasurer-Collector 



$ 360,905.60 

$ 57,093.72 

$ 493,411.63 

$ 1,341,291.49 

$ 768,770.50 

$ 3.586,600.46 



167 



The following is a listing of the Town's Fiscal Year 2002 General 

BALANCE IN TREASURY JULY 1, 2001 

Total Receipts for Fiscal Year 2002 

Paid Warrants 

BALANCE IN TREASURY JUNE 30. 2002 

DEPOSITORIES 

Abington Savings 
Eastern Bank 
Hingham Institution 
Boston Safe Deposit 
Fleet Bank 
MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 
Rockland Trust 
State Street Bank 
Cash in Drawer 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 



Fund Cash t}alance: 

$11,165,746.80 

$65,981,920.96 

$64,004,913.92 

$13,142,763.84 



$ 104.041.56 

$ 1,255,023.13 

$ 3,061.845.40 

$ 2.374.091.45 

$ 275,538.58 

$ 2.595.431.98 

$ 1.011.228.82 

$ 2,462,119.67 

$ 3,283.25 

$ 150.00 



$ 13.142,753.84 



The following is a listing of ttie Town's Fiscal Year 2002 Trust Funds balance: 
DEPOSITORIES 



Hingham Institution 

MMDT 

Pilgrim Cooperative 

Rockland Trust 

Vanguard 

TOTAL DEPOSITORIES 



360,905.60 

57,093.72 

493,411.63 

1,341,291.49 

768.770.50 



$ 3,586,600.46 



Respectfully Submitted 

Joseph A. DIVito, Jr. 
Treasurer-Collector 



168 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR 
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002 

In Fiscal 2002, the Treasurer/Collector's office processed approximately 
12,244 Real Estate tax bills, 796 Personal Property tax bills. 8,189 Motor 
Vehicle Excise tax bills and 10,371 Water/Sewer bills. 

In Fiscal 2002, the first year of the Community Preservation Act surcharge for 
open space, historical resources and affordable housing purposes, the Town 
collected $215,627.52 (including interest). Furthermore, in October 2002 the 
Town received a matching grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
totaling $21 5,525. 

Once again considerable efforts were made contacting taxpayer and 
collecting taxes in arrears. Tax liens were record on all subsequent Fiscal 
Year 2002 taxes totaling $54,226.41 . Since there were only two outstanding 
Fiscal Year 2001 real estate tax accounts, efforts have been made to collect 
these funds without the necessity of the formal tax lien process. If these 
efforts are unsuccessful, these two accounts will be included with the Fiscal 
Year 2002 tax lien process. 

Finally, in 2002, the Treasurer/Collector's office requested bids for the 
purchase of a new Collector's system. The bid for the new Real Estate, 
Personal Property, Betterment, Motor Vehicle/Boat Excise and Water/Sewer 
system was awarded to Customized Data Services, Inc. of Whitman, 
Massachusetts. 

The new system Real Estate and Personal Property was successfully 
installed by the close of Fiscal Year 2002, in time for the mailing of the Fiscal 
Year 2003 first quarter bills. Many thanks to all of those who assisted in the 
implementation of the new Collector's system, especially departmental staff 
Linda Litchfield, Jane Henderson, Devon Noonan and Finance Director Mike 
Buckley. In Fiscal Year 2003, the remaining new system modules will be 
rolled out. 

Attached is a spreadsheet outlining receivable activity for Fiscal Year 2002. 

Respectfully submitted, • 

Joseph A. DiVito, Jr. 
Treasurer-Collector 



169 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR 

July 1. 2001 • June 30. 2002 



L«\/yar2002 
Uvyor2001 
L*vyaf2000 
l^vy 0(1099 

Tool (All Ym 



PmwoimI Property Ta 

L«vyof2002 

Levy (^ 2001 

Levy of 2000 

ljvyof1999 

Levy or 1996 

Prior Year* 

Total (All Yemm) 



Detarred Prapefty T« 



Motor Vehicle Exdce 
Levy of 2002 
Levy of 2001 
Levy of 2000 
Levy of 1999 
Levy or 1998 
Prior Years 



Total (Alt Years) 
TaxUeneaaxTWe 



Kxa 

$130,285.52 
**.458.03 
-$243.30 


$17,726,049.12 
$0.00 
S0.00 
$0.00 


$105,092.31 

$2,526.40 

$0.00 

KXXi 


$57,383.76 

$48,123.40 

$2,591/46 

$0.00 


$17.440316.17 

$213,157.86 

$1,453.87 

90J0O 


-$75.06034 

$20.14^95 

-$12,133.83 

$355.06 


$162364.08 

-$8,152.38 

•$8.53721 

$111.76 


$143.48125 


$17,726,048.12 


$107,618.71 


$108,098.84 


$17,654,927:90 


-$86,696.16 


$14838624 


%OJ00 
$1,783.00 
$2,097.42 
$2,120.24 
$2,900.48 
$12,933.55 


$145,435.65 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 
SOJOO 
$0.00 


$723.24 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 


$434.86 
$1,023.46 
$5.91 
$0.00 
$OJ)0 
$0.00 


$144,000.85 
$1,038.83 
$17.73 
$10.69 
$0.00 
$0.00 


$0.00 
-$1286.84 
$665.12 
$00.84 
$000 
$0.00 


$1,148.42 
$480.69 
$2,650.72 
$2218.18 
$2,909.48 
$12.83335 


$21,862.69 


$145,435.65 


$723.24 


$1.46423 


$145.08820 


-$832.06 


$22339.05 


S254.345.82 


$79,994.73 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$24,501.41 


-$3,194.89 


$306,64425 


$OSX) 
$52,671.41 
$12,510.02 
$14,078.96 
$10,228.80 
$26,823.30 


$838,206.63 

$145,256.41 

$7,067.40 

$0.00 

$0.00 

$0.00 


$17,36426 

$1026023 

$6,239.76 

»«7.92 

$0.00 

$75.60 


$4,945.10 

$10,848.41 

$6,385.92 

$12.68 

$0.00 

$0.00 


$890,358.74 

$184,639.67 

$14344.53 

$6,546.06 

$410.00 

$342.50 


$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 

$o!oo 


$36,428.73 
$13,867.33 
$4.87935 
$7,49734 
$9,818.60 
$28,405.20 


$116,312.29 


$1,091,530.44 


$33,996.77 


$22,19i11 


$1,007,14132 


$0.00 


$9839835 


$307,999.79 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$101,795.95 


-$25,105.30 


$181,098.54 



User ClMroe* Receivable 



Utility Uans Added to Ta 



Itoorings 
Moorings 



Speciati 

Unapporitoned Assessments 



$102,159.64 
$28,056.12 


$1,671,556.83 
$370,440.90 


$7,265.37 
$8,031.60 


$9294.38 
$97638 


$1.581278.46 
$320,999.89 


■$43201.62 
-$9,990.79 


$151265.40 
$51,451.72 


$8,774.74 


$51264.04 


$aoo 


$030 


$44,125.11 


-$38a74 


$15,524.93 


$0.00 
$36530 


$20380.00 
$0.00 


$10.00 
$0.00 


$215.00 
$0.00 


$20,490.00 
$0.00 


$aoo 

$0.00 


$565.00 
$365.00 


$8,488,046.50 

$28,145.52 

$0.00 


$0.00 
$477,858.14 
$84290.44 


$71,991.80 

$5,087.02 

$0.00 


$2.17038 

$1.56a48 

$0.00 


$85,701.60 
$572,681.54 
$83,645.30 


•$562.14838 

$8521131 

$0.00 


$7,770,374.90 

$15,00739 

$445.14 


$0.00 


$21731735 


$1,788.68 


$83.86 


$212,96923 


$0.00 


$2.63329 



170 



A Message from the Norfolk County Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

Norfolk County continues to provide and expand meaningful services to its 
twenty-eight municipalities. We owe our success to a combination of factors, 
especially the superb support of our legislators, municipal officials, members 
of the Norfolk County Advisory Board and our department heads and 
employees, for performing their jobs in an exemplary manner. 

We continue to effectively monitor our financial resources and spending. Our 
focus continues to be on providing regional services throughout the county. 
Fiscal year 2002 benefits were as follows: 

Provided county engineering services countywide 

Funded grants to local food pantries 

Funded grants to MMA Consulting Group for regional (fire) dispatch 

feasibility study 

within Norfolk County 

Funded Town of Holbrook Summer Youth Program 

Funded grants to D.O.V.E. and R.S.V.P. 

The Norfolk County Agricultural High School in Walpole and Wollaston 
Recreational Facility in North Quincy (home of Presidents Golf Course) 
continue to be outstanding examples of beautiful and well-maintained county 
facilities, providing remarkable services to our citizens. Within our 2002 
Annual Report publication Is provided more detailed information regarding 
these activities. 

As County Commissioners we convey our thanks to everyone who has 
contributed to our county being the remarkable entity that it is. We especially 
thank our citizens for allowing us the privilege of serving them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William P. O'Donnell, Chairman 

John M. Gillis 

Peter H. Collins 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



171 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



The Property Tax Levy is the revenue a community can raise through real 
and personal property taxes. The property tax levy Is the largest source of 
revenue for the Town of Cohasset. It represents approximately 65% of the 
$27,098,414.98 of the town's total budget for fiscal year 2002. The total 
property tax levy for fiscal year 2002 was $ 1 7,871 ,591 .98. 

For fiscal year 2002, the Assessors conducted a triennial revaluation and 
adjusted property values to keep pace with an appreciating real estate 
market. According to the Department of Revenue (DOR) guidelines, property 
values should fall within a range of 10% plus or minus of 100% fair market 
value. Arms length sales were classified and analyzed and market trends 
were identified. The new parameters were applied consistently to all 
properties. 

The annual Town Meeting for fiscal year 2002 again adopted Section 4 of 
Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 to allow the Assessor to grant an additional 
real estate exemption of not more than fifty percent (50%) under clauses 1 7, 
17C1/2, 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 41, 41 B, 41 C. 42. & 43 
of section 5 of Chapter 59 of the Massachusetts General Laws. Adopting this 
section has enabled the Assessors to increase all exemptions by fifty 
percent. 

The Board of Assessors would like to take this opportunity to thank Deputy 
Assessor/Appraiser Cheryl Pooler for her nine years of dedicated service to 
the Town of Cohasset. We wish her luck as she begins her new career in 
East Bridgewater. 

Finally, we also would like to thank our hard-working office staff of Assistant 
Assessor, Debra Krupczak and Administrative Assistant, Devon Vayo for 
their continued professionalism. 

The following is the 2002 Tax Recapitulation as submitted to the Department 
of Revenue 



FY02-Tax Rate $11.48 



Type of 
Property 


Levy % 


Values by Class 


Levy by Class 


Tax 
Rate 


Residential 


93.2357 


1,451,454,876 


16,662.701.98 


11.48 


Commercial 


5.5072 


85,734.175 


984,228.33 


11.48 


Industrial 


0.4427 


6,891,900 


79,119.01 


11.48 


Personal 
Property 


0.8144 


12,677.932 


145,542.66 


11.48 


Totals 


100.000 


1.556,758,883 


17.871,591.98 


11.48 



172 



II Amount To Be Raised 

a. Appropriation of Town Meeting 25,931 ,1 58.00 

Other Amounts To Be Raised 329,055.66 

State & Cherry Sheet Charges 598, 1 66.00 

Allowances for Abatements & Exemptions 240,035.32 

Total Amount To Be Raised 27,098,414.98 

III Estimated Receipts & Other Revenue Sources 

Estimated Receipts - State 2,924,536.00 

Estimated Receipts - Local 4,731 ,934.00 
Revenue Sources Appropriated 

for Particular Purpose 1 ,570,353.00 

d. Total Estimated Receipts & 

Other Sources 9,226,823.00 

IV Summary of Total Amount To Be Raised & Total Receipts 
From All Sources 

Total Amount to be Raised 27,098,41 4.98 

Less Estimated Receipts & 

Other Revenue Sources 9,226,823.00 

Fiscal Year 2002 Property Tax levy 1 7.871 ,591 .98 



Respectfully submitted, 

Elsa J. Miller, Chairman 
Michael C. Patrolla, Clerk 
Mary Granville, Member 



173 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

During the past year, Cohasset continued a pattern of modest growth with a 
total of 15 new homes, along with many more that were substantially 
enlarged or renovated. 

Three major town projects, the renovations of the Middle/High School and 
Deer Hill School and the new Paul Pratt Library will be completed in 2003. 

The proposed Avalon Bay project has been the subject of Zoning Hearings 
through the fall of 2002 and a decision will be issued in the spring of 2003. 
This could radically change the town's growth pattern. 

Building Department's activity for 2002: 



Estimated Cost of Construction 


331 


$19,783,131.00 


Building Fees Collected 




$129,952.00 


New Dwellings 


15 


$4,628,000.00 


Commercial Building 


2 


$3,900,000.00 


Certificates of Inspection 


14 


$570.00 


Zoning By Laws & Zoning Maps 




$2,542.00 


Copies for Public 




$23.00 


Occupancy Permits 


23 


$575.00 


Plumbing Permits Fees Collected 


202 


$10,620.00 


Gas Permits Fees Collected 


148 


$3,838 


Plumbing/Gas Inspector Paid 


147 


$4,010.00 


Weights and Measures 


19 


$1,138.00 


Topographical Maps 




$15.00 



As always, I would like to thank all of the departments, boards and 
commissions for their continued assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert M. Egan 
Building Inspector 
Zoning Officer 

174 



Board of Health Annual Report 
2002 



Board membership remained the same with the re-election of Robin M^ 
Lawrence . On re-organization. Stephen N. Bobo remained, as Chairman. 
Peggy S. Chapman, became the Clerk, and Robin M. Lawrence . Joseph R. 
Godzik remained as Health Agent and Tara N. (Tradd) Mullen as 
A dministrative S ecretary. T he public health nurse continues to be Judy 
Fitzsimmons and she is assisted by Corinne Cahill. 

This year the Board of Health made increasing physical activity and 
promoting better nutrition one of its primary objectives in an effort to wage a 
war against the nation's obesity epidemic. With the cooperation of the 
Council on Elder Affairs, a walking program was promoted. Cooperating with 
the Towns of Scituate and Hingham we are exploring placing a trail within the 
right of way of the Greenbush rail corridor. This proposed trail would run 
from Hingham Center to the Greenbush Station, the end of the line. It would 
provide a walking and biking path thereby encouraging increased physical 
activity. Revitallzation of the "sidewalk committee" would provide planning 
for more accessible and expanded walkways with the Town. Working with 
school officials and the cafeteria contractor the Board has encouraged the 
promotion of "healthy" snacks and drinks in vending machines, and providing 
more healthy choices in the cafeteria lines. 

Another of the Board's initiatives was taking on the writing for the Town's 
Stormwater Management Plan. The Plan once approved will provide the 
town with a permit to discharge storm water into the waters of the 
Commonwealth. The Plan is required to comply with the US Environmental 
Protection Agency's Phase II Rule requiring the discharge of storm water. 
The plan will provide a schedule of actions to be taken over the next five 
years to come Into compliance with the nine objectives of the Rule. It is 
anticipated that the permit will be issued in March or April of 2003. 

The Board through its Chairman, Stephen Bobo, has been participating in 
wastewater issues. He is a member of the group working on the Little 
Harbor/Atlantic Avenue Central Sewer expansion. A revised Facility Plan 
schedule has been developed and will be submitted to the State in 2003. 
Bobo is also on a new wastewater study committee, which will develop a 
"master plan" for wastewater for the entire Town. The first meeting of this 
committee will be in January 2003. 

In April the Board sponsored its first annual Earth Day cleanup. In addition to 
reminding citizens to protect the environment through the use of public 
service announcements and news releases, a group of citizens did some 
actual cleanup of litter and discarded materials. One area worked on was 
the hill tiehind Bancroft Hall on Government Island, which is a popular spot 

175 



for citizens to gather. Other areas around Town were also worked on. The 
Board Is anticipating greater participation this year with a more extensive 
cleanup. 

Water quality testing at Basslngs Beach required the closure of the beach for 
swimming for a period during the summer. While no individual test resulted 
in closure, a prolonged period of testing resulted in exceeding a geometric 
mean, which also results in closure. The source of this microbiological 
pollution Is unknown. There were still homes on Parker Avenue, which were 
not connected to the municipal sewer, so this could have been a source. 
Investigation will continue. 

We are grateful to all who assist us with our programs and clinics throughout 
the year with volunteer efforts and monetary donations. 



Keep Well Clinics 


263 - 208 Senior Ctr / 55 Harborvlew 


Adult Immunization 


900 


Diabetic Screening 


50 


Cholesterol Screening 


51 High School 


Health Fair 


73 Cholesterol / 73 Diabetic 


Hypertension Screening 


930 


Communicable Disease Follow Up 


14 


Home Nursing Visits 


318 


Office Nursing Visits 


990 


Total Nursing Visits 


1308 



The Board received the following revenues during 2002: 



Licenses and Permits: 

Witnessing Percolation Testing: 

Disposal System Construction Permit: 

Other: 

PHN Gift Account 

Medicare Reimbursement 



$16,210.00 
$12,812.40 
$ 6,665.00 
$ 72.00 
$ 3,035.40 
$ 2,553.52 



Respectfully Submitted: 

Stephen N. Bobo, Chairman 
Peggy S. Chapman, RN, C.S., Clerk 
Robin M. Lawrence, D.D.S., M.P.H. 



176 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning 
agency for the 101 cities and towns in the metroDolitan Boston area . Created 
by an act of the Legislature in 1963, it serves as a forum for state and local 
officials, as well as a broad range of other public and private interest groups, 
to address issues of regional Importance. Council membership consists of 
municipal government representatives, gubernatorial appointees, and city 
and state agencies. 

As one of fourteen members of the Metropolitan Planning Organization 
(MPO), MAPC shares oversight responsibility for the region's federally 
funded transportation program. MAPC is also the federally designated 
economic development district for the region, responsible for creating an 
annual economic development plan. 

The Council provides technical assistance and professional resources in land 
use, the environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, 
economic development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative 
policy, and inter-local partnerships that strengthen the efficient and effective 
operation of local governments. MAPC has a state-of-the-art Geographic 
Information Systems (GIS) Laboratory and a highly respected Metro Data 
Center. 

Funding comes from municipal, state, federal, and private grants and 
contracts and a per capita assessment on member communities. 

In a variety of ways, MAPC provides leadership and services that respond to 

regional challenges and demands. These include: 

Staffing and supporting eight sub-regional councils whose members, 

appointed by chief elected officials and planning boards, work together to 

address issues of mutual concern; 

Facilitating the MPO Working Group that is developing criteria to prioritize 

transportation projects funded through the Transportation Improvement 

Program (TIP). MAPC has met with communities in each sub-region to 

develop these criteria. 

Crafting, with allied organizations, recommendations to established a 

statewide Community Roads Program, which would simplify the design 

process for particular types of roads to preserve community character. The 

program allows certain improvements to proceed without lengthy design 

waiver processes or adherence to AASHTO design criteria. 

Publishing Decade of Change, a report that uses new 2000 Census data and 

other sources to highlight growth trends in the region during the 1990s, and a 

companion volume of Community Profiles for each city and town; 

Providing build-out analyses to all 101 municipalities to enable them to 

understand impacts of potential growth and take steps to manage it; 



177 



Reviewing and commenting on key state legislation and regulations that 
affect communities, such as amendments to Title 5, which regulates septic 
systems; 

Joining with other regional agencies to facilitate "Vision 2020," a long-range 
planning process for Southeastern Massachusetts; 

Participating in the establishment and management of the 1-495 Initiative, a 
public-private forum that is examining growth impacts along the 1-495 
corridor; 

Partnering with others in a US Department of Labor funded Welfare-to-Work 
project that focuses on transportation barriers faced by low-income 
communities; 

Establishing Regional Services Gonsortlums that help municipal managers to 
innprove regional communication, information exchange, resource sharing, 
and collaborative action, including the collective purchasing of supplies and 
services; 

Facilitating the establishment of the Metropolitan Mayors' Coalition, 
comprising Boston and nine surrounding cities, to work on common issues, 
including health care costs, emergency preparedness, group purchasing; 
Assisting communities in visioning and designing scopes for Executive Order 
418 Community Development Plans; 

Informing communities about the new Pictometry Imagery Technology and 
acting as regional distributor for such Imagery; and 

Conducting a multi-year regional visioning exercise that includes broad- 
based participation from all sectors of the region (see below). 

The Regional Visioning Project: Developing a Regional Growth Strategy for 
Metro Boston 

In one of the most exciting developments in the last year, MAPC launched a 
new civic process to create an updated Regional Growth Strategy for 
metropolitan Boston. MAPC is working with city and town governments and 
various other stakeholders to create a vision and strategy that puts the region 
on a sustainable path in terms of land use, economic, environmental, and 
social issues. 

The Initiative was launched at a Boston College Citizens Seminar In May 
2002. More than 400 people from a wide range of local and regional groups 
attended, and many have remained involved through the Process Design 
Team. That team, with more than 150 stakeholders from various fields of 
expertise, has been meeting developed a design for the regional vision and 
growth strategy. 

We will continue to look for leaders in our 101 city-and-town region who 
would like to get involved and/or lend their support for this regional effort. 
Please contact MAPC if you would like to become involved in this process. 



178 



MAPC welcomes Marc Draisen as the new MAPC Executive Director 

In October, MAPC was pleased to welcome Marc Draisen as its new 
Executive Director. Marc has a diverse background, including service as a 
State Representative and most recently as Executive Director of the 
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations. He is 
an expert in housing issues, economic development, legislative process, and 
regional collaboration. 



The South Shore Coalition of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
consists of the communities of Weymouth, Hingham, Hull, Cohasset, 
Rockland, Norwell, Scituate, Hanover, Pembroke, Marshfield, and Duxbury. 
Representatives from these communities gather with MAPC on a monthly 
basis to discuss issues of subregional importance. A major focus of the 
South Shore Coalition in 2002 continued to be transportation. The 
transportation topics which were discussed during the year included the 
Regional Transportation Plan, the Unified Planning Work Program, the 
Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the ongoing Route 3 South add- 
a-lane project, and the Route 53 Corridor study being undertaken by CTPS. 
A training session was also provided to the communities regarding the 
process of transportation planning and Improvements (from "concept to 
concrete") that are followed in Massachusetts. 

In addition to transportation, SSC also held informational meetings and 
discussions on Vision 2020 a Partnership for Southeastern Massachusetts, 
Zoning Reform legislation, the current re-use efforts taking place at the 
former South Weymouth Naval Air Station, the MAPC Regional Consortia, 
the 10-year report on change in the MAPC region and Pictometry, new aerial 
photography, available to the communities through MAPC (and paid for by 
MassHighway). 



179 



PLANNING BOARD 

The Cohasset Planning Board, under the authority granted by Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 41, Section 81 A - Section 81 GG, and Chapter 40A, is 
charged with the administration of subdivision control and site plan review of 
development projects. The Board also reviews and recommends changes to the 
town's zoning bylaw and map and is charged with preparing a master or study plan 
and reporting periodically regarding the condition of the town. In addition to these 
duties, the Board completed a number of specific planning tasks in 2002. 

The Board conducted hearings on a number of Zoning Bylaw amendments. These 
amendments spanned a wide number of issues including ledge preservation, senior 
housing, and water resources district revision. The Board sponsored several 
important and successful zoning changes in 2002. A new zoning map and accessory 
apartments bylaw were adopted at ATM 02. At STM 02, an overiay district for 55+ 
nnulti-family housing was also adopted. 

In a joint effort with the Board of Health and Water Commission, the Board secured a 
$60,000 Stonn-Drain Mapping Grant. The electronic storm-drain mapping will add a 
rich level of data to the developing geographic information system in town and aids in 
compliance with the EPA's storm water planning requirements. 

Growth and Development Committee members Peter Pratt and Bill Good continued to 
lead the Master Planning process which yielded a draft housing strategy in the fall of 
2002. 

The Board continued to review and comment on planning activities for the Village, 
Harbor and Common, as well as the proposed 200 unit mixed income housing 
development on Route 3A. 

In addition, the Board conducted the following regular business: 

Held sixteen (18) meetings 

Reviewed eleven (11) Approval Not Required Under the Subdivision Control Law 

plans. 

Reviewed and conditionally approved four (1) site pian for Graham Waste. 

The Board continued to monitor the Rose Hill and Ox Pasture Lane (off Beechwood) 
subdivisions and various site plans for compliance with conditions and applicable 
regulations. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Alfred S. Moore, Jr., Chaimian 

William J. Good, Vice Chalnnan 

PeterJ. Pratt, Cleric 

C. Christopher Ford 

Robert H. Sturdy 

Elizabeth Harrington, Town Planner 



180 



REPORT OF PLYMOUTH COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Commissioners of the Plymouth County Mosquito Control Project are 
pleased to submit the following report of our activities during 2002. 

The Project is a special district created by the State Legislature in 1957, and 
is now composed of all Plymouth County towns, the City of Brockton, and the 
Town of Cohasset in Norfolk County. The Project is a regional response to a 
regional problem, and provides a way of organizing specialized equipment, 
specially trained employees, and mosquito control professionals into a single 
agency with a broad geographical area of responsibility. 

The 2002 season began with a below average water table for the region 
which continued throughout the summer. Efforts were directed at larval 
mosquitoes starting with the spring brood. Ground and aerial larviciding was 
accomplished using B.t.i., an environmentally selective bacterial agent. 
Upon emergence of the spring brood of mosquitoes, ultra-low volume 
adulticlding began. The Project responded to 5,91 1 requests for service. 

We are happy to report that in 2002 there were no human Eastern Equine 
Encephalitis or West Nile cases in Plymouth County. The recurring problem 
of EEE and WNV to the Northeast continues to ensure cooperation between 
this Project and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

West Nile Virus increased during 2002 with 24 human cases with the majority 
detected In Suffolk and Middlesex Counties. No horse cases occurred in 
Plymouth County during 2002, possibly due to owners vaccinating their 
horses with a new WNV Equine vaccine. One llama from Halifax, the first in 
the Country, tested positive for WNV early in the season. In 2002 only 4 
birds tested positive for WNV compared to 257 last year. To ascertain the 
risk to human health and horses, this Project continued placing mosquito 
traps in known infected areas from the year prior. The mosquitoes collected 
were tested at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for WNV, but 
none were infected. In an effort to keep the Public informed, WNV activity 
updates are regularly posted on our web site, www.plymouthmospuito. com 
and Massachusetts Department of Public Health at 
www, state, ma. us/dph/wnv/wnv1 . htm . 

The figures specific to the Town of Cohasset are given below. While 
mosquitoes do not respect town lines the information given below does 
provide a tally of the activities which have had the greatest impact on the 
health and comfort of Cohasset residents. 

Insecticide Application. 1,856 acres were treated using truck mounted 
sprayers for control of adult mosquitoes. More than one application was 
made to the same site if mosquitoes reinvaded the area. The first treatments 
were made in June and the last in September. 



181 



During the summer, 549 catch basins were treated to prevent the emergence 
of Culex pipiens, a known mosquito vector in West Nile Virus transmission. 

Our greatest effort has been targeted at mosquitoes In the larval stage, which 
can be found in woodland pools, swamps, marshes and other standing water 
areas. Inspectors continually gather data on these sites and treat with highly 
specific larvicides when immature mosquitoes are present. 

Water Management. During 2002 crews removed blockages, brush and 
other obstructions from 350 linear feet of ditches and streams to prevent 
overflows or stagnation that can result in mosquito breeding. This work, 
together with machine reclamation, is most often candied out in the fall and 
winter. 

Finally, we have been tracking response time, that is the time between notice 
of a mosquito problem and response by one of our inspectors. The 
complaint response time in the Town of Cohasset was less than two days 
with more than 104 complaints answered. 

Mosquito Survey. A systematic sampling for the mosquitoes in Cohasset 
indicates that Coquillettidia perturbans was the most abundant species. 
Other important species collected include Uranotaenia sapphirina and 
Aedes vexans. 

We encourage citizens or municipal officials to call our office for information 
about mosquitoes, mosquito-borne diseases, control practices, or any other 
matters of concern. 

Raymond D. Zucker 
Superintendent 

Commissioners: 

Carolyn Brennan, Chairman 

Leighton F. Peck, Jr., Secretary 

William J. Mara 

Michael J. Pieroni 



182 



GOVERNMENT ISLAND ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



When you read our annual report of 2002, you become aware that 
Government Island has been Town property for 57 years. Your Board of 
Selectmen in 1946 was a wise group. They brought to the Town Meeting, the 
Idea to buy the 7.4 acres from the U.S. Government, for $29,000.00- Yes 
twenty nine thousand dollars. Figure It out that's about $3,900.00 per acre. 
The vote was almost unanimous to buy it. Not a bad deal. 

The Government Island Advisory Committee (GIAC) oversees this piece of 
property for the Town. We're an interested group of seven volunteers who 
make recommendations for actions to be taken to the Town Manager and the 
Board of Selectmen who will, if necessary, go to Town Meeting for actions by 
the voters-YOU. 

During 2002 the Committee has discussed various subjects pertaining to the 
upkeep and maintenance of this very valuable piece of historic property. Our 
meetings are not on a scheduled basis- this may change to either a monthly 
or bi-monthly schedule. 

The normal general maintenance of the Isaind goies on with good 
cooperation between Carl Sestltio, DPW Superintendent, his crew and the 
GIAC. 

The Town of Cohasset ahs a "Diamond In the Rough" right here. It's yours- 
use it- enjoy it- study it- walk it. Visit the area yourself and with your friends. 
Absorb the history thai is right here. It's beautiful and simple in its natural 
state and only Cohasset has it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury, Chairman 

Constance M. Afshar 

Richard P. Barrow 

Robert M. Davenport 

Noel A. Ripley 

Peter G. Whitman 

John H. Winters, Harbor Master 



183 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

The new Pay-As-You-Throw (PAYT) system has worked so well that we 
were able to reduce the fee from $50.00 to $35.00 this last year. We reduced 
our cost to SEMASS by over $116,00 last year. Thank you all so much for 
making it work. 

We continue looking for new markets for our recyclables and are constantly 
watching over our present vendors for the best price or the lowest cost for 
our recyclables. With that being said, we negotiated a "0" base price for our 
paper. We were paying $1 5.00 a ton to have It hauled away. 

We have set up a subcommittee to work with the town hall and will be 
working with the schools to get better recycling. 

Please keep in mind that "Paint day" is the last Saturday of each month 
starting in April and going through October. The hours are 9:00am to 1 2:00 
noon. We would also like to make everyone aware that on paint day we can 
only take oil base paints. Latex paints are not hazardous and only need to 
be left out to dry (or a material like kitty litter added to help to dry it out). We 
ask please do not leave paint on anv other day. We want to take this 
opportunity to thank you for helping us out on this matter. 

Our hazardous waste day was in the fall last year as it has been in the past 
We will be looking at possible working with the Town of Hull to have our 
hazardous waste days at the same time. We will give out more information 
on this as soon as it is finalized. We urge people to bring all their hazardous 
waste on that day other than paint. We ask that you only bring paint on the 
scheduled paint days. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Cohasset Recycling Committee: 

David BIgley 

Merle S. Brown 

Arthur L. Lehr * 

F. Allan MacDonald 

John McNabb 

Carol M. Martin 

Sara Peacock 

Sharyn Studley 

Larry Varney 

Jean M. White 



184 



SOUTH SHORE RECYCLING COOPERATIVE 

According to the IMA, the mission of the SSRC is: " ...to provide a forum of 
cooperative management of solid waste by members, to assist each member 
Town to Improve the cost-effectiveness of their recycling efforts by providing 
economy of scale while maintaining full control over solid waste 
management; to assist members to Improve programs to divert waste 
materials from the waste stream and to reduce the amount and toxicity of 
wastes; and to provide such assistance on an Individual basis to each 
member Town and cooperatively In joint programs with other Towns." 

The SSRC has grown to 15 Member Towns, and its mission has been 
fulfilled in fiscal year 2002 as follows: 

QUANTIFIABLE BENEFITS 1 

1. By using the regional contract negotiated by the SSRC with Safety Kleen 
for the collection and disposal of household hazardous products, Member 
Towns saved about 20% of what they would have paid on the State contract, 
and avoided the administrative time required to bid it out on their own. At 
FY02's sixteen collections, which were attended by 2922 residents, savings 
amounted to approximately $22,100 for this service. The 

Contract also enabled 1 1 3 residents to attend oilier towns' collections In the 
region that year using the reciprocal arrangement, which is administered by 
the Planner. In addition. The Planner publicized the events with several 
thousand f1y~rs she delivered to the town halls and libraries and ongoing 
press releases in all local papers, on cable TV and the radio. She attended 
and helped name eleven of the collections, rondedout paint stirrers with 
Cost saving instructions on latex paint disposal, provided signs and 
calculated the proper billing for the vendor to ensure that discounts and 
allowances were credited and visitors billed properly. In this capacity, she 
flagged $392 in billing errors. The Planner spent 113 hours preparing, 
conducting and evaluating an RFP for a new contract, 48 hours publicizing 
the events and 110 hours administering the contract and attending the 
collections. 

2. By using the regional contract negotiated by the SSRC with the Bourne 
ISWMF, Member Towns enjoyed a disposal rate of $49.17/ton for 
construction and bulk waste. The gate fee is $70/ton. The $10 surcharge for 
the first fifteen mattresses per load was also waived due to a special SSRC 
arrangement With a generation of 9,417 tons and 2.242 mattresses not 
surcharged. Member Towns saved $218,576 In FY02 with this contract. 

3. The Planner assisted the eight memberloWristhafhave long term 
contracts with SEMASS tomgximize their benefits fl"omthe Material 
Separation Plan (MSP), including the provision by SEMASS of 1,250 digital 
thermometers for exchange, a Universal Waste Shed and reimbursement for 
mercury disposal costs, valued at $15,251. The Planner spent 46 hours 
administering and publicizing these programs, which seek to remove mercury 
from the waste stream. 

185 



4. The Planner arranged for CVS/Pharmacy to sponsor thermometer swaps 
jn fiveioWhs not covered by the 

MSP. CVS provided 900 coupons for digital thermometers worth $5,400, 
which were given to residents that turned in mercury-bearing items. The 
Planner spent 54 hours publicizing and conducting these exchanges. 

5. The Planner facilitated a service agreement with CRT Recycling for the 
collection of electronic equipment, much of which is banned from disposal by 
state regulation. Under this arrangement, our vendor recycles and reuses the 
equipment for a rate about 40% less than the State Contract. Collection 
figures are pot available for FY02, but savings over the State contract are 
estimated to be $50,000. Our contractO/ also saved our towns labor and 
material costs by taking the equipment loose. The cost of disposal for the 
electronic equipment he takes at no charge was also avoided, and estimated 
at over $5,000 for the fiscal year. - 

FY02 COST OF MEMBERSHIP: $60,000 FY02 BENEFIT OF 
MEMBERSHIP: $347,000; 371 hours 

INTANGIBLE BENEFITS 

1 . The SSRC bid out and awarded contracts for brush grinding and trommel 
screening for the processing of compost, which were used by six of our- 
towns. The Planner completed the Supplies and Services Contracting 
certification seminar In the Mass. Certified Public Purchasing Official 
program. 

2. The SSRC provides valuable networking opportunities and information 
sharing at our well-attended monthly Solid Waste Manager meetings, at 
which solid waste collection, disposal and recycling service, pricing and 
proposed laws and regulations are discussed among member towns. The 
meetings often feature speakers on subjects of interest to the local MSW 
community, Including special waste disposal, regulatory compliance, 
legislative and budget Issues, grant assistance and regional recycling 
collections. 

3. The Planner's advice and assistance are frequently sought by and 
provided to the solid waste managers, both 

Ion site and over the phone, on such issues as curbside contracting, disposal 
of special wastes, alternative vendors for different materials, regulations and 
accessing grants. She Investigated solutions to such problems as alternative 
markets for glass, propane tank storage and disposal and continuously 
researches recycling 

Alternatives. At the Board's request, she hosted a tour of Waste 
Management's new Avon recycling facility. 

4. The SSRC published a bimonthly newsletter filled with Information 
ofinlmediate interest to the South Shore solid waste community, including 
local solid waste news, regulatory and legislative proposals, meetings and 



186 



seminars. The newsletter Is circulated to over 200 town officials, legislators, 
regulators and volunteers. 

5. The Planner did public outreach by writing articles for and being the 
subject of interviews with the local press, which promote waste reduction and 
recycling, and the proper disposal of mercury-bearing waste. She also 
Fielded at least 88 calls from Member Towns residents in FY02 to answer 
questions, related mostly to HHP and CRT disposal. 

6. The SSRC advocated for passage of solid waste legislation aimed at 
increasing funding of municipal recycling programs through the Clean 
Environment Fund, extending the Waste to Energy Grant Program, and 
shifting 

Some of the burden of disposal costs onto electronics manufacturers. The 
Planner also orchestrated municipal advocacy for State budget items that 
benefit municipal solid waste programs. Legislators seek our advice on solid 
waste bills. 

7. The SSRC Planner attended policy meetings, forums and conferences 
hosted by the DEP, Solid Waste Association of North America, the Council of 
SEMASS Communities, the Mass. Recycling Coalition, the 

Northeast Recycling Council, and the New England EnviroExpo. She attends 
most Mass. DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee and C&D Subcommittee 
meetings. She shares what she learns with the Managers, and relays the 
Managers' concerns to the professional and State organizations and 
regulators. 

The SSRC exists to serve its member towns by facilitating their solid waste 
disposal and recycling functions. It always welcomes suggestions on how It 
can better serve its Members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Claire Sullivan, Solid Waste Planner 

John McNabb, SSRC Secretary 

Merle S. Brown, Cohasset Representative 



187 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



I hereby submit the Annual Report of the Cohasset Fire Department for the 
year ending December 31 , 2002. 

A statistical analysis of the Department responses for the year is as follows: 



Building/Structure Fires 


73 


Brush/Outdoor Fires 


32 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


112 


Motor Vehicle Fires 


7 


Medical Emergencies 


857 


Investigation 


100 


Inspection 


492 


Assistance 


134 


Miscellaneous 


377 


Total 


2.184 


Medical Responses: 




Total Incidents 


857 


Basic Life Support Transports 


256 


Advanced Life Support Transports 


333 


Mutual Aid Rendered - 


,209 


Mutual Aid Received 


128 


Mutual Aid with other Towns, for fires: 




Rendered 


42 


Received 


39 



The Fire Department is currently operating with the following apparatus: 



Engine 1 - 1994 Pierce - 1,750 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 
Engine 2- 1987 Pierce- 1,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 
Engine 3 - 2001 HME - 1 ,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 
Ladder 1 - 1 978 Seagrave - 1 00 Foot Aerial Ladder Truck 
Squad 1 - 2000 Ford - 4 wheel drive - 500 G.P.M. pump 
Rescue 3 - 2001 Ford - E -450-Ambulance 
Car 20 - 1 995 Ford - 4 Wheel drive - Chiefs Vehicle 
Rescue Craft - 1993 Avon - 14 ft. Inflatable/trailer 



In conclusion, I would like to extend to the Citizens of Cohasset, the Board of 
Selectmen, the Town Manager and the Heads and Members of all Town 

188 



Departments and Committees, my sincere thanks and appreciation for their 
assistance. 

To the Officers and Firefighters of the Department for their dedication and 
performance of duties, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Roger W. Lincoln, Chief 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
ANNUAL REPORT 

UNIFORM CRIME REPORT 2002 STATISTICS 

Offense Reported 

Robbery 1 

Assaults 39 

Breaking and Entering 21 

Larceny 53 

Larceny of Motor Vehicle ' 4 

Vandalism 70 

Criminal Complaints Sought 90 

Motor Vehicle Accidents Investigated 1 57 

Motor Vehicle Citations Issued 1 744 

Parking Tickets Issued 1317 

Residential & Business Alarms answered 577 

Stolen Motor Vehicles Recovered 3 

Official Complaints Received 12,081 

Department Vehicles Mileage 1 78,000 

Special Details ^"^2 

9-1-1 calls Received 1436 

Domestic Violence Cases Investigated 32 

FID Cards Issued 3 

LTC Issued/Renewed 62 



189 



RECORD OF ARRESTS 2002 

Offense 

Fugitive from Justice 

Assault and Battery 

Assault and Battery with a Deadly Weapon 

Assault and Battery on a Child 

Breaking and Entering 

Operating Under the Influence of Alcohol 

Violation Drug Laws 

Warrants 

Larceny 

Larceny of a Motor Vehicle 

Shoplifting 

Disorderly Person 

Minor Possession of Alcohol 

Motor Vehicle Violations 

Forged Inspection Sticker 

Protective Custody 

Malicious Destruction of Property 

Open & Gross Lewdness 



TOTAL ARRESTS 



Male 



Female 






1 


7 


3 


4 


1 


1 





1 





15 


12 


11 


1 


18 


4 





1 





1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


14 


8 


12 


1 


1 





16 


3 


1 





1 





105 


39 




144 



FEES RETURNED TO GENERAL FUND 

Court Fines & Assessments 

Parking Violations 

Paid Detail Surcharge 

License Fees 

Request for Police Reports 

False Alarms/Billing 

TOTAL 



34,572.00 
26,140.00 
11,413.48 

1,664.00 
665.00 

1,025.00 

$75,479.48 



Robert W. Jackson, Chief of Police 



190 



PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUNICATIONS 



2002 proved to be again a very busy year for the Cohasset Emergency 
Dispatch Center. With a record number of calls for police, fire, and 
emergency medical services, your emergency dispatchers were kept more 
than busy. 

During the year we continued the in-house training program for dispatch 
personnel. The staff trained in CPR and Advanced First Aid. The dispatch 
center also has been working closely with the Civilian Dispatch Committee to 
up date and streamline emergency operations. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the citizens of Cohasset along 
with the Civilian Dispatch Committee. I would also like to remind our citizens 
that 9-1-1 should only be used to save a life, stop a crime, or report a fire. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Thomas W. Wigmore 
Communications Supervisor 



191 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



GENERAL: 

The Department of Public Works Is a town service organization responsible 
for providing essential services for the citizens of Cohasset. Services 
provided by this department include construction, maintenance and repair of 
streets, sidewalks and storm drainage systems; maintenance and repair of 
vehicles and equipment; maintenance of parks, cemeteries, athletic fields 
and off-street parking facilities; maintenance of all town buildings and 
schools; the transfer of public refuse and recyclables; snow removal and Ice 
control; maintenance and/or removal of town owned trees. 

In addition to providing routine maintenance throughout the year the following 
projects were completed by or under the direction of the DPW during the last 
year: 

Using private way funds we resurfaced Surrey Drive, Aaron River Road and 
Rust Way. 

Rebuilt 1 catch basins. Installed 2 new catch basins, 1 new manhole and 183 
feet of drainage pipe. 

Replaced or repaired 53 traffic and street signs. 

Installed new benches on the common and at the harbor. 

In an effort to control algae in Little Harbor, we opened and closed the cat 
dam gates each month from April to December. 

Transferred 1,862 tons of solid waste and 595 tons of C&D. Recycled 715 
ton of mixed paper products, 185 ton of scrap metals and cans, 43 ton of 
plastics, 120 ton of glass and 1,110 gallons of waste oil. Over 300 ton of 
leaves and brush were processed. We have seen a substantial increase In 
recycling by our citizens due to the implementation of the pay-per-throw 
program. 

Completed construction of a concrete area at the Recycling Transfer Station 
where we have put three containers for metals and bulky waste. We then 
wired and installed two new compactors for cardboard and plastics. These 
improvements provide a safer way for residents to dispose of these 
materials. 

Removed various dead or diseased trees and planted new trees and shrubs 
throughout the town. 



192 



Cleaned and maintained all town buildings. Provided maintenance at all 
schools. 

Conducted and recorded 46 internment's at the various town owned 
cemeteries. 

Prepared $1.7 million Annual Operating Budget and $110 thousand Capital 
Improvement Program for Fiscal Year 2004. 

On April 1^* after 42 years of public service, Harold W. Litchfield retired as 
D.P.W. Superintendent. His dedication and service to the citizens of 
Cohasset are to be commended and we wish him well in his future 
endeavors. 

The Department of Public Works would like to extend our appreciation to all 
town employees, boards and committees for their continued assistance and 
support during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carl A. Sestito 
D.P.W. Superintendent 



193 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



During 2002, the Water Commission continued to make substantial progress 
in our ongoing program to improve water service, protect the watershed area, 
and to increase fire protection throughout. In this very busy and very 
productive year, these are some of the major achievements of the Water 
Commission: 

Fiscal Management. On August 23, 2002, we adopted a new System 
Development Charge, which is expected to bring in an average $36,800 per 
year ($2,300 charge x 16 new services avg. per year). This new charge will 
reduce the need for rate increases on existing customers by putting some of 
this financial burden on new users as they connect to the water system. 
Fire Hydrants. We developed and provided to the Fire Department a laptop 
computer with GIS software loaded with the location of all fire hydrants, so 
the shift commander on the way to an incident can quickly determine the 
location all fire hydrants near the incident. 

Watershed protection has taken a major step forward, with the completion of 
our comprehensive Surface Water Supply Protection Plan (SWSPP) in 2002 
and the approval of this Plan by the Mass. Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP). 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. In 2002, Water Commissioner Glenn Pratt was 
elected to his first three-year term. Commissioner John McNabb was 
reelected Chairman, Commissioner Robert Kasameyer was reelected Vlce- 
Chairman, and Pratt was elected Clerk. 

THE COHASSET WATER DEPARTMENT provides water for domestic 
consumption and fire protection to about 90% of the Town of Cohasset, and 
which does not include the North Cohasset area serviced by the Aquarion 
Water Company of Massachusetts (formeriy known as the Hingham Mass- 
American Water Company). The water system encompasses about 36 miles 
of water mains, 2,411 service connections, and 346 fire hydrants. During 
2002, a total of 269,906,100 gallons of water were produced and pumped to 
the distribution system. American Water Co. continues as the contractor 
responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Water Department 
under the direction and control of the Board of Water Commissioners. 
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. Our fiscal situation continues to be excellent. 
Through skillful management of existing financial resources, we have been 
able to continue our aggressive system-wide capital improvements program 
without raising the water rates since they were last increased in 1997. Since 
1997, we have expended over $7,816,000 in capital improvements projects - 
which is over 3.7 times the $2,130,000 in spending that the rate increase was 
planned to fund. We have been able to stretch these funds through 
measures such as the careful examination and use of our debt structure and 
prudent expenditure of our occasional surpluses. The Water Department is 
entirely self-supporting from user fees and other fees and charges, including 
the fire hydrant rental fee from the Town, and do not receive any property tax 
revenue from the Town of Cohasset. 



194 



RESERVOIR CAPACITY. Despite the drought conditions In 2002 that led 
many water systems to Impose outside watering bans, no such ban was 
needed in Cohasset. At the height of the drought, the water level in the Aaron 
River Reservoir got no lower than 78%, which is far more than the 50% 
levels of 1997 that also did not require water bans. In November the 
Reservoir returned to 100% of capacity, showing that we have a robust and 
vast supply of water, which is more than sufficient, to serve the current needs 
of the Town of Cohasset and the projected water needs of Cohasset for 
many decades to come. We have not had a water ban In Cohasset since 
1995 - that water ban was needed because of problems with the distribution 
system that have been rectified in our ongoing system improvement 
program. 

POTENTIAL SALE OF WATER. In 2002 we continued discussions with 
Aquarion Water Co. of Mass. (formerly Hingham Mass.-American Water) to 
consider their request for us to sell them 500,000 gallons per day of water. 
The Cohasset Water Department does have sufficient water for us to 
consider this request, but will not propose any such sale to Town Meeting 
until we are assured that we will be properly compensated for the water, that 
the North Cohasset area will be turned over to the Cohasset Water 
Department, that Cohasset residents will always have the ability to use this 
water if needed, and that our water resources will be protected. 
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS. At the March 2002 Annual 
Town Meeting, we received authorization to borrow an additional $2,000,000 
for capital improvements to the distribution system and treatment plant and to 
protect watershed quality. In September, with these funds, we started this 
latest phase of distributbn system improvement, which included replacing a 
total of 1.2 miles of undersized water pipes in Beechwood Street (to improve 
Doane Street and Aaron River Road), Bound Brook Lane, Hammond Ave., 
Hobart Lane, Lothrop Lane, Red Gate Lane, Sheldon Road, Westgate Lane, 
and Windsor Lane. The project also Included a storm water control project on 
Hammond Ave. and Locust Road, at the request of the Board of Selectmen 
and paid for by the Town, and the blasting of a trench for potential future 
sewer lines In Hobart and Lothrop Lanes to avoid the need for more blasting 
there when sewers are Installed. 

In 2002 the Water Department replaced 18 fire hydrants, installed 9 new 
hydrants, fixed 3 leaks, repaired 46 meters, installed 29 new meters, and 
flushed the entire distribution system. We worked with the School 
Department to replace and relocate the trunk line from Pond Street to the 
Bear Hill Tank in conjunction with the High School renovation project. We 
worked with Hingham Lumber to install a 12-inch pipe along Route 3A to 
provide better fire flows to their new location - and which will help provide 
better water service and fire protection in that area of Route 3A. We applied 
unsuccessfully for zero interest loans from the State Drinking Water SRF 
Program to help us fund our ongoing water system rehabilitation projects - 
but we are hopeful that we may be more successful next year. We also have 
been preparing the design plans for replacement of the water mains under 
South Main Street so those pipes can be replaced when the Town conducts 
its downtown revitalization project. 

195 



To support our ongoing distribution system improvements, in 2002, the Water 
Commission tlirough our consultant, Norfolk RAM, completed 
computerization of all of the Water Department's field cards, which are the 
customer service connection construction records that are used by water 
system maintenance staff when locating system components for repair. 
These computerized records (2,605 cards previously kept in card catalog 
files) have been incorporated into the Commission's Geographic Information 
System (GIS) ArcView® application that has been established for the water 
distribution system. This improves the department's security against loss of 
cards. Improves record keeping and search capability, and ties together 
locations and records information. The GIS map and database for the water 
distribution system were also updated with information for water main sizes 
for the various pipe segment locations throughout the system, and for gate 
valves (330) and hydrants (323). The hydrant database for example includes 
useful system maintenance information such as hydrant number, connecting 
main size and type, and make, model and year of hydrant. 
FIRE PROTECTION HAS BEEN IMPROVED, as shown by the 2002 rating 
of the water system by the national Insurance Services Office (ISO). When 
ISO did their last rating in 1980, the Cohasset Water System received 23.47 
points out of the total 40.00. Largely because of our improvements to water 
mains and fire hydrants from 1994-2002, and the new Scituate Hill Water 
Storage Tank, in 2002 the ISO gave the water system a rating of 35.23 
points - which is a 50% increase! In the 2002 ISO rating, we also achieved a 
perfect rating of 2.00 for fire hydrants, which is a strong indication of the 
effectiveness of our ongoing fire hydrant rehabilitation and replacement 
program. 

PLANT IMPROVEMENTS. In October we awarded the Lily Pond Treatment 
Plant Improvement Project contract to RH White Construction for $186,000. 
The project will include replacement of the two finished water high lift pumps 
as well as installation of high efficiency motors, and Variable Frequency 
Drives (VFD's) for those pumps. Control changes will be made to improve 
the automatic operation of the plant and dosing of chemicals with the finished 
water flow out of the plant. The floors, walls, ceilings, and equipment In the 
pump room will also be completely painted under this contract. These are 
major improvements to the plant that will allow us to run the plant 
continuously instead of having to start and stop plant operations, and will 
also allow for more consistent injection of treatment chemicals which should 
improve water quality for all out customers. 

We also replaced exterior doors. Installed a new roof on the garage, repaired 
roof on plant, applied waterproofing agent to building, replaced horizontal 
flocculator and sedimentation basin equipment, built chemical retaining walls 
around polymer and fluoride containers, replaced exterior lighting, installed 
new gate at plant driveway, installed new alarm system on all facilities, 
connected plant to town sewer, rebuilt raw water pumps 1 & 3, improved 
landscaping in front of plant, installed new signs prohibiting swimming, motor 
boating and other adverse activities on the Pond, replaced all interior 
fluorescent lamps with low-mercury fluorescent lamps, continued painting 
interior of the plant, and replaced locks on all interior doors. 

196 



COOPERATION WITH OTHER TOWN DEPARTMENTS included: 
performing quarterly billing and clerical assistance for Sewer Department, 
lent backhoe and compressor to the DPW, worked with DPW to raise all 
street gate boxes on roads being paved, purchased required parts and 
assisted in the installation of new irrigation line for Woodside cemetery, 
alternate purchase of cold patch with DEP, donated to Town the fittings to 
add new 1 inch water line at Milliken Field and a 2 " meter for all the new 
fields at North Main Street, transferred a surplus truck to the DPW, and 
provided a new 10 inch water service to the High School renovation project. 
AVALON BAY. The proposed 250 unit Avalon Bay 40B project occupied a lot 
of our attention in 2002. We submitted comments to ZBA on the potential 
watershed impacts from the proposed development from sewage effluent, 
storm water runoff, and existing onsite contamination. Also, we worked 
cooperatively with Avalon to move our easement on the former Norfolk 
Conveyor property to meet their needs while still providing an effective 
access route to the Scituate Hill Water Storage Tank. 
WATERSHED PROTECTION. In 2002, the Water Commission took major 
steps to better protect our water resources, in addition to completing the 
Surface Water Supply Protection Plan. We were pleased to contribute 
$50,000 for the acquisition of the Barnes Property in Wheelwright Park, 
which helps preserve the watershed for our two well fields. We submitted 
comments to the Zoning Board of Appeals on the relocation of Graham 
Waste Services from Route 3A to Scituate Hill in the Sohier Street Well field 
watershed to suggest design improvements to reduce the potential impact of 
this facility to watershed quality. We also participated in and cooperated in 
the Town's Phase II Storm water Mapping Project with the town DPW, Board 
of Health, and Planning Board. We started to conduct a Limnology and 
Waters Edge Study of Lily Pond to better determine the current trophic state 
of the pond, identify sources of nutrient loading, and get recommendations 
for improvements, with a $25,000 grant we received from the state 
Department of Environmental Management. We started to conduct an 
Aquatic Habitat Safe Yield Study of the entire surface water supply, to 
determine the effect of our current withdrawals, and of potential increased 
withdrawals, on the stream flows in Bound Brook as it leaves our watershed 
and goes into Scituate. We worked with DEP to initiate the Source Water 
Assessment Program (SWAP) inventory of potential threats to watershed 
quality with DEP, and to develop a SWAP plan for the Water Department. To 
keep an eye on water quality, we conduct quarterly tests of surface water in 
our watershed, test groundwater from the bedrock wells between Cohasset 
Heights landfill (CHL) and Lily Pond, and have engineering consultants 
review the quarterly monitoring reports from CHL. 

The watershed boundary for the Lily Pond and Aaron River Watershed was 
revised by the Water Commission in 2002 to include additional area in 
Scituate that is tributary to and which drains into the Aaron River Reservoir. 
This new watershed area was identified by the First Herring Brook 
Watershed Initiative, a Scituate environmental group, and was confirmed by 
the Water Commission's consultants Norfolk Ram Group. The revised 



197 



watershed boundary, showing the new added area, is shown on the map at 
the end of the Water Commission report. 

GIS MAPPING. Also in 2002, the Water Commissjon worked closely with the 
Planning Board to incorporate the Commission's latest GIS version of the 
Water Resource District map (the watershed boundary within Cohasset) on 
to the revised Cohasset Zoning Map, which was produced using GIS. The 
Water Resource District is a zoning overlay district established under Section 
14 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaws in 1986 to protect the sources of our 
public drinking water supply. 

To support our ongoing watershed protection efforts, In 2002 our consultant 
Norfolk RAM completed a functional GIS ArcView® application for the Lily 
Pond/Aaron River Watershed. This system includes delineation of the 
watershed characteristics including: Land Use Activity, Potential Threats to 
the Watershed (e.g. spills, releases, and 21 E sites), Municipal Zoning and 
Open Space/Protected Areas, Parcels of Unknown Ownership, Wetlands and 
Flood Plains, and Un-developable land, and Watershed Sampling & Testing 
Points. This GIS application provides the Water Commission with a useful 
tool to evaluate the watershed for potential threats and open space 
acquisition, and to record changes and activity within the watershed. 
MBTA. We have been working on an ongoing basis with the MBTA to ensure 
that the Greenbush revitallzation includes appropriate mitigation for the water 
distribution system, including the placement of sleeves under road crossings, 
relocation of fire hydrants where necessary, and the relocation of the Sohier 
Street Wells away from the rail bed. 

PUBLIC EDUCATION. In 2002, we issued four newsletters, ''Your Water 
Department in our quarterly bills to keep our customers up to date on our 
activities. On July 1, we mailed our latest ''Water Quality Report to all 
Cohasset mail addresses to annually inform the entire Town of the source of 
their tap water and what contaminants have been detected in that water. 
FISH PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY. In 2002 we received notice from the 
Mass. Department of Public Health that the fish In the Aaron River Reservoir 
were contaminated with mercury, and we then notified the public by issuing a 
press release, posting a warning sign at the Reservoir, and putting a notice in 
our bill stuffer. Note that tests showed that the water itself is not 
contaminated with mercury. 

INCREASED SECURITY. Following the Attack on America on September 
11, 2001, all water departments across the country were confronted with the 
need to consider their existing security measures and to make upgrades 
where necessary. The Cohasset Water Commission has taken what they feel 
are all needed and prudent steps to increase security at all Water 
Department facilities to protect our assets from potential threats. We 
developed our security measures after consulting a number of sources, 
including Weston & Sampson, American Water Services, and the Cohasset 
Police Department. 

LAWSUITS. In 2002 we dealt with two lawsuits connected with the 
construction of the Scituate Hill Water Storage Tank. We settled a lawsuit 
against us from PDM, the contractor who built the tank, and at the end of 
2002 prepared to go to trial on the lawsuit by Westwood Limited Properties, 

198 



owner of the site, who is seeking more funds for the taking of the land for the 
tank and for the access to the tank. 

ELLIVIS MEADOW WELLFIELD. In 2002, the 1 00+-year-old Ellms Meadow 
Well field was replaced with a new well field composed on 5 new wells and a 
manifold pipe. A pump test was conducted to determine the quantity and 
quality of the groundwater present. We then submitted a Pump Test 
Application to DEP for the Ellms Meadow Well field, which will allow us to 
reactivate the well field when the application is approved in April or May 
2003, and once we build a new pump house. 

STATE GOVERNMENT. We have requested the Mass. Highway Dept. to 
grant us permanent access over their maintenance site property on Crocker 
Lane to the Scltuate Hill Water Storage Tank, which would be a better 
access than our current route over the former Norfolk Conveyor property. We 
have lobbied for passage of S-1872, which, as requested by the 2001 Annual 
Town Meeting, would allow Water Commissioners to serve in appointed town 
positions - the bill was passed by the Legislature and signed by the 
Governor and is in effect January 1m, 2003 as Chapter 439 of the Acts of 
2002. We thank Senator Hedlund and Rep. Bradley for their successful 
efforts to pass this bill. 

CONCLUSION. None of our accomplishments would have been possible 
without the vision and extraordinary efforts of the Water Commission in the 
1970's, under the leadership of Chairman Alan S. Murphy, who passed away 
during 2000, to build the Aaron River Reservoir and the Lily Pond Treatment 
Plant. On May 1 1 , 2003 we will commemorate the 25"^ year of operation of 
the Plant, and we invite the residents of Cohasset to join us at that event. 
During 2002, the Cohasset Water Commission has taken many major steps, 
which have succeeded in producing continued improvements to fire 
protection, water quality, and watershed protection for the people of 
Cohasset. We have accomplished these important achievements within our 
current rate structure, since our financial position remains excellent. The 
Board of Water Commissioners and the Water Department would like to 
thank all the Town officials, boards, and committees who have assisted the 
Water Department and the Board throughout 2002. We will continue to seek 
improvements to the water system in the coming years for the benefit of all 
ratepayers and the Town of Cohasset. 

Respectfully submitted. 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

John K. McNabb, Jr., Chairman 
Robert E. Kasameyer, Vice-Chairman 
Glenn A. Pratt. Clerk 



199 



Lily Pond/Aaron River Reservoir Watershed 
Revised June. 2002 







^■^ \ ){C>f'' SCiTUA'tE 

mi ^ \ 

I\ ' NOR WELL \ "^i 



,J Expanded Watershed Area 
/• Portion of South Swamp 
I Scituate 



A NORf'X>JLK 

^Ram Group 






^' 



Watershed Boundary 



MOA/» Of W*V£ft e OtltM SXMCAS 
BICMM A PItATT. C10»K 



200 



SEWER COMMISSION ANNUAL REPORT 



In 2O02, the Cohasset Sewer Commission continues to sewer existing 
residents and businesses to the systems. In addition, progress has been 
made in the design phase of the Little Harbor Sewer Project. 

We added 105 homes were connected in their respective sewer districts. We 
currently serve a total of 744 homes in both North and Central Cohasset. 

In the March 2002 Town Meeting, several sewer related articles passed. 
Article 8 agreed to have the sewer commission borrow $100,000 for esthetic 
improvements to the existing Sewer Plant and related buildings at the Elm 
Street facility. This, plus funding remaining from prior appropriations for the 
expansion of the original central Cohasset sewer district, will be sufficient for 
the project. The desire of the neighbors to improve the look of the facility 
prompted this action. Articles 9 and 10 requested $180,000 for the purpose 
of "preliminary engineering documents and corresponding cost estimates for 
the provision of the sewer collection infrastructure in the Little Harbor Sewer 
District". Because the state had delayed the start of reimbursements to the 
town for its school construction projects it was decided to phase the design 
and engineering for the project over several years. This way continuous 
progress can be made and the town can be ready to build the project when 
the school building reimbursements commence, without major impact on the 
tax rate. All articles passed. 

In North Cohasset, widespread grinder pump failures were experienced as a 
result of lightning storms during the summer. The manufacturer replaced 
approximately 75 control units. The town tested 25 sample houses and 
confirmed adequacy of the residential grounding systems, which eliminated 
this as a potential cause. Research is continuing on this problem. 

The performance of the wastewater treatment plant is excellent, and all 
effluent concentration parameters are well below the limits in our discharge 
permit. Both the sewer commission and abutting neighbors have approved 
plant esthetic improvements. The contract has been awarded and work will 
start in the spring of 2003. Improvements in landscaping, painting, and 
siding will help the plant to better blend into the natural environment. Also, 
we have approved a new five-year operations contract with US Filter to 
continue operations of the plant. 

Respectfully Submitted: 

R. Gary Vandenveil, Jr. 
Raynriond Kasperowicz 
Sean Cunning 



201 



COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Cohasset Housing Authority is a public agency with a five member 
Board of Commissioners, four of whom stand for Town Election and the 
remaining Commissioner is appointed by the Governor; 

Commissioner Term Expires 

Ann C. Barrett, Chairwoman 2004 

Ralph Perroncello, Vice Chairman 2007 

John D. Muncey, Treasurer 2006 

Helen A. Nothnagle (Governor's Appointee effective December 1 3, 2002) 
(The Governor's Appointee remains in the position until a new Commissioner 
is appointed.) 

Joanne Young has relocated and is no longer available to complete her term 

through 2005. 

Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 121B required the Board of 

Commissioners to appoint a new Commissioner in concert with the Board of 

Selectmen. 

The Cohasset Housing Authority has a staff of two 

Marilyn A. LeBlanc, Executive Director and Jill A. Rosano, Maintenance 
Supervisor 

hasset's public housing inventory includes 64 state units of Chapter 667 
Elderiy/Disabled housing located at 60 Elm Street, 12 units of Chapter 689 
Special Needs housing located at 72, 74, 76 Elm Street. These 78 state 
units are subsidized by the Department of Housing and Community 
Development. The 31 Section 8 Program units providing rental assistance 
for families are subsidized by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. These elderiy units come under the category of property 
management and are not equipped with the amenities of assisted living. Our 
annual subsidies are granted upon successful annual, semi-annual and 
quarteriy reviews of management and regulatory compliance. 

Eligibility standards for our Elderiy/Disabled complex, Harborview, were in 
1 998 and now Include the maximum allowable income of $40,600 and the 
age for admission Is 60. 

With the loss of many residents over the last year our Wait List had swindled 
to only 2 applicants but after a news article, It has grown to 31 applicants. 
Our present Wait List consists of 31 elderiy and disabled applicants, 7 of 
whom are local residents. Local residents under state have a preference on 
our Wait List. "Local Preference" is defined by state regulation as "any 
applicant living and/or working in the Town". 



202 



The Board of Commissioners recommends that application for subsidized 
housing at Harborview be made before the need becomes critical. There is 
an approximate one to two year wait for and apartment by a local resident 
and longer for a non-resident. 

Modernization grants for capital improvements are awarded by our funding 
source, the Department of Housing and Community Development. One 
grant from the Department remains incomplete. All others that were 
requested have been completed. We continue to anticipate that our grant for 
the walkways will see some progress in the Spring of 2003. We are hoping 
that the design for a reconfiguration of our walkways will begin within this 
calendar year. To date the grant to repair the walkways if the only 
outstanding project not to be completed from the 1994 and 1996 Condition 
Assessment Report Grants. A Condition Assessment Report (our primary 
vehicle for grants awarded for capital improvements) for 2001 requested 
repair and siding for the building envelope and for a major upgrade to 
improve site security. Another Condition Assessment Report will be 
submitted for the year 2003 requests the same improvements. 

The Board of Commissioners continues in its efforts to pursue their 
mandates of providing affordable, safe and secure housing, of reviewing and 
updating regulatory policies and procedures to remain current with new 
legislation and remains diligent in the research of opportunities to create 
affordable housing for those with the greatest need. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann C. Barrett, Chairwoman 
Ralph Perroncello, Vice Chairman 
John D. Muncey, Treasurer 
Helen A. Nothnagle 



203 



ELDER AFFAIRS 

The Cohasset Elder Affairs has been in existence as a Town Department 
since 1968, from a voice vote at the spring Annual Town Meeting. Our 
mission and function remains the same today as it did thirty-five years ago. 
This provides information, advocacy and resources to the elders and their 
families In Cohasset. We continue to be the community focal point for 
services and programs that can assist, support and supplement the concerns 
and needs of our older residents, their families and friends. 

The primary responsibilities of the Cohasset Elder Affairs focus on five 
pertinent areas: information and referrals, advocacy, outreach, transportation 
and education. During 2002, Elder Affairs met these responsibilities by the 
development and implementation of pertinent programs and services both 
here at the Senior Center and in cooperation with numerous community 
agencies and organizations like the Selectmen's Office, Town Clerk, Board of 
Health, Police and Fire Department. At the end of the 2002 fiscal year, we 
provided services and and/or programs to over 800 individuals with one full 
time employee, four part-time employees and two Senior Core workers, 
along with 150 volunteers. Our programs and services were unique due to 
the great commitment from staff and volunteers that all help make these 
programs work. 

The Outreach Program continues to be one of our top priority programs. 
Outreach is defined as a support service that aids in providing an avenue for 
the provision of services for the older adult to include their spouse, caregiver 
and/or family member. Outreach works with those older adults who may 
need support with fuel assistance, transportation evaluation, housing 
concerns, shopping assistance, telephone reassurance or may be in an "at 
risk" situation. Our Outreach Worker, Carol Barrett, works with families, 
agencies, local resources and volunteers to insure everything is being done 
to assist and support the elder resident to stay at home for as long as it is 
safely possible. 

Transportation is another responsibility and necessary asset to our services. 
With the expertise of 2 part-time medical drivers and 50 volunteer drivers, we 
provide over thirty hours of transportation services weekly encompassing 
over 1,314 rides to 99 people over 60 to special programs and events. We 
also provide medical rides within a fifteen mile radius to 1 53 different people 
with 308 rides by Ham Tewksbury and Jim Donahue. Some destinations are 
local physicians and dentists but, also. Crown Colony, The Driftway, Harvard 
Vanguard, Quincy Medical Center, South Shore Hospital, Stetson, Eye 
Health and other Weymouth Medical Services. It is with great pleasure that 
we owe our thanks to Dolores Jakaus for the many hours of hard work in 
making this transportation effort possible. 



204 



In addition to the transportation program with the CEA van, we have special 
transportation services for medical appointments that cannot be served 
through our own van and a back-up system with Fish. Cancer Society, MAP- 
5 and American Cancer Society. They ail help us to provide the best services 
possible. We have been grateful for two transportation grants that allow us to 
provide appropriate transportation into Boston to other medical facilities 
outside the south shore area. In the past year we provided rides elders living 
In Cohaaset, Hingham, Hull, Norwell & Scituate. The destination include: 
Beth Israel-Deaconess, Brigham & Women's, Mass Eye & Ear, Mass 
General Hospital, Boston Medical, Faulkner Hospital, Dana Farber Hospital, 
V.A. Hospitals and many, many more physician and specialist offices in 
Boston. In both cases, they are funded via competitive grants through South 
Shore Elder Services (Older American's Act) and the Executive Office of 
Elder Affairs. 

The Shopping Assistance Program In 2002 has proved to be successful and 
has helped a number of frail elders within the community. Carol Barrett visits 
the elders at home and Jim Donohue drives each Tuesday to the market. 
Volunteers assist the seniors with shopping and at home, they help put the 
food away. The program is funded from an lll-B / South Shore Elder Services 
Grant. 

During the past year, the Senior Center sponsored a variety of health 
education programs in conjunction with local agencies. This was a follow-up 
to the Caregivers Program and was very well attended. Blood Pressure 
screening and Foot Care was offered monthly and arrangements with the 
Town Public Health Nurse and the Visiting Nurse Assoc, also increased in 
participation. 

Margaret Casey was very busy planning a great variety of presentations 
including school age children visiting the Center and on health topics 
important to the Cohasset Senior Center, such as osteoporosis, dementia, 
prostate, nutrition, long term planning and other related topics. 

In May, the CEA and the Norfolk County Sheriffs office sponsored a Bmnch 
at St. Anthony's church for its First Anniversary. Approximately 75 seniors 
attended, and Anna's Gourmet Club prepared the food. It was great! 

This has been a very fast paced year with many changes and we are proud 
of the many challenges we faced and accomplished with the staff and 
volunteers. 

The Cohasset Elder Affairs functions as an arm of Town Government and, as 
such, wishes to acknowledge the ongoing continued support shown to us by 
the Board of Selectmen, The Town Manager Mark Haddad, Town Clerk, 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department, Town 
Treasurer and our best town Finance Director, Michael Buckley. 



205 



Without the many helpers including staff, board members, "friends" and 
volunteers, the staff would be very hard pressed to carry out the mission of 
the Cohasset Elder Affairs. We also appreciate the support of the citizens of 
Cohasset. With all their support, the Council continues to define and re- 
define its mission and to meet the growing and the changing needs of the 
community. 

COHASSET COMMON HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

January 30, 2002 

New members of the CCHDC: 

Charles Furtado- Common Resident Member 

Peter Wood- Non-Common Resident, Alternate 

Voted to recommend award of Landscape Preservation Grant for Cohasset 

Common to Carl Lynch/Denig, Herman and Sandell. 

March 29, 2002 

Received notice of Jacqueline Clark's resignation as Chairperson and as a 

Member of CCHDC 

Open Forum to hear presentation by Lynch/Denig & Sandell for Common 

Landscape Preservation 

Application received from Town of Cohasset for benches on Common 

April 4, 2002 

CCHDC elections: Marion Atkinson and Mary Larson were voted Chair and 

Vice-Chair respectively 

Letter sent to Town Manager deferring application for benches on Common 

pending ongoing study for Common Preservation 

Notice was given for Public Hearing on April 24 to consider redesign of 

previously approved plans for the Unitarian Parish House 

April 24, 2002 

Welcomed Janice Crowley, Realtor, as new member of CCHDC 

Re-designed plans for Unitarian Parish House were unanimously approved 

(Certificate #216) 

Commission attended Public Workshop outlining Landscape Preservation 

Study by Denig/Sandell 



May 21, 2002 

Elizabeth Bates welcomed as new Alternate Common Resident Member 
Meeting to consider application by Town of Cohasset for benches on 
Common. Voted unanimously to approve temporary placement of benches in 
front of Town Hall (Certificate #21 7) 

June 12, 2002 

Purpose of meeting was to review Landscape Preservation Plans and make 

recommendations as Cohasset Common Historic District Commission per 

206 



request of CRC. List of recommendations were submitted to the Board of 
Selectmen 

Acting upon request of a new CCHDC member, a re-election of officers was 
held. Marion Atkinson and Mary Larson were re-elected as Chair and Vice- 
Chair respectively. Charles Furtado was elected Secretary 

August 26. 2002 

Commission did a final evaluation of Landscape Preservation Plans and the 

CCHDC recommendations in preparation for presentation at the Board of 

Selectmen's Meeting on September 24, 2002 

In response to a request by the Unitarian Parish House, the Commission 

unanimously approved a color change of the blinds to the original color, 

Essex Green (Certificate #218) 

Town of Cohasset is found to be in violation of Certificate #217 designating 

location for temporary placement of benches. Letter was sent to Board of 

Selectmen requesting a resolution to this violation 

September 18, 2002 

In the attempt to amicably resolve the issue of the Town of Cohasset's un- 
addressed violation of CCHDC's by-laws, it was agreed that the Town should 
re-apply for a new Certificate of Appropriateness to accommodate the 
existent placement of the two benches 

October 23, 2002 

Town of Cohasset re-applied to place two benches on the Common where 

they currently stand. This certificate (#219) was approved with the conditions 

"unless change is necessitated by the execution of the Common Master 

Plan" 

Application presented by Yasmine and Connie Afshar to place a curved 

granite memorial bench near base of flag pole in memory of Paul "P.J." 

Trendowitz. This application was accepted as Appropriate subject to the 

Town's approval and the Common Master Plan (Certificate #220) 



Miscellaneous: 

Elizabeth Bates resigned as Alternate Common Resident Member 

William Hurley has replaced Elizabeth Bates as the Alternate Common 

Resident Member 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Atkinson, Chairperson 
Charles Furtado, Secretary 



207 



PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



The Trustees of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, Sheila Evans, June 
Hubbard, Roger Lowe, Agnes McCann, Sarah Pease, Barbara power, Carol 
Riley, Patience Towie, and Roger Whitley, together with Director Janet 
Husband, Library Director, and staff continued to serve the public in the old 
facility while preparing to move to the new. 

Funding for the new building proceeded on schedule. First, the Cohasset 
Library Building Fund, Inc. raised over 1.1 million dollars. Second, the 
Trustees and Director completed a successful grant application and received 
a Massachusetts Library Construction Grant of $1,529,000 of which 
$1,379,000 has been paid to date. Third, the Town negotiated the sale of the 
old library for an amount in excess of the $700,000 that was planned by the 
Trustees. 

With a construction budget safely in hand, groundbreaking for the renovation 
of the old Joseph Osgood School occurred on January 17, 2002, and a 
document of Substantial Completion was issued on December 19, 2002. 
With the building almost ready for furnishings, books and staff, the Trustees 
were able to turn their attention to a search for a new Director to fill the 
opening created by Janet Husband's early retirement. Trustee Sheila Evans 
capably chaired this successful search. 

The Investment Advisory Committee, chaired by Barbara Power, again 
recommended a conservative investment policy and a "take-out" rate of 4% 
and the board adopted that policy. The library Trustees continue to b| 
grateful to their volunteer advisors, Laurens Maclure and John Chase and for 
gifts of cash and stock received this year. The return on this generosity 
supports 35 percent of the book budget. 

The Friends, led by Linda Wakeman, provided books, museum passes, 
library cards, fund raising and children's programming as well as providing 
state of the art audiovisual equipment for the Meeting Room at the new 
library. 

The Trustees would like to thank all involved for the new library in Cohasset. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Patience Garrick TowIe, Chair Person 



208 



SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 



New England Association of Sctiools and Colleges Self-Study Dominates 
Year-long Examination at South Shore 

Typically one of the most daunting yet beneficial processes for any 
educational institution is its decennial Internal review of all operations, and 
the subsequent peer review by a visiting team of professionals from similar 
schools throughout the New England region. The New England Association 
of Schools and Colleges, through its Commission on Technical and Career 
Institutions, will conduct such a four-day visiting team accreditation 
evaluation in the Fall of 2003 at South Shore Vocational Technical High 
School. Preparation for the visit is already underway. Staff in-service time 
for the year has been committed to the many hours needed for the school's 
"self-study," a comprehensive look at everything from cun-iculum and 
Instruction, facilities, budget, staff and students and governance. 

Primary in South Shore Vo-Tech's scrutiny of its full operation is found In the 
evaluation of how it views itself measured against a comprehensive set of 
membership standards established by the NEASC. These standards are: 
School Philosophy and Goals 

2. School and Community Relations 

3. The Educational Program 

4. Educational Media Services 

5. Student Services 
Student Records 
School Staff 
Administration 

Finance and Business Operations 
School Facilities 
School Atmosphere 

South Shore continues to serve as a valuable regional resource to the eight 
member communities, and most importantly as a meaningful high school 
pathway for nearly 550 students presented with a wide array of academic, 
technical and career preparatory opportunities. To this end, the past year 
saw South Shore planning, implementing or accomplishing several new 
initiatives. Among the efforts to provide the best available delivery of 
curriculum, positive facility and environment and updated technical 
equipment have been: a new wireless computer lab with internet linking 
capabilities, a piloted foreign language class (Spanish) for the first time ever 
in the school, installation of a "Tight Tank" for the cosmetology program to 
eliminate potential chemical runoff into the aquifer, improved lighting and 
signage, expansion of the gymnasium facility for weight, conditioning and 
exercise training, and several improvements to technical equipment school- 
wide. 

209 



Continuing to produce graduates who are equipped with marketable 
technical skills, ready to face a challenging and ever changing world of work, 
South Shore Vo-Tech has ranked in the top 10% of state-wide regional 
technical schools (26 schools across the Commonwealth) in terms of 
academic and vocational achievement, graduate placement, and 
performance on the mandated MCAS testing administered to 10^*^ grade 
students. Equally significant is the positive relationship, which has been 
forged with member towns in serving the best interests and needs of young 
people and the community at large. 

The South Shore Regional School District strives to utilize the feedback from 
the world of Business and Industry, from the NEASC process, from Advisory, 
School Council and Parent Association groups to provide the most beneficial 
and comprehensive delivery of educational services possible. To that end, 
we value the support of our district member towns and seek to continue, and 
build upon, the shared mission of providing the best and most 
comprehensive technical and career experiences we can. When our 
students are skilled, they truly become productive adults and citizens. 
Currently, 7 of the total enrollment of 533 are from Cohasset. 

While at South Shore our obvious priority this year is the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges decennial evaluation, we want toy" 
continue to be active partners with all our constituencies. We look forward p 
the ongoing and positive relationship, which has been fostered by so man\/ in 
the community. / 

Respectfully submitted, 

David M. Kneeland 

Cohasset Representative 

South Shore Regional School District Committee 



210 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 

It gives us great pleasure to report to residents, the activities of their 
Recreation Commission for 2002. 

During the year, approximately 4,600 Individuals of all ages participated In a 
variety of structured programs, activities and events. While budget 
restrictions persist, our latitude of use of the Revolving Account Fund for 
100% Self-Supporting Programs are continuing under this financial 
mechanism causing no impact upon taxpayers. In fact, via the Recreation 
Commission's policy to charge an Administrative Service Fee charge to all 
R.A.F. sponsored programs, taxpayers are reimbursed for the cost of the 
recreation budget. That Is, revenues produced via Administrative Service 
Fee's, coupled with budget sponsored program fees, service fees and 
charges helps reimburse taxpayers for the budget of their Recreation 
Commission. Only revenue on deposit in the General Fund can be 
considered recapitalization revenue. 

During Fiscal Year 2002, ending June 30, 2002, the Recreation Commission 
produced for the General Fund $65,250.90. $3,000.00 was produced for use 
by the Commission via grants and matching grant funds. Concurrently, 
$48,977.00 was transacted via Revolving Account Funds for 100% Self- 
Supporting via fees charged participants for a variety of services. 
Approximately another $235,000.00 was transacted via other and direct self- 
supporting financial systems during F.Y. 2002, manifesting a collective 
$352,227.90 of recreational services to residents. These figures do not 
include the thousands of man-hours that are annually donated by hundreds 
of residents, In support of a variety of program operations. 

Due to the severe financial difficulties town government faces during Fiscal 
Year 2004, the Recreation Commission aims to become 75% to 100% self- 
supporting via revenue dedicated to the General Fund of the town only. Via 
fee charges and administrative service fees to contractors to the Commission 
our Intent will be to recapitulate about $100,000.00 to $120,000.00 back to 
taxpayers. It is our intent to do this with as little financial impact upon users of 
our services as possible. 

Municipal recreation is for the benefit of all residents and we continue to 
direct our efforts towards assurance of equal access and opportunity to the 
entire community. To this end, a specific and calculated portion of revenue 
was not collected this year from residents who were temporarily unable to 
pay full fee charges for services. In many instances time was volunteered in 
lieu of full fee payments, benefiting the department and participants of 
programs. 

Programming represents only one aspect of the responsibilities, duties, and 
functions as prescribed and conferred upon the recreation commission by 
both Massachusetts General Laws and By-Laws of the Town. Continuing 

211 



efforts are focused upon upgrading and renovating existing outdoor 
recreational facilities under jurisdiction of the commission. Often times these 
undertakings are coordinated via a lend of both public and privately solicited 
resources and efforts, easing taxpayers' burden. 

Numerous town departments and officials have continued to support our 
effort in this area for which we remain enormously grateful. Further, we 
remain indebted to many private and civic groups for their magnanimous 
efforts and resources. 

The seven member, elected board of the Recreation Commissioner's, 
volunteer their services to the town and department meeting regularly in 
order to discuss a wide-spectrum of topics relative to the leisure needs and 
pursuits of all residents. Further, the Commissioner's establish policy, and 
provide departmental direction, support, and assistance. Each meeting is 
publicly posted at least one week prior to date and residents are cordially 
invited to attend and participate in any meeting. Essential to our proper 
function, and absolutely vital towards success, is the ability to remain 
responsive to the dynamic community needs. We consider your input and 
feedback our most important source of guidance. 

Degree of community Interest and support for recreational and leisure-time 
services can directly be measured by two essential factors. First and most 
logically, interest is measured by the level of participation by residents in 
various services. Secondly and perhaps as important, interest and support is 
readily recognizable by the extraordinary numbers of volunteers who donate 
their time, effort and expertise in conduct with a number of our programs, 
events and activities. 

The recreation commission wishes to acknowledge gratitude to the many 
individuals, civic and business organizations, school and sport's groups, town 
boards, committees and departments who have lent their support and 
assistance in our efforts to best serve the recreational and leisure needs of 
residents of all ages. While too numerous to mention each name, none are 
forgotten and all are sincerely appreciated and thanked. 



Respectfully yours, 

Richard P. Barrow, Chairman 
Anthony J. Carbone, Vice-Chalrman 
Frederick H. Grassie, Jr., Secretary 
Lillian M. Curley 
Mary K. Muncey 
James H. Richardson 
Wallace B. St.John 
John M. Worley, Director 



212 



Youth Resources Committee 

It Is with distinct pleasure that the Youth Resources Committee submits their 
Annual Report to residents of Cohasset. 

Having completed the transformation of the 60 year old town highway 
garage, to a teen center for Cohasset youngsters, opening the doors January 
8*^ 2000, we now begin our 3^ year of operation. 

The Garage, when open for general use or rented for functions, sports video 
games, pool table, big screen TV as well as a variety of other electronic and 
non-electronic games. 

As the town enters difficult and uncertain financial times, it will be encumbent 
upon us to operate the Garage on a close to 100% self-supporting basis. 
That is, we have been able to pay, via small per capita fee charges to 
youngsters for dances and special events, all of our operating costs, ie: 
heat, lights, phone, supplies, games, etc. etc. However, via $15,600.00 
Inserted in the recreation commission budget starting in Fiscal Year 2002, we 
were able to pay for staffing of the Garage. Due to the current financial 
deficits faced by the state and town, $10,000.00 of the $15,600.00 has been 
eliminated from the budget. 

However, via the continued support and generosity of residents, civic and 
business organizations and per capita fee charges to the youngsters, we feel 
this deficit can be accommodated. Anyone wishing to help with this 
endeavor can find self-addressed envelopes just outside the Recreation 
Department office, in the foyer of Town Hall. 

The youth of Cohasset and members of the youth resources committee wish 
to extend their most sincere gratitude to the numerous residents, business 
organizations, town boards, officials and departments who have generously 
donated money, time, effort, materials and supplies towards our project. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jack Worley, Chairman 



213 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 
2002 

This year was a very active and successful year for the Law Department: 

1. Advice & Legal Documents. Numerous advisory opinions were rendered 
throughout the year to various Town officials and Boards relating to a wide variety of 
issues and subjects. Frequent and ongoing attention was given to reviewing and/or 
drafting Bylaws, numerous contract documents and agreements, easements, 
procurement documents, public road documents, Wan^nts for Town meetings (both 
special and annual town meetings), compliance with State Ethics Act, various Town 
rules and regulations, proposed legislation of benefit to the Town and other legal 
documents. 

2. Administrative Agency Proceedings. The Town was involved with a number 
of state or federal administrative agencies, including issues before the Appellate Tax 
Board, Department of Environmental Protection, Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Commission, Army Corps of Engineers and Department of Revenue. 

3. Projects. We assisted with issues related to the Community Preservation 
Act, Heather Drive drainage issues, various private road issues, North Cohasset 
Sewer project (including easement/reaJ estate issues, bettennents and various other 
documents), Central Cohasset Sewer Project, licensing issues, Hageriy f^roperty 
issues, the MBTA Greenbush line, Cohasset Heights Landfill issues, the new water 
tower, various ballot and election issues, 40B Comprehensive Peprfiit Issues, the 
acquisition of the Barnes Wildlife Refuge, sale of the Pratt Library/building and the 
Jacobs Meadow tidal flood gates pn^ject ' 

4. Labor Issues. We assisted the Town in general employee matters and In 
connection with employee grievances, labor artDitrations and retirement issues. We 
also provided advice fi'om time to time during the year regarding the Interpretation 
and application of collective bargaining agreements and the processing of grievances. 
In addition, several non-union personnel issues, including possible disciplinary 
proceedings, occurred during this year. 

5. Litigation. As of December 31, 2002, the number of claims and lawsuits in 
which the Town is a party total 32 as follows: 

3 Matterslnvolving the Board of Selectmen: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Town of Cohasset, Suffolk Sup Ct, No. 38652 
Advocates for Transportation Altematives, Inc., et al. v. Town of Cohasset, et al., 
Plymouth Sup. Ct, C.A. No. 01-01148 

2 Matter involving the Water Commission 

Westwood Properties Limited Partnership, Westwood Properties, Inc., General 
Partner v. Town of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup Ct, No. 00-013 

Westcott Construction v. Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. and Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company v. Town of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup Ct, CA No. 01-1791 

1 Matter involving the Sewer Commission 

Kevin Butler v. Town of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup Ct, No. 00-01579 

5 Matters involving the Conservation Commission 

214 



Isabel Kelley v. Cohasset Conservation Commission, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 01- 

00538 

Bank of New York v. Chang and Town of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 01-2355 

Nader v. Cohasset Conservation Commission and Town Of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup 

Ct, CA No. 99-1076 

Town of Cohasset Conservation Commission v. Justin Hutchins, d/b/a the Village 

Greenery, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-1440 

Herzfelder V. Cohasset Conservation Commission et al., Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02- 

0587 

15 Matters involving the Zoning Board of Appeals: 

Emanuello v. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup. Ct., C.A. 99-905 
Cohasset Harbor Marina v. Board of Appeals and Kulkuskie, Land Court 259744 
Chief Justice Cushing Highway Corporation v. Board of Appeals, Massachusetts 
Land Ct, No. 243862 

Cohasset Harbor Marina v. Board of Appeals and Huriey, Land Ct. No. 259078 
Trustees of Gulph River Realty Trust v. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 
00-859 

Planning Board v. Trustees of Gulph River Realty Trust and Board of Appeals, 
Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 00-858 

Aaron R. Hassan v. Board of Appeals, Land Court No. 2668966 
Ellen M. Morrissey v. Board of Appeals, Land Court No. 263788 
Michael J. Huriey and Victoria C. Huriey v. Board of Appeals of Cohasset et a!., 
Norfolk Sup. Ct. C.A. No. 01-361 

Cohasset HariDor Marina, Inc. v. Board of Health, Land Court No. 270044 
McNary v. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-661 
Sears v. Board of Appeals and Leonard P. Kupsc, Tmstee of LPK: ARMF Nominee 
Trust, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-1442 
Plotner V. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-01565 
Madigan v. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-01641 
Fitzgerald v. Board of Appeals, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-1417 

2 Matters involving the Planning Board: 

David E. Walsh v. Planning Board, Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 01-01881 
BartDara Campbell v. Planning Board et al., Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-330 

1 Matter involving the Department of Public Wori^s 

Claiborne v. Town of Cohasset, Norfolk Sup. Ct. C.A. 99-01 105 

1 Matters involving the Harbomiaster 

Cohasset HariDor Marina, Inc. v. Town of Cohasset and Cohasset Harbormaster, 
Mass. Land Court No. 250344 

1 Matter Involving the Police Department 

Davenport v. Town of Cohasset et al., Mass. Commission Against Discrimination, 
Docket No. 02 BEM03590, EEOC/HUD No. 16CA300193 

1 Claims pending: 

Jane Doe v. Cohasset Police Department 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul R. DeRensis 
TOWN COUNSEL 

215 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



I am pleased to submit the Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report for the Cohasset Public 
Schools. 

Cohasset Public Schools 
Mission 

To encourage and expect maximum achievement 
through a supportive learning community which 
strives to develop ethical and responsible citizens 
who love to learn. 

This year marked the second year of the construction projects at the Deer Hill 
Elementary and Middle-High Schools. I am pleased to report that the work at Deer 
Hill was completed in December '02 both on time and on budget. The work at the 
Middle-High School will continue for one more year with a scheduled date of 
completion in December of '03. ^ 



In addition to the construction, and upon its completion, the school district will be 
preparing for a new organizational an-angement. Joseph Osgood Elementary will 
become grades pre-k to 2, Deer Hill will become grades 3 to 5/the Middle School will 
become grades 6 to 8 and the High School grades 9 to 1 2. ^ 

On the academic side the district continues to do well in the mandated MCAS Testing 
program with outstanding achievement levels at the high school level. 

During the year the Middle-High School was visited by the New England Association 
of Schools and Colleges to be reviewed for continued accreditation. We expect to 
have a final report with recommendations in the near future. 

Of particular note in the upcoming months will be the impact of the financial crisis in 
the State of Massachusetts as it relates to education. The challenge which lies ahead 
will be to preserve the quality of education in Cohasset with limited resources on the 
horizon. 

Technology continues to be an integral part of the learning process as all facilities are 
fully equipped with computer labs and teaching personnel. There has been support 
for expanding this initiative within available funds from the construction projects with a 
return of 60% on the dollar as reimbursed by the State. 

We continue to be excited about the future of education for the Cohasset community, 
and we embrace the goal of providing quality educational programs for all of our 
children. 



Dr. Edward Malvey 
Superintendent of Schools 



216 



Cohasset Public Schools 

Foundation Enrollment October 1, 2002 

Girls Boys Total 



Half-day Kindergarten 


52 


55 


107 


Grade 1 


47 


66 


113 


Grade 2 


60 


63 


123 


Grade 3 


65 


58 


123 


Sub total 


224 


242 


466 


Grade 4 


59 


62 


121 


Grade 5 


63 


69 


132 


Grade 6 


56 


55 


111 


Sub total 


178 


186 


364 


Grade 7 


40 


57 


97 


Grade 8 


50 


70 


120 


Sub total 


90 


127 


217 


Grade 9 


54 


45 


99 


Grade 10 


37 


42 


79 


Grade 11 


49 


39 


88 


Grade 12 


44 


35 


79 


Sub total 


184 


161 


345 


Total 


678 


716 


1392 



Revised 1/10/03 



217 



COLLEGES ACCEPTING CHS CLASS OF 2002 



Allegheny College 

American International College 

Ame|ica*i;yniversity 

Assiifetpdbn College 

Art Institvite of Boston 

Babson College 

Barnard College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Bowdoin College 

Bryant College 

Calvin College 

Carlton College 

Clevelariti Institute of Art 

Colby College 

Colgate University 

College of Charleston 

College of the Holy Cross 

Colorado College 

Curry College 

Endicott College 

Fordham University 

Framingham State College 

Franklin Pierce College 

Georgetown University 

George Washington University 

Hartwick College 

Harvard University 

Ithica College 

Johnson & Wales University 

Keene State 

Lasell College 

Le Toumeau University/Texas 

Loyola College/Maryland 

Lynchburg College 

Lynn University 

Marist College 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Massachusetts Maritime 

McGill University 

Merrimack College 

Middlebury College 

Museum School of Fine Art 

Newbury 

New York University 

Nichols College 

Northeastern University 

Northwestern University 

Norwich University 



Otis College of Art «fc Design 

Plymouth State 

Pratt at Munson 

Providence College 

Quinnipiac College 

Randolph-Macon College 

Rhode Island College 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Roanoke College 

RPI 

Roger Williams College 

St. Anselm College 

Sl John's University 

St. Lawrence University 

St. Michael's College 

Salem State College 

Salve Regina University 

School of Arts Institute/Chicago 

Skidmore College 

Stonehill College , 

Suffolk University 

Syracuse University 

Trinity College 

Tufts University 

Tulane University 

Union College 

University of Arizona 

University of California/Santa Barbara 

University of Colorado/Boulder 

University of Delaware 

University of Florida 

University of Maine/Farmington 

University of Mass/Ainherst 

University of Mass/Boston 

University of Mass/Dartmouth 

University of New Hampshire 

University of Southern New Hampshire 

University of Rhode Island 

University of Richmond 

University of Southern Califomia/LA 

University of Vermont 

Vermont Tech College 

Wake Forrest University 

Washington University of St. Louis 

Westem New England College 

Westfield State College 

Wheaton College 

Williams College 



218 



SCHOOL PROFILE 

Cohasset is a residential community of about 7600 population situated on the coast 20 miles south of Boston. Most of the residci 
are engaged in professional and business occupations in the city of Boston. The town is one of a high socioeconomic sianjs. 



SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



Grade 9 -75; Grade 10 



91; Grade 11 -81; Grade 12 -J 
GRADE DISTRIBUTION 
Based on grades in academic courses only. 



2001-2002 



Total - 327 



A B C D F 

38% 41% 15% 4% 2% 



Students are ranked by the recommendations of the N.A.S.S.P. and A.A.C.R.A.O. 

PLEASE NOTE: Achievement standards and academic expectations are unusually high in this very 
traditional college preparatory high school. Students report an average of 2-3 hours of 
homework daily. In the past 10 years the average of all students pursuing advanced 
education was 91%. 



ACCREDITATION 

New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools latest accreditation - 1992 
ADVANCED EDUCATION (Class of 2001) 



4 Yr. Colleges 2 Yr. Colleges 

Public Private Public Private Work 

24% . 64% 0% 2% 4% 

90% to further education 



Prep School 
2% 



Service 



Other Schools 
2% 



Undecid 
2% 



STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO: 9-1 (Includes All Professional Staff) 

53% of all academic classes have 20 or fewer students currently enrolled 

Each subject area is grouped homogeneously independently of other subjects. Each academic discipline has honors (Level 1) 
grouping. We have been a participant in the Advanced Placement Program for the past 39 years. Advanced Placement courses a 
offered in art, calculus, English, biology, computer science, European History,U.S. History, Latin, Chemistry, French and Spanis 
Language courses employ the use of a language laboratory. 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 
(CLASS OF 2002) 

The mean scores below reflect the test performance of Cohasset High School Seniors. These scores are taken from 
the College Board 2002 ATP Summary Report. 



SAT I Mean Scores 
Verbal = 563 Math = 558 

N.B. The Scholastic Aptitude Test was taken 
by 97% of the graduating class. 



SAT II Mean Scores (5 or more test takers) 

Biology M 698 

WriUng 637 

Math Level IC 621 

Literature 667 

Math Level UC 658 

Spanish 616 

U.S. History 688 

Chemistry 620 

Biology E 684 



219 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT GRADE DISTRTOUTION 

BY EXAM AND MEAN SCORES 
(5 or more test takers) 



EXAM 


_5j 


„ .4, • 


|3 


2,1 


MEAN 

SCORE 

1 Mean 


Biology 


2 


6 


3 






3.91 


Calculus 


4 


3 


- 


- 




4.57 


Chemisty 


3 


2 


2 


2 




2.71 


Eng, Lang. 


5 


8 


6 


3 




3.68 


European History 


2 


7 


6 


3 




3.44 


French Lang. 


- 


2 


1 


1 




2.80 


Latin Lit 


.- 


•- 


1 


- 




1.33 



Seventy Seven (77%) of all exams taken received a score of three or better 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

in September, 1997 Cohasset High School changed from an 8 period 42 minute scheduling model to a 5 period 90 minuu 
block format This plan was instituted to better meet the mandates of<time and learning under Massachusetts State Education Reform 
As part of the restructuring, all study halls have been eliminated. Classes also rotate through the schedule and one period is droppec 
daily. With the block schedule, the length of courses varies from one quarter, to one semester, to three quarters. All students ar< 
required to take 3 quarters of English each year. Advanced Placement courses are a full year as well. The majority of the remaininj 
academic classes are one semester in length. 



COURSE LEGEND 
WEIGHTED COURSES 

Legend: Level 1 is honors, level 2 is college preparatory, AP is Advanced Placement. 



COURSE 

English 


LEVELS 


COURSE 


LEVELS 


COURSE 

World Langyage 


LEVEL 


English 9 


(1,2) 


Investigating Matter 


(1.2) 


French 1 


(2) 


English 10 


(1,2) 


Investigating Energy 


(1,2) 


French 2 


(1) 


English 11 


(AP,2) 


Biology 


(AP,1.2) 


French 3 


(1) 


English 12 


(AP,2) 


Chemistry 


(AP,1,2) 


French 4 


(1) 






Physics 


(1.2) 


French 


(AP) 


Mathematics 




Adv.Topics in Chemistry 


(1) 


Spanish 1 


(2) 


Algebra I 


(2) 


Adv. Topics in Physics 


(1) 


Spanish 2 


(1,2) 


Geometry 


(1.2) 


Anatomy & Physiology 


(1) 


.Spanish 3 


(1.2) 


Algebra n 


(1,2) 


Enviormental Science 


(1) 


Spanish 4 


(1) 


Functions 


(1,2) 


Ecology 


(2) 


Spanish 


(AP) 


Pre-Calculus 


(1.2) 


Marine Science 


(2) 


Utinl 


(1) 


Calculus 


(AP) 


Health 


(2) 


Latin 2 


(1) 


Comp. Science 


(AP.l) 






Latin 3 


(1) 


Math SAT 


(2) 






Latin 4 


(1) 


Practical Math 


(2) 






Latin 


(AP) 



COURSE 


LEVEL 


Social Studies 




World History 9 


(1.2) 


World History 10 


(1.2) 


U.S. History 


(AP, 1, 


Street Law 


(2) 


Psychology 


(2) 


Economics 


(2) 


International Relations 


(2) 


Sociology 


(2) 


Current Domestic Issues (2) 


European History 


(AP) 


Cohasset Marine History (2) 


Fine Artg 




Art Major 


(1) 


Studio Art 


(1) 


Art 


(AP) 


Photography Major 


(1) 



220 



CLASS RANK AND GRADE POINT AVERAGE INFORMATION 

Class Rank and Grade Point Average are calculated by computer at the end of every year from Grade 9 through Grade 12. 
information is readily available and students are advised to check their rank in class periodically in order to improve upon 
performance and to assess their potential college admission. 

GjassJ^nk and Grade Point Average arc computed according to course and section difficulty. The three (3) levels of difBculty 

Advanced Placement courses 

Level one representing honors courses 

Level two representing a rigorous college preparatory program 

Non-academic electives have no weight and therefore have no bearing on Class Rank or Grade Point Average. 

WEIGHTING SCALE 



Curriculum 


Advanced 






Uvels 


Placement 


1 


2 


A 


5.00 


4.33 


4.00 


A- 


4.67 


4.00 


3.67 


B+ 


4.33 


3.67 


3.33 


B 


4.00 


3.33 


3.00 


B- 


3.67 


3.00 


2.67 


C+ 


3.33 , 


2.67 


2.33 


.C 


3.00 


2.33 


2.00 


C- 


2.67 


2.00 


L67 


D+ 


2.33 


L67 


L33 


D 


2.00 


■ 1.33 


LOO 


D- 


L67 


LOO 


.67 



Example: A grade of B in an Advanced Placement course would receive a weight of 4.00 while a grade 
of B in a Level 2 academic subject would receive a weight of 3.00. In other words, there is a 
difference of a full grade between an Advanced Placement grade and a grade in the Level 2 
Program. 



GRADING SYSTEM 



A = 94rl00 

A-= 90-93 

B+= 87-89 

B = 84-86 

B-= 80-83 

C+= 77-79 



C = 74-76 
C-= 70-73 
D+= 67-69 
D = 64-66 
D- = 60-63 
F = . Below 60 



221 



INDEX 

In Memoriam 3 

Elected Officials 4-5 

Appointed Officers 6-17 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Registrars, Board of 18 

Selectmen, Board of 19-20 

Town Clerk's Report 21 

Index, Annual Town Meeting, March 30, 2002 22 

Annual Town Meeting, March 30, 2002 23-72 

Annual Town Election, April 6, 2002 74-76 

State Primary, September 17, 2002 76-85 

State Primary, September 29, 2002 Recount 86 

State Election, November 5, 2002 87-92 

Index, Special Town Meeting, November 18, 2002 93 

Special Town Meeting, November 18, 2002 94-119 

Vital Statistics 120-125 

Election Officers, 2002 126 

Prospective Juror List 126 

Town Counsel 214-215 

FINANCIAL REPORTS 

Accountant 127-165 

Treasurer 166-168 

Collector 169-170 

Norfolk County Commissioner 171 

Assessors, Board of 172-173 

LAND USE CONTROL 

Building Department 174 

Health. Board of 175-176 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 177-179 

Planning Board 180 

Plymouth County Mosquito Control 181-182 

Government Island Committee 183 

Recycling Committee 184 

South Shore Co-operative 185-187 



222 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Department 188-1 

Police Department 189-1 

Public Safety Communication 1 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Public Works. Department of 192-1 

Water Commission 194- 

Sewer Commission 2 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Cohasset Housing Authority 202-2 

Council on Elder Affairs 204-2 

Historical Commission 206-2 

Paul Pratt Memorial Library 2 

Recreation Commission 211-2 

Youth Resources Committee 2 

EDUCATION 

South Shore Regional Vo-Tech High School 209-2 

School Committee and Superintendent of Schools 216-2 



223 



%